Louise Nevelson: Black

Louise Nevelson: Black
Mar 6 - Jun 9, 2013
Louise Nevelson, Luminous Zag, 1971 Painted wood overall: 96 in. x 76 in. x 10 in. (243.8 cm x 193 cm x 25.4 cm); base: 18 in. (45.7 cm) Gift of Milly and Arne Glimcher (Mildred L. Cooper, Class of 1961) in honor of Louise Nevelson 1986.2
Joan Levine Freedman ’57 and Richard I. Freedman Gallery

Installed in the Davis Museum’s “black-box” gallery, this exhibition offers a rare opportunity to consider the work of Louise Nevelson (1900 – 1988) in the lighting she preferred. For Nevelson, whose monochrome strategies in assemblage became legendary, black was particularly significant: it “symbolized harmony and continuity.” Moreover, as her long-time gallerist, Arne Glimcher, notes, the artist “used to install all of her works in very dark spaces. For her first shows of environments in the fifties…she painted the entire place black and she had almost no light in there. So your perception had to become hyper-active because of the light-deprivation.”

Curated by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director of the Davis, Louise Nevelson: Black is generously supported by the Davis Museum Program Endowed Fund.

Give Search The Collection For Students
 
 
 
 

Free and Open to the Public