Contact

Davis Museum

Wellesley College

106 Central Street

Wellesley, MA  02481-8203

Tel: 781.283.2051

Fax: 781.283.2064

Visitors with Disabilites

The Davis, Collins Café, and Collins Cinema are wheelchair accessible. Two manual wheelchairs are available for free, without reservations; please inquire at the Information Desk. Public restrooms in the Museum and Café are accessible.

Other accommodations may be available if requested in advance. Please contact Jim Wice, Director of Disability Services for Wellesley College, at 781.283.2434 (voice/TTY) or jwice@wellesley.edu for more information.

Hours

General:
Tuesday - Sunday
11 am – 5 pm

 

Museum hours change with the school year, please contact the museum to confirm.

Tel. 781.283.2051

The Davis Museum and its programs are open to the public free of charge.

Mass Cultural Council

Collins Cafe

Hours of Operation (when school is in session):

Mon-Fri 8 am – 2 pm

For more information, please contact Tom Markham at tmarkham@wellesley.edu or 781.283.2897.

In addition to the Collins Café, there are a number of dining options open to the public across campus.

Special Events

Saturday, April 25, 2015
11:00 am - 3:00 pm


Family Day at the Davis: Words + Pictures

Davis Galleries, Lobby, and Collins Cafe

Learn all about the different ways that text and image interact in this edition of Family Day at the Davis!  Ask a graphic designer about his work, watch a calligrapher in action, enjoy story time with librarians from the Wellesley Free Library, make your own word art, and explore our special exhibitions with a scavenger hunt and family tours.  Light refreshments provided.  Free and open to the public.

Family Day is generously supported by The Palley Endowment Fund for Davis Museum Outreach Programs.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015
3:00 pm


Gallery Talk: Rembrandt and the Landscape Tradition

Margaret Carroll, Professor of Art History at Wellesley College and specialist in Dutch and Flemish Art, will discuss the work of Rembrandt and his contemporaries, the growth of the landscape genre in the seventeenth century, and how this growth reflects greater historical, social, and cultural trends of the time.

For more information, visit our Programs & Events page.

 

 

 

Give Search The Collection For Students
 
 
 
 

Free and Open to the Public