Freedom Project

Charles Murray, Second Annual Thomas Jefferson Lecture on Freedom


Wednesday, April 13, 2016 - 7:00pm
Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room

Second Annual Thomas Jefferson Lecture on Freedom 

Charles Murray is a political scientist, author, and libertarian. He first came to national attention in 1984 with the publication of Losing Ground, which has been credited as the intellectual foundation for the Welfare Reform Act of 1996. His 1994 New York Times bestseller, The Bell  Curve  (Free Press, 1994), coauthored with the late Richard J. Herrnstein, sparked heated controversy for its analysis of the role of IQ in shaping America’s class structure. Murray’s other books include What It Means to Be a Libertarian (1997), Human Accomplishment (2003), In Our Hands (2006), and Real Education (2008), and Coming Apart (2012). His most recent book, “By the People: Rebuilding Liberty Without Permission”  (Crown Forum, 2015) urges Americans to stem governmental overreach and use America’s unique civil society to put government back in its place.

(Bio from the American Enterprise Institute) 
 


Curators' Choice: Gendered Value


February 10–June 5, 11:00 AM–5:00 PM Tuesday through Sunday
Freedman Gallery

Curators' Choice: Gendered Value places the permanent collections of the Davis Museum within the context of feminist art history. This exhibition seeks to illuminate the complex interplay between gender and value via artworks that have rarely been on view. Selected by eight members of the curatorial staff, the works highlight a unique cross-section of the collections, across periods, genres, and cultures. Drawing upon individual expertise, each curator examines works that encapsulate their personal conception of “Gendered Value."

Curated by Alicia LaTores, Curatorial Assistant, with generous support from the Wellesley College Friends of Art.

Museum hours: 11:00am - 5:00pm, Tuesday through Sunday

photo: Circle of Annibale Carracci, Christ and the Woman of Samaria, ca. 1620-30.  Oil on canvas, 13 1/4 in. x 20 in. (33.7 cm x 50.8 cm). Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Arthur K. Solomon. 1953.21.



Shakespeare Illustrated

"That Right Promethean Fire: Shakespeare Illustrated"


February 10–June 5
Levine Gallery

Celebrating the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, this exhibit will explore the legacy of artistic engagement with the Bard’s plays. From the monumental project of the Boydell Shakespeare Gallery to the Weimar Republic; from Victorian America to contemporary U.S. poetry, Shakespeare’s work has repeatedly inspired artists to respond in compelling and diverse ways. Here, a selection of paintings, prints, photographs, and books will illuminate how artists such as Angelika Kauffman, Eugène Delacroix, Max Beckmann, and Rockwell Kent have engaged with the rich corpus of Shakespeare’s work. Drawn from the collections of the Davis Museum, Special Collections of the Clapp Library, and the Wellesley College Archives, Shakespeare Illustrated will also highlight Wellesley’s profound interest in Shakespeare over more than a century of time.

Curated by Meredith Fluke, Kemper Curator of Academic Programs at the Davis, in collaboration with William Cain, Mary Jewett Gaiser Professor of English and Ruth Rogers, Curator of Special Collections at Wellesley College. The exhibition is generously supported by Wellesley College Friends of Art.

Museum hours: Tuesday - Sunday, 11:00am - 5:00pm

image: Eugène Delacroix, Mort d'Ophélie (Act IV. Sc. VII), from the series "Hamlet," 1843. Lithograph. The Dorothy Braude Edinburg (Class of 1942) Collection. 1972.56.54

 


Davis Discoveries Symposium

The Green Lady Mystery (Sir Joshua Reynolds)


Friday, February 19, 2016 - 3:00pm
Collins Cafe, Collins Cinema

Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723 – 1792) was the most prominent portrait artist in England in the 18th century. Having studied the Old Masters in Rome, Reynolds devised a “Grand Manner” that emphasized the dignity of his sitters and ushered in a Golden Age of British portraiture. The Davis Museum is fortunate to count among its collections a portrait of a young woman by Reynolds. Prior to her recent conservation treatment, she had the unfortunate nickname of the “Green Lady”—a reference to her once sallow appearance caused by decades of grime and yellowed varnish. Join us for an afternoon symposium to hear curators and conservators discuss who she is, where she came from, and how she has been restored to reveal a fresh face ready to hang in the reinstalled galleries.



Curatorial Gallery Talk: Gendered Value


February 16, April 26
Davis Museum Lobby

At each of two curatorial gallery talks for Gendered Value: Curator's Choice, four Davis curators will present their personal selections for the exhibition and discuss their process for interpreting the highly-contested phrase, “gendered value,” as well as its implications for our understanding of art history.

photo: Circle of Annibale Carracci, Christ and the Woman of Samaria, ca. 1620-30.  Oil on canvas, 13 1/4 in. x 20 in. (33.7 cm x 50.8 cm). Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Arthur K. Solomon. 1953.21.

 


A Discussion with Carey Perloff


Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 4:15pm
Alumnae Hall Ruth Nagel Jones Foyer (100D)

Carey Perloff, Artisitic Director of the American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco, speaks of her professional journey and the role of theatre in today's world.

Perloff is celebrating her 24th season as artistic director of A.C.T. Her tenure there has been marked by the rebuilding of the earthquake-damaged Geary Theater (now the American Conservatory Theater), the creation of a new core company of actors; revitalization of the acclaimed A.C.T. Master of Fine Arts Program; receipt of the 1996 Jujamcyn Theaters Award, honoring A.C.T.’s efforts to develop creative talent for the theater; a series of international collaborations and dozens of successful productions.

Perloff is also an award-winning playwright. Her play Kinship premiered at the Théâtre de Paris last October in a production starring Isabelle Adjani and Niels Schneider and was produced at the Williamstown Theater Festival last summer, starring Cynthia Nixon and directed by Jo Bonney. Waiting for the Flood has received workshops at A.C.T., New York Stage and Film, and Roundabout Theatre. Higher was developed at New York Stage and Film, won the 2011 Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation Theatre Visions Fund Award, and received its world premiere in February 2012 in San Francisco. Luminescence Dating premiered in New York at The Ensemble Studio Theatre, was coproduced by A.C.T. and Magic Theatre, and is published by Dramatists Play Service. The Colossus of Rhodes was workshopped at the O’Neill National Playwrights Conference, premiered at Lucille Lortel’s White Barn Theatre, and was produced at A.C.T. in 2003.

Before joining A.C.T., Perloff was artistic director of Classic Stage Company in New York, where she directed the world premiere of Ezra Pound’s Elektra, the American premiere of Pinter’s Mountain Language, and many classic works. Under Perloff’s leadership, CSC won numerous OBIE Awards, including the 1988 OBIE for artistic excellence. In 1993, she directed the world premiere of Steve Reich and Beryl Korot’s opera The Cave at the Vienna Festival and Brooklyn Academy of Music.

A recipient of France’s Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and the National Corporate Theatre Fund’s 2007 Artistic Achievement Award, Perloff received a B.A. Phi Beta Kappa in classics and comparative literature from Stanford University and was a Fulbright Fellow at Oxford. She was on the faculty of the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University for seven years, and teaches and directs in the A.C.T. Master of Fine Arts Program. Perloff is on the board of the Hermitage Artist Retreat in Sarasota, Florida, and is the proud mother of Lexie and Nicholas. Perloff is the author of Beautiful Chaos: A Life in the Theater (City Lights, March 2015).



Davis Spring Opening Celebration


Wednesday, February 10, 2016 - 5:00pm
Collins Cafe, Collins Cinema

The Davis Museum kicks off its spring exhibition season with a lecture by videogame artist Jason Rohrer in Collins Cinema, followed by a lively reception in the Davis lobby and galleries to celebrate the openings of The Game Worlds of Jason Rohrer, That Right Promethan Fire: Shakespeare Illustrated, and Gendered Value: Curator's Choice. All are welcome; this event is free and open to the public.

Image above: Jason Rohrer, Transcend (2005)



Queer As Opera

Kirsten Scott, voice with Jenny Tang, piano


Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 8:00pm
Jewett Art Center Auditorium

This provocative program gives voice to the transcendence of opera and art song across the constantly shifting tides of generational change. Although gender issues many seem quite contemporary, opera’s treatment of fluidity traces back for centuries and can provide a lens through which to view modern society. More currently, contemporary composers are exploring the transgendered operatic voice. Ultimately, though, what truly runs through this program is the representation of love. Queer as Opera pays homage to the queer, controversial, and revolutionary visions of historic composers, and purports a forward-looking vision that challenges social convention and embraces evolving representations of love.

Alumna Kirsten Scott ’11, has already begun to forge a reputation as a superb operatic mezzo-soprano. Kirsten Scott is a “creamy toned” mezzo with “charm to burn.” Parterre Box praised her recent performance in New York City as Pepa in the rarely-performed opera Goyescas by Enrique Granados, noting she “had every requirement for this show-off role and a large, meaty, exciting mezzo that has obviously trained with Carmen in her headlights.” Opera News applauded her “vibrant” and “vivacious” Rosina in The Barber of Seville and her “superb” performance as Nicklausse in The Tales of Hoffmann was hailed by both The New York Times and Opera News

In the United States she has performed at Jordan Hall (Boston), The Kennedy Library (Boston), Merkin Hall (NYC), The National Opera Center (New York City), the Adrienne Arsht Center (Miami, FL) the Metropolitan Opera Guild (NYC), Harris Hall (Aspen) and Wheeler Opera House (Aspen). In 2011 she performed as lead soloist in the world premiere of the oratorio Illuminessence: Prayers for Peace, a piece commissioned by the Vatican for the decennial commemoration of 9/11. Held in Boston’s iconic Jordan Hall, the performance was broadcast live by WGBH Public Radio. Ms. Scott was named a district winner of the Eastern Region Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions in November 2014 and a 2015 Portland Opera Lieber Award recipient. This October, she was selected by Martina Arroyo to perform for Ruth Bader Ginsberg and other prominent New York court officials in “The Trial of Don Giovanni” to celebrate of the 225th Anniversary of the New York Supreme Court.

In addition to this concert, Kirsten will give a Master Class and will meet with students to discuss her experiences as a professional singer.



Davis Discoveries Symposium Reception

The Green Lady Mystery (Sir Joshua Reynolds)


Friday, February 19, 2016 - 5:00pm
Davis Museum Lobby

Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723 – 1792) was the most prominent portrait artist in England in the 18th century. Having studied the Old Masters in Rome, Reynolds devised a “Grand Manner” that emphasized the dignity of his sitters and ushered in a Golden Age of British portraiture. The Davis Museum is fortunate to count among its collections a portrait of a young woman by Reynolds. Prior to her recent conservation treatment, she had the unfortunate nickname of the “Green Lady”—a reference to her once sallow appearance caused by decades of grime and yellowed varnish. Join us for an afternoon symposium to hear curators and conservators discuss who she is, where she came from, and how she has been restored to reveal a fresh face ready to hang in the reinstalled galleries.



Retrofit Painting Presents...

Art installation by Thomas Willis


Monday, February 8, 2016 - 6:00am
Jewett Art Center Art Sculpture Court

Examining the relationships and disparities between the history of painting, trademark, and entertainment, Thomas Willis’ installation, Retrofit Painting Presents… , brings a representation of the hedonic Las Vegas Strip to the academic Jewett Art Center with his conceptual art brand, Retrofit Painting. Willis’ Retrofit Painting, part parody, part praise, is a designer label and online store created to market and sell paintings crafted as objects for everyday use. The label’s “luxury products” range from ready-to-wear painting shoes, bags, sunglasses, hats and other custom accessories. During the summer of 2015 The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas invited Willis as their summer artist-in-residence. He transformed the appearance of their art studio (positioned among shops and restaurants) into a “high-end retail boutique.” In this installation Willis displayed the brand's paintings-as-objects to the casino visitors as a retail outlet, while alluding to the problems and perceptions of flatness on the Las Vegas Strip. For the Jewett Sculpture Court Gallery Willis will surround the “products” and “promotional materials” of Retrofit Painting with the cultural elements of a Las Vegas nightclub to create a theatrical setting for viewing the art.

Within the context of Las Vegas and beyond, Retrofit Painting appropriates high production media, commercial advertising, minimal design, and capitalist business practices to expound on and bring into question the potency and consumption of surface in the marketplace. Visit the piece’s website www.retrofitpainting.com, or www.thomaswillis.net for more information on the project.

Thomas Willis (1985) is the Technology Support Specialist for the Department of Art at Wellesley College, managing the photo, video, and new media labs and equipment for the Jewett Art Center. Willis is a Boston-based artist originally from Las Vegas, NV. He received his BFA in painting and drawing from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 2009. His art has shown in numerous exhibitions across the United States, with works in institutions such as the Luo Ruvo Center for Brain Health, Bentley University, and the deCordova Museum. Willis currently has a studio at the Dorchester Art Project in the neighborhood of Field’s Corner, Boston.