Standardized Testing

Frequently Asked Questions:
Standardized Testing

1. What standardized tests do I need to take to apply to Wellesley?

2. What are my "Score Choice" options?

3. Are standardized test scores an important factor in evaluating candidates?

4. Are there "cutoffs" in terms of what scores do or do not indicate an admissible candidate?

5. What are Wellesley's recommendations regarding the timing of taking the SATs or ACTs?

6. What were the ranges of test scores for the first-year class?

 

1. What standardized tests do I need to take to apply to Wellesley?

Current high school seniors who are planning to apply to Wellesley must take the College Board Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT Reasoning and SAT Subject Tests) or the test of the American College Program (ACT with Writing Test).

If you take the SAT: Two SAT Subject Tests of choice are also required. For students who are pursuing quantitative subjects such as mathematics, biology, neuroscience, etc., we strongly encourage you to take at least one quantitative SAT Subject test.

If you take the ACT: Wellesley requires the ACT with Writing Test.

If you plan to apply as an Early Decision applicant, we strongly recommend that you complete the tests before the end of your junior year or no later than October of your senior year.

2. What are my "Score Choice" options?

The College Board recently instituted Score Choice, a new score reporting policy, whereby students can choose which scores to send, either by test date for the SAT Reasoning Test or by individual test for the SAT Subject Tests.

When you sign up for a standardized test, you have the option of releasing the scores to Wellesley College. Wellesley records and reviews only your top scores from each SAT Reasoning section (Critical Reading, Math, or Writing) and SAT Subject or ACT sitting. Wellesley uses only your highest individual test scores to make our final admission decision. Therefore, sending all your scores will not have a negative impact on your application for admission. You may, however, choose to send only the scores from your highest test sittings.

The code required to submit scores to Wellesley College is 3957.

3. Are standardized test scores an important factor in evaluating candidates?

When you apply to Wellesley College, the Board of Admission – admission professionals, current Wellesley students, and professors – will review your application in its entirety. You will be evaluated on the strength of your high school courses, grades, teacher recommendations, test scores, extracurricular activities, and other information you choose to submit.

Readers on the Board of Admission use judgment and sensitivity in evaluating standardized testing.

Standardized testing alone is not a good indicator of a student's ability to succeed at Wellesley. However, when used in conjunction with the high school transcript, these test scores are helpful in providing additional insight into a student's academic readiness for Wellesley.

4. Are there "cutoffs" in terms of what scores do or do not indicate an admissible candidate?

No, Wellesley does not employ any "cutoff" scores.

Each summer, we compute the mean test scores of our entering class, as illustrated in the first chart below. We also compile additional applicant test score information. You can see in the second chart that the mean test score for SAT Reading was 689. However, there was also a significant range of scores both above and below 689. For example, 31% of accepted applicants scored between 650 and 690.

5. What are Wellesley's recommendations regarding the timing of taking the SATs or ACTs?

Wellesley recommends that you complete your SAT and/or ACT testing at least one month prior to the application deadline of the college(s) to which you plan to apply. You will feel less rushed – and perhaps more confident – in sitting for these exams if you know you have allowed ample time for your official scores to reach admission offices. Admission offices that require standardized testing typically will not begin to read a student's application until her testing profile is complete. When should I rush test scores?

Scores should be rushed only if they are released by you to admission offices at the last possible moment. Rushing is a costly option that does not often guarantee a quicker turnaround, and we encourage students to utilize the rush service only in last-minute circumstances.

6. Test Scores

The following tables show applicant test scores for Wellesley's Class of 2015.


Applicant Test Score Information

Writing Applied Admitted Percent Accepted Enrolled
750-800 872 434 50% 127
700-740 861 316 37% 130
650-690 818 215 26% 110
600-640 536 102 19% 53
550-590 314 43 14% 23
500-540 188 8 4% 5
Under 500 160 0 0% 9
ACT only 603 243 40% 126
TOEFL only 10 0 0% 0
         

 

Critical
Reading
Applied Admitted Percent Accepted Enrolled
750-800 611 337 55% 103
700-740 779 326 42% 123
650-690 806 238 30% 112
600-740 641 146 23% 72
550-590 425 47 11% 26
500-540 251 22 9% 10
Under 500 237 2 1% 2
ACT only 603 243 40% 126
TOEFL only 10 0 0% 0

 

Math Applied Admitted Percent Accepted Enrolled
750-800 1110 344 31% 118
700-740 692 278 40% 103
650-690 728 269 37% 113
600-740 551 151 27% 70
550-590 298 56 19% 33
500-540 211 19 9% 10
Under 500 160 1 1% 1
ACT only 603 243 40% 126
TOEFL only 10 0 0% 0

 

Related

Tip #1

Get organized. Chart admission and financial aid deadlines; leave space for your deadline date and completion date, based on your decision plan.


Tip #2

Read the instructions for Wellesley's requirements and the Common Application thoroughly before completing your application. Relax and don't worry; be yourself in your application.


Tip #3

Apply for financial aid at the same time you are applying for admission; submit the financial aid application by the stated deadline for your chosen decision plan.


Tip #4

If you plan to submit an art or music supplement, check these deadlines too, as they tend to be earlier than application deadlines. Please include an art or music resume with your supplement.