event

Events


New InterViews

Gallery Talks with Davis Curators and Wellesley College Art Faculty


Wednesday, October 22, 2014 - 6:00pm
Location: Davis Museum Lobby

Delve deeper into the practices of the artists featured in the New View exhibition with this series of three gallery talks. Each session will feature interviews with faculty artists led by a Davis Museum curator and includes a reception in the lobby.

September 24: Eve Straussman-Pflanzer with Carlos Dorrien, Salem Mekuria, Qing-Ming Meng, and Daniela Rivera

October 22: Mike Maizels with David Kelley, Nicholas Knouf and David Olsen

November 12: Claire Whitner with Bunny Harvey, Candice Ivy, Phyllis McGibbon and Andrew Mowbray


Events


New InterViews

Gallery Talks with Davis Curators and Wellesley College Art Faculty


Wednesday, September 24, 2014 - 6:00pm
Location: Davis Museum Lobby

Delve deeper into the practices of the artists featured in the New View exhibition with this series of three gallery talks. Each session will feature interviews with faculty artists led by a Davis Museum curator and includes a reception in the lobby.

September 24: Eve Straussman-Pflanzer with Carlos Dorrien, Salem Mekuria, Qing-Ming Meng, and Daniela Rivera

October 22: Mike Maizels with David Kelley, Nicholas Knouf and David Olsen

November 12: Claire Whitner with Bunny Harvey, Candice Ivy, Phyllis McGibbon and Andrew Mowbray


Events

Poster for "New View" 2014 Faculty Exhibition

Drop-In Public Tour

Faculty Exhibition


Saturday, October 4, 2014 - 2:00pm
Location: Davis Museum Lobby

Special exhibition tours are led by a Student Guide and are free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. All tours start at 2:00pm and meet in the Davis lobby.


Events

Poster for "New View" 2014 Faculty Exhibition

Exhibition: New View

2014 Faculty Show


Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 11:00am
Location: Gerald and Marjorie Schechter Bronfman Gallery, Chandler Gallery

This fall, the Davis is proud to present New View, a survey of recent work by eleven faculty artists. Known to students in their classrooms and studios, the members of the faculty featured in this exhibition are at once educators, mentors, and active, professional artists. Their work is regularly shown in galleries and museums across New England, throughout the country, and in many cases internationally. This exhibition offers visitors the unique opportunity to explore the extraordinary talent and broad scope of art production within the faculty of Wellesley College.

Participating artists include Carlos Dorrien, Bunny Harvey, Candice Ivy, David Kelley, Phyllis McGibbon, Salem Mekuria, Qing-Min Meng, Andrew Mowbray, David Olsen, and Daniela Rivera from the studio art faculty and Nicholas Knouf from Cinema and Media Studies. Capturing their extensive range, the exhibition includes paintings, prints, and sculpture, as well as video and mixed media installations.

Curated by Claire Whitner, associate curator. Generously supported by Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.

Hours: Tuesday - Sunday, 11:00am - 5:00pm


Events


Midday Muse: Paul Dresher Double Duo

Artists in Residence 11/4-11/8


Wednesday, November 5, 2014 - 12:30pm
Location: Jewett Art Center Auditorium

Paul Dresher's Double Duo combines a duo of traditional chamber music instrumentation—Bang on a Can All Stars founding member Lisa Moore on piano and long-time Dresher collaborator Karen Bentley on violin—with a duo of recently invented instruments. Percussionist Joel Davel plays the Marimba Lumina, a specialized MIDI control surface capable of triggering myriad sounds, while he and Dresher split time playing the Quadrachord, a 14-foot long guitar-like stringed instrument invented by Dresher himself that is plucked, bowed, hammered, and strummed. Their residency at Wellesley will include a Midday Muse lecture/demo/Q&A, a Friday evening full concert, and a special family friendly event on Saturday afternoon. The audience will be invited on stage to see and play the invented instruments after each event!


Events

sculpture by Sam Ekwurtzel

Cole Fellow Solo Exhibition

New Sculptural Works by Sam Ekwurtzel


Monday, November 3, 2014 - 9:00am
Location: Jewett Art Center Art Gallery

The Alice C. Cole '42 Fellowship is awarded to an outstanding early-career painter or sculptor, providing a livable sum so as to support one year of unimpeded time and space to experiment, develop a body of work, and focus on future artistic goals.

2014 Cole Fellow Recipent: Samuel Ekwurtzel

Sam Ekwurtzel lives and works in New London, CT. His solo exhibition On the beach was presented by Real Art Ways in Hartford, CT. Other recent exhibitions include It's when its gone that you really notice it, Simone Subal Gallery, New York, NY; Kinds of light, Second Guest Projects, New York, NY; The Passenger Position, Reference Gallery, Richmond, VA; Homo Duplex, Reynolds Gallery, Richmond, VA; and A failed entertainment, Neiman Gallery, New York, NY.  Ekwurtzel was the 2011 Fountainhead Fellow in the department of sculpture at Virginia Commonwealth University. He has studied at the Hartford Art School, Columbia University, and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and was recently awarded a grant from the New York Community Trust.

For Ekwurtzel’s latest solo exhibition, On the Beach, he transformed tetrapods, mammoth concrete jacks strewn on Japanese beaches, into art for U.S. audiences who are not accustomed to the wave breaking forms. Interest in the practical sculptures strength is due in part to a lifelong fascination with the ocean. Having supported himself by working on various Alaskan commercial fishing vessels he is familiar with meditation on ocean and sky. He has also worked teaching sculpture at colleges and universities throughout New England.

He describes his sculptures and installations as “result[ing] from a preoccupation with representing and communicating spatial orientation. Working in cast iron, timber framing, underwater sound installation, or boat construction, I expose the space between a particular moment of inscription and the moment of exhibition.”

Installation Hours:

Mon-Fri: 9:00am - 5:00 pm

Sat - Sun:12:00 pm - 5:00 pm

 

 


Events

Nathalie Handal

DWS: Nathalie Handal and Robin Robertson

Distinguished Writers Series: Nathalie Handal and Robin Robertson


Monday, October 27, 2014 - 4:30pm
Location: GRH-237 Newhouse Lounge, GRH-235 Newhouse Conference Rm, GRH-240 Newhouse Conference Rm

About the Distinguished Writers Series

The Distinguished Writers Series reminds us that reading, writing, conversation, and laughter are related arts. The Newhouse Center venue is intimate and the format is simple: The writers read, have a conversation with a faculty member, and then engage in an open dialogue with the audience.

About Nathalie Handal

Nathalie Handal was raised in Latin America, France and the Arab world. Her most recent books include the critically acclaimed Poet in Andalucia, which Alice Walker lauds as "poems of depth and weight and the sorrowing song of longing and resolve," and Love and Strange Horses, winner of the 2011 Gold Medal Independent Publisher Book Award, which The New York Times says is "a book that trembles with belonging (and longing)." Handal is the editor of the groundbreaking classic The Poetry of Arab Women: A Contemporary Anthology, winner of the PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Book Award, and co-editor of the W.W. Norton landmark anthology Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia & Beyond, both Academy of American Poets bestsellers. Her most recent plays have been produced at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Bush Theatre and Westminster Abbey, London. Her work has appeared in numerous publications including Vanity Fair, Guernica Magazine, The Guardian, The Nation, Virginia Quarterly Review, and Ploughshares. Handal is a Lannan Foundation Fellow, winner of the 2011 Alejo Zuloaga Order in Literature, and Honored Finalist for the Gift of Freedom Award, among other honors. She is a professor at Columbia University and part of the Low-Residency MFA Faculty at Sierra Nevada College.

About Robin Robertson

Robin Robertson is from the Northeast coast of Scotland. He has published five collections of poetry—most recently Hill of Doorsand received a number of accolades, including the Petrarch Prize, the E.M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Cholmondeley Award, and all three Forward Prizes. He has also edited a collection of essays, Mortification: Writers' Stories of Their Public Shame; translated two plays of Euripides, Medea and the Bacchae; and, in 2006, published The Deleted World, a selection of free English versions of poems by the Nobel laureate Tomas Transtromer. His selected poems, Sailing the Forest, will be out from FGS in Fall 2014.


Events


Exhibition: Michael Craig-Martin

Art & Design


Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 11:00am
Location: Dorothy Johnston Towne Gallery

This recent print series from conceptual artist Michael Craig-Martin treats icons of contemporary art and design in the artist's signature style—rendered as spare, sharply graphic line drawings, with a flashy pop palette of colors in unexpected combinations. Craig-Martin was a star of the spectacular 2014 Friends of Art Patrons Trip to London and personally guided our lucky group through his unforgettable intervention at Chatsworth, home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. The purchase of this portfolio, made possible through the generosity of Friends of Art "London Trippers," brings the enthusiasm and energy of our experience home to campus. On view this fall, the presentation kicks-off the 50th Anniversary celebration of Friends of Art—who raise friends and funds in support of everything we do at the Davis!

 
Hours: Tuesday - Sunday, 11:00am - 5:00pm

Events

scene from "The Immigrant"

The Immigrant and the Gold Rush

Cinephile Sunday


Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 5:00pm
Location: Collins Cinema

CINÉPHILE SUNDAYS: 100 Years of Tramps

The Cinéphile Sundays series offers exemplary films—five each semester—from all parts of the globe and all periods of cinematic history. This fall, we celebrate the 100th anniversary of Charlie Chaplin’s creation of the character of the Tramp, by showing three of his films (one short and two features), plus three other films made in the spirit of the Tramp’s subversive laughter.

About Charlie Chaplin

Charlie Chaplin was born Charles Spencer Chaplin in London, England, in 1889. His big break came when he was spotted by an American producer and shortly thereafter took on 35 small roles in a single year. To distinguish himself, he decided to play a single identifiable character. The tramp was born. His career spanned over 75 years with 11 directorial credits, 4 wives, 6 sons, and 5 daughters.   

The Immigrant (1917)

The Immigrant is a silent comedy that follows the Tramp as an immigrant coming to the United States who is accused of theft on the voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. The short film includes the famous scene where Chaplin’s character kicks an immigration officer that was cited later as evidence of his anti-Americanism when he was forced to leave the United States in 1952.

The Gold Rush (1925)

The film is the quintessential Chaplin/Little Tramp film, with a balance of slapstick comedy and pantomime, social satire, and dramatic moments of tenderness. It was Chaplin's own personal favorite film, showcasing the Tramp as a romantic idealist and lone gold prospector at the turn of the century, with his cane, derby, distinctive walk, tight shabby suit, and mustache.

 

Events

spiral of watermelons and woman floating in the sea

Exhibition: Sigalit Landau: DeadSee


Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 11:00am
Location: Freedman Gallery

Known for a performative art practice that explores the landscapes of Israel, Sigalit Landau works in video, installation, sculpture, and drawing. Her elegant video, DeadSee, embeds the artist's nude body within a spiral of 500 floating watermelons, gradually unfurling in the buoyant waters of the Dead Sea. The piece reinscribes the representational tradition of "still life" with unexpected layers of reference and movement. Landau uses forms and sites that link the ancient and contemporary worlds; the spiral, the body, and the watermelon—with their allusions to antiquity—float in waters cited in the Bible and that today create common border among Israel, Jordan, and Palestine. With the green skins and hot red interiors of the melon, the pale figure curled in their midst, and the brilliant cyan surface, Landau composes a refined study in formal contrasts. Yet she also creates an image of interdependence: both fruit and flesh are largely comprised of water, dynamic and organic, yet vulnerable in the harsh salinity of the sea.

 
Curated by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro '37 Director, with generous support from Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.
 
Hours: Tuesday - Sunday, 11:00am - 5:00pm