event

Events


Golf @ Jack Leaman Invitational

Golf @ Jack Leaman Invitational


Saturday, April 19, 2014 - 9:00am
Location: Off-Campus Location


Events


Exhibition: "Like a Great Roman Ruin"

The College Hall Fire and Anne Whitney at 100


Sunday, April 20, 2014 - 11:00am
Location: Lawrence and Ina Lee Brown Ramer Gallery

This Exibition runs from March 17th - July 20th.

Co-curated by Jacqueline Marie Musacchio '89, Professor and Chair of the Art Department, and Andrew Shennan, Provost and Dean of the College, this exhibition includes objects and documents from the Davis, Archives, and Special Collections, as well as loans from the alumnae community. It examines art and life in College Hall from the founding of the College in 1870, to the great fire that decimated the building and its contents in 1914, to the fundraising and rebuilding efforts that followed.

The exhibition focuses particular attention on Anne Whitney's1883 statue of sociologist Harriet Martineau (Gift of Mrs. Wilson Payne (Elizabeth Rogers, Class of 1926)), a sculpture with a surprising role in the life of College Hall and a fascinating history. This exhibition is generously supported by Wellesley College Friends of Art, Wellesley College Archives, and the Office of the Provost and Dean of the College.


Events


Exhibition: Figment of the Past

Venetian Works on Paper from the Davis


Sunday, April 20, 2014 - 11:00am
Location: Levine Gallery

Figment of the Past: Venetian Works on Paper from the Davis

On View: February 5–May 4, 2013

Morelle Lasky Levine ’56 Works on Paper Gallery

 

“With its aqueous alleys and enchanted archways,

Venice has welcomed and hosted countless foreign travelers

as well as served as a hub of international commerce for centuries.

 In the eighteenth century, at the height of the Grand Tour,

 Italian artists found new ways to depict their city and appeal to an ever-burgeoning clientele of art collectors, connoisseurs, and tourists.”

 – Curator Eve Straussman-Pflanzer

 

Figment of the Past: Venetian Works on Paper from the Davis celebrates the Davis Museum’s rich holdings of early modern Venetian works on paper from the 16th century to the end of the Republic of Venice (1797).  Inspired by this extraordinary city during a period in which Venice ruled as an economic and artistic powerhouse, the exhibition displays twenty-five works by artists including Palma il Giovane, Canaletto and Tiepolo, among others.

Privileging water over land—Venice’s unusual topography and cultural riches have dazzled and overwhelmed centuries of residents and visitors. For some, like the writer Henry James, it was a portal to the past. For others, Venice represented an alternate way of living that ignited the artistic imagination. 

According to Eve Straussman-Pflanzer, senior curator of collections and curator of Figment of the Past, “The Davis Museum’s holdings of Venetian works on paper encompass a range of media from drawings (on vellum and paper) to prints (engravings, etchings, and woodcuts). These sheets illustrate many stages of the artistic process—from figure and compositional studies to investigations of light and perspective. The veduta, or viewing painting, drawing, or print, which figures prominently in this exhibition, was invented expressly to satisfy the visitor’s desire to take home a visual record of their sojourn. Also explored is the function that individual works on paper served both in the artistic process and daily life—a burgeoning area of academic inquiry. More than painting and sculpture, works on paper, due to their modest scale, provide an intimate view of the period in which they were made.”

Collected largely during the 20th century—particularly while John McAndrew was director of the Wellesley College art museum from 1947-1957—this exhibition is as much an exploration of La Serenissima, as the Venetian Republic was called, as a testament to Wellesley College’s vision as a collecting institution. McAndrew’s legacy extends beyond campus, as he was a founder and first chairman of Save Venice Inc., a foundation devoted to protecting and restoring the art and buildings of Venice.

Figment of the Past: Venetian Works on Paper is presented with generous support from the Marjorie Schechter Bronfman ’38 and Gerald Bronfman Endowment for Works on Paper.

Please also join us for these related events:

 

Reading — Landscapes of Italian Poetry: Views of Venice

Tuesday, Feb 18 | 2:30 p.m. | Morelle Lasky Levine ’56 Works on Paper Gallery | Free

Students from Associate Professor Sergio Parussa’s seminar ITAS 320: Landscapes of Italian Poetry will present a reading of Italian poetry inspired by works in the exhibition Figment of the Past: Venetian Works on Paper from the Davis. As part of their presentation, students will also discuss their interpretations of the texts and images. Poetry readings will be in Italian, with discussion in English.

 

Lecture — Paolo Veronese: Drawings, the Workshop, and the Perils of Connoisseurship with John Marciari

Thursday, February 27 | 6:00 p.m. | Collins Cinema | Free

Dr. Marciari’s lecture focuses on the work of leading Italian Renaissance painter and draftsman Paolo Veronese in relation to the works on view in the exhibition Figment of the Past. Dr. Marciari introduces Veronese’s work as a draftsman and explores the contentious formulation of the Veronese drawing canon, specifically to examine issues surrounding the use of Veronese’s drawings within his workshop and collaborative works by Veronese’s students.

Co-sponsored by the Davis and the Art Department, with support from The Edwards Fund.

 

Gallery Talk — Figment of the Past: Venetian Works on Paper from the Davis with Eve Straussman-Pflanzer and Barbara Lynn-Davis

Thursday, April 3 | 3:00 p.m. | Morelle Lasky Levine ’56 Works on Paper Gallery | Free

Senior Curator of Collections Eve Straussman-Pflanzer and Visiting Lecturer in Art Barbara Lynn-Davis explore representations of Venice in the exhibition, with particular focus on how Venetian artists experienced, represented, and imagined their city during the height of the Grand Tour.

Learn more about Palma Il Giovane from BBC’s “Your Painting”: http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/artists/jacopo-il-giovane-palma              

Join Sotheby’s Alexander Bell as he talks about Canaletto’s work: http://www.sothebys.com/en/news-video/videos/2013/10/canaletto-views-venice-rialto-stmarks-2013.html

Samples of Canaletto's work may be viewed at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston site: http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/bacino-di-san-marco-venice-32679

The Metropolitan Museum of Fine Art also offers more information on Giovanni Battista Tiepolo: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/tiep/hd_tiep.htm

 


Events


Exhibition: The Art of Science

Object Lessons at Wellesley College, 1870-1920


Sunday, April 20, 2014 - 11:00am
Location: Freedman Lober Viewing Alcove

Planned to accompany the Wellesley/Deerfield symposium, "The Art of Science in New England, 1700-1920", this small exhibition mines the recently rediscovered collection of objects and images used in science classrooms at Wellesley College from the time of the school's founding to the 1920s. Wellesley was at the forefront of science education for women and utilized a variety of drawings, models, and scientific instruments to provide the highest quality education possible. For example, Wellesley's founder, Henry Fowle Durant, purchased a set of papier-mache botanical models by the renowned French anatomist, Louis Thomas Jerome Auzoux, at the 1878 Exposition Universelle in Paris (currently housed in the Science Center).

Co-curated by Rebecca Bedell, Associate Professor of Art, Martha McNamara, Director of the New England Art and Architecture Program, and Jacqueline Marie Musacchio '89, Professor and Chair of the Art Department, with Eve Straussman-Pflanzer, Senior Curator of Collections, this exhibition is generously supported by Wellesley College Friends of Art, the Science Center Office, and the Office of the Provost and Dean of the College.

Please also join us for a related Gallery Talk on March 7 at 3:00 PM at the Davis.

- See more at: http://www.wellesley.edu/events/node/42157#sthash.4Ljl2w1j.dpuf

Planned to accompany the Wellesley/Deerfield symposium, "The Art of Science in New England, 1700-1920", this small exhibition mines the recently rediscovered collection of objects and images used in science classrooms at Wellesley College from the time of the school's founding to the 1920s. Wellesley was at the forefront of science education for women and utilized a variety of drawings, models, and scientific instruments to provide the highest quality education possible. For example, Wellesley's founder, Henry Fowle Durant, purchased a set of papier-mache botanical models by the renowned French anatomist, Louis Thomas Jerome Auzoux, at the 1878 Exposition Universelle in Paris (currently housed in the Science Center).

Co-curated by Rebecca Bedell, Associate Professor of Art, Martha McNamara, Director of the New England Art and Architecture Program, and Jacqueline Marie Musacchio '89, Professor and Chair of the Art Department, with Eve Straussman-Pflanzer, Senior Curator of Collections, this exhibition is generously supported by Wellesley College Friends of Art, the Science Center Office, and the Office of the Provost and Dean of the College.

Please also join us for a related Gallery Talk on March 7 at 3:00 PM at the Davis.

- See more at: http://www.wellesley.edu/events/node/42157#sthash.4Ljl2w1j.dpuf

Planned to accompany the Wellesley/Deerfield symposium, "The Art of Science in New England, 1700-1920", this small exhibition mines the recently rediscovered collection of objects and images used in science classrooms at Wellesley College from the time of the school's founding to the 1920s. Wellesley was at the forefront of science education for women and utilized a variety of drawings, models, and scientific instruments to provide the highest quality education possible. For example, Wellesley's founder, Henry Fowle Durant, purchased a set of papier-mache botanical models by the renowned French anatomist, Louis Thomas Jerome Auzoux, at the 1878 Exposition Universelle in Paris (currently housed in the Science Center).

Co-curated by Rebecca Bedell, Associate Professor of Art, Martha McNamara, Director of the New England Art and Architecture Program, and Jacqueline Marie Musacchio '89, Professor and Chair of the Art Department, with Eve Straussman-Pflanzer, Senior Curator of Collections, this exhibition is generously supported by Wellesley College Friends of Art, the Science Center Office, and the Office of the Provost and Dean of the College.

Please also join us for a related Gallery Talk on March 7 at 3:00 PM at the Davis.


Events


Exhibition: Tony Matelli: New Gravity

On View: February 6 - July 20, 2014


Saturday, April 19, 2014 - 12:00pm
Location: Gerald and Marjorie Schechter Bronfman Gallery, Chandler Gallery, Harold and Estelle Newman Tanner Gallery

Guido Van Der Werve's most recent single channel film, Nummer veertien, home, is on view at the Davis March 12–July 20, 2014.  It is the artist’s first solo exhibition at a U.S museum. Comprised of recent works from the past five years as well as new works created specifically for the Davis, the exhibition focuses on the artist’s discursive use of time, ambivalence, banality and wonder. In Matelli’s work the physical laws of objects are often reversed, upended or atomized, and with these deft manipulations of matter and gravity come profound reorientations in perspective and ways of seeing. Matelli creates a distortion field of sorts, a lens through which to question one reality and create another.

Installed in two parts at the Davis, the exhibition also sites two sculptures (Sleep Walker and Stray Dog) outdoors on campus. Tony Matelli: New Gravity will be on view February 5 - May 11, in the Bronfman & Chandler Galleries; and February 5 - July 20 in the Jobson & Tanner Galleries. The exhibition is free and open to the general public.

“Tony Matelli is a trader in combinatory illusions, a skilled manipulator of the restless mediation between metaphor, meaning and truth,“ said Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director of the Davis and curator of the exhibition. “His works are persistently surprising, inventive, powerful and playful – evoking complex sensations and inviting multiple viewings. We are delighted to present his first U.S. museum exhibition at the Davis and to introduce New England audiences to his work.”

Often employing a hyper-realistic idiom, Matelli’s work challenges our perceptions of reality. His sculptures create a disconcerting tension between uneasiness and humor, frequently suspending time and belief. Matelli imbues his art with layers of familiarity and discomfort, employing remarkable skill and technique to create works that ask us to take a critical look at ourselves and at the culture around us.

“There is a romantic impulse in my work, that strives to give form to my emotions and thoughts and the way I see the world,” commented Matelli. “I’m fascinated with that moment when you become aware of a perceptual shift in your environment, so what was a seemingly real-life experience becomes a complicated art experience. That approach to art is really powerful. It makes everything else seem like a prop that only pointed to an idea. The precision of praxis has a great impact on me, and my work operates in that spirit.”

Tony Matelli’s work is in numerous private and public collections including the Cranbrook Art Museum; FLAG Art Foundation; ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum; the National Centre of Contemporary Art, Moscow; Fundacion La Caixa, Madrid; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; and the Uppsala Konstmuseum, Sweden. Recent solo exhibitions have been presented at the Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin and the Palais de Tokyo, Paris. A mid-career survey, Tony Matelli: A Human Echo, premiered at the ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Denmark in 2012 and traveled to the Bergen Kunstmuseum, Norway in 2013. The artist lives and works in Brooklyn, and is represented by Marlborough Chelsea, New York and Andréhn-Schiptjenko, Stockholm.

Curated by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director of the Davis, Tony Matelli: New Gravity and the accompanying catalogue, designed by the artist with Conny Purtill, are generously supported by Wellesley College Friends of Art and the Anonymous ’70 Endowed Davis Museum Program Fund.

******

Please also join us for Tony Matelli: Artist’s Picks filming screenings, a series of four films selected by the artist to coincide with his exhibition. Following each, Cinema and Media Studies faculty will discuss the artist’s selections—and the intriguing notes he has provided on his choices (below)!

2001: A Space Odyssey

(1968, Dir. Stanley Kubrick) | February 12 | 6:00 p.m. | Collins Cinema

“The promise and potential of us evolving beyond our own biology gives me great pleasure. From the dawn of man, base and physical, toward the abstract and pure essence of ourselves. Terrifying. Inspiring.”

Matelli joins the post-film discussion for this event.

The Passenger

(1975, Dir. Michelangelo Antonioni) | March 12 | 6:00 p.m. | Collins Cinema

“The weight of my obligations is overwhelming. The inertia of my character has become unbearable. Everything feels like a dead end. I want out. New friends, new family, new morals. I want to become someone else.”

Inception

(2010, Dir. Christopher Nolan) | April 2 | 6:00 p.m. | Collins Cinema

“Ontological magical realism, I think about this a lot.”

Dillinger Is Dead

(1969, Dir. Marco Ferreri) | April 30 | 6:00 p.m. | Collins Cinema

“The girlfriend is a bore. Every day is like the last. My general privilege has me sleepwalking toward a shallower and shallower horizon. I could really use a clean break.”

Matelli joins the post-film discussion for this event.

Co-sponsored by the Davis and the Wellesley College Cinema and Media Studies Program, this series is generously supported by the Davis Museum Film Program Gift.


Events


Music Recital

Laurel Kroo, flute


Saturday, May 17, 2014 - 5:30pm
Location: Pendleton West 220 Music Recital Room

with Olga Talroze, piano


Events


Joan Almon - Alliance for Childhood

Encouraging Adventure: Redefining Success to include Risk


Thursday, May 8, 2014 - 7:00pm
Location: Alumnae Hall Auditorium (201)

"ENCOURAGING ADVENTURE: Redefining Success to include Risk"

Please join us in exploring why encouraging children to engage in risk-taking can help prepare our youth for life’s challenges.

Program includes a presentation followed by Q&A.

Free and open to the public

About the Child Study Center:

Founded a century ago, the Child Study Center is one of the country’s leading laboratory nursery schools. Affiliated with Wellesley College’s Department of Psychology, we offer a model preschool program, support innovative research, and train teachers, clinicians, and other professionals.

About the speaker:

Joan Almon is co-founder of the Alliance for Childhood (www.allianceforchildhood.org), a research and advocacy organization with a major focus on restoring play in children’s lives, in and out of school. She writes and lectures on children’s healthy development, creativity, and playful ways of learning. She also loves telling stories and doing puppetry with children. She began her career as a Waldorf preschool and kindergarten children in Maryland and became a travelling teacher, working with schools around the world.

ALLIANCE FOR CHILDHOOD

Mission Statement

The Alliance for Childhood promotes policies and practices that support children's healthy development, love of learning, and joy in living. Our public education campaigns bring to light both the promise and the vulnerability of childhood. We act for the sake of the children themselves and for a more just, democratic, and ecologically responsible future.

Critical Issues Affecting Childhood

While promoting a broad range of policies and practices essential to children's well-being, the Alliance for Childhood works intensively on a few critical issues. Among these are the loss of creative play and hands-on activities in children's lives, and the excessive amounts of time spent in front of screens instead of in face-to-face engagement with other children, caring adults, and the natural world. We also work against the commercialization of childhood, the misuse of high-stakes testing, and increasing levels of childhood obesity.

Restoring Play: Play initiated and directed by children should be a rich and vital part of every child's life. It enhances cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development and well-being. The Alliance works with other organizations and individuals in a multi-pronged campaign to restore play.

Mediaand Childhood: Today's children spend far less time than earlier generations in face-to-face engagement with other children, caring adults, and the natural world. The lure of electronic entertainment diminishes active play and work and the learning of hands-on skills, all of which support children's healthy development and prepare them for the workplace.When it comes to advanced technologies in childhood, the losses often outweigh the gains.

The Alliance's reports and position statements on technology and children have sparked a national debate. Parents, educators, and policymakers around the world have begun to ask searching questions about the potential dangers of a high-tech childhood. Our goal is more balanced and reasoned public discourse about the changes that technology has created in modern childhood.

High Stakes Testing Project: Public schools have seena dramatic increase in standardized testing as a result of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and, more generally, public acceptance of testing as an equitable way to make schools "accountable."The new tests invariably carry high stakes; that is, the results are linked to serious consequences for students, teachers, and schools. Most Americans believe that linking test results to rewards and punishments is an effective way to force schools to improve, even though research indicates that using tests in this way has the opposite effect, worsening academic performance and increasing dropout rates.

Commercialization of Childhood: Marketing to children has proliferated wildly since it was deregulated by Congress in the 1980s. Approximately $15 billion is spent each year marketing toys, food, and entertainment to children. Children under 19 themselves spend $200 billion per year; children under 12 influence another $500 billion per year in family spending. No longer limited to TV ads, marketers now continually bombard children with ploys in their homes, neighborhoods, and schools. The Alliance partners with 25 other organizations in the Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood.

Peace Education: In the months following September 11, 2001 the Alliance created several resources about educating children for peace, including a list of ten simple but effective actions that families and schools can take. Ten Steps for Peace Education has been reprinted in many publications.

Childhood Obesity: In May 2003 the Alliance hosted a briefing on childhood obesity for the U.S. Senate at the request of Senator Mary Landrieu. Presenters included Dr. David Ludwig of Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital in Boston, a school chef from Vermont, and representatives from the Urban Nutrition Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania, which teaches nutrition and gardening in inner-city schools in Philadelphia.

In its work on restoring childhood play, the Alliance notes evidence that children burn far more calories during active play, especially outdoors, than in sedentary activities. There is also evidence that strongly links time spent in front of TV and computer screens with increased risk of obesity.


 


Events


Cornille Lecture with Carla Kaplan

"Queen of the Muckrakers: The Life and Times of Jessica Mitford"


Thursday, April 17, 2014 - 4:30pm
Location: GRH-237 Newhouse Lounge, GRH-235 Newhouse Conference Rm, GRH-240 Newhouse Conference Rm

Mary L. Cornille Lecture

Thursday, April 17, 2014, 4:30PM

Newhouse Center for the Humanties, Green Hall/Free and Open to the Public

"Queen of the Muckrakers: The Life and Times of Jessica Mitford"

A talk by Carla Kaplan, Mary Cornille Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Humanities at Wellesley College and the Stanton W. and Elizabeth K. Davis Distinguished Professor of American Literature at Northeastern University

Since writing Zora Neale Hurston: A Life in Letters, Kaplan's work has gravitated to hybrid forms (biography and letters; group biography and cultural history; theory and narrative), using extensive primary archives to illuminate people who walk away from lives which others covet, envy, and idealize. Her recent book, Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance (Harper Collins, 2013), traces six unlikely lives as they cross rigid racial lines viewed as impermeable in the 1920's.

Described by reviewers as "remarkable," "clear-sighted," "compelling," "fascinating," and "amazing," it has been named one of the "Ten Best" books of the year (Publisher's Weekly) and is a New York Times "Notable" book. Kaplan will speak about her next project, Queen of the Muckrakers: The Life and Times of Jessica Mitford: a biography of a woman who walked away from British aristocracy to become an American activist and eventually revitalize one of the oldest and most venerable forms of American narrative nonfiction: muckraking. The daughter of a wealthy British peer, Decca, as she was known, was the second-youngest and in many ways the most intriguing of the famous "Mitford Girls," known also as the "Mad Mitfords." Decca both adored her family and was determined to escape it. Kaplan's biography follows Decca as she runs away from England with her second cousin, fights in the Spanish Civil War, makes her way to Miami and becomes a Communist, is trained as an activist by Virginia and Clifford, fights for racial and economic justice in Oakland, and becomes a celebrated writer.


Events


HCC Tumbler Sale


Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:00am
Location: Tower Court West Great Hall


Events


Hawai'i Club Lu'au - Rain Location


Sunday, May 4, 2014 - 4:00pm
Location: Wang Campus Center Tishman Commons (LWC-105)