Martin Luther: Protest in Print
Sep 19, 2017 - Dec 17, 2017
Albrecht Dürer, The Apocalyptic Woman and the Seven-Headed Dragon, ca. 1497. Bequest of Ann Kirk Warren (Ann Haggerty, Class of 1950) 2016.558.

This selection of sixteenth-century prints and books commemorates the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther's Disputation on the Power of Indulgences, also known as the 95 Theses. In voicing increasing complaint against the corruption of the Church, Martin Luther (1483-1546) became a leading provocateur of its reform. Protest in Print explores the history and popular thought that supported these grievances, the impact of the print medium on the circulation of protest and reform materials, and the artistic response to reform ideologies. Early printed books, borrowed from the Special Collections of Wellesley College, and artworks from the Davis Museum and the Yale University Art Gallery, demonstrate the role of print in disseminating reform thought and visually reiterating the themes of the Reformation. Curated by Meredith Fluke, Kemper Curator of Academic Programs, in collaboration with Professor Simon Grote, Assistant Professor of History at Wellesley College  and presented with the generous support from The Mary Tebbetts Wolfe ‘54 Davis Museum Program Fund.