Selected Projects

Project Director(s) Project Title Project Description
Linda Charmaraman, Ph.D.
Promoting public awareness of the road to educational equity for girls of color: A multilevel media strategy
A multifaceted effort with Teen Voices to promote educational equity for girls of color, the project will summarize up-to-date research on the strengths and challenges for girls of color in achieving educational equity in the Boston area, capture on short video clips the points of view of adolescent girls of color and their advocates responding to the research findings, widely disseminate the video clips on social network sites and with multiple educational stakeholders, and produce a report that incorporates diverse communities' responses to the video and the commentary and recommendations it generates.
Linda
Charmaraman,
Ph.D.
Online Social Science Research about Underrepresented Youth
This study will provide researchers with explicit procedures to design and implement accessible and culturally sensitive online surveys, with the main goal of targeting and recruiting diverse, hard-to reach populations of youth nationwide using novel
recruitment procedures.
Monica Driggers, J.D.
What Do Abused Women of Color and Immigrant Women Experience during Family Court Proceedings?
Battered women of color often report that they do not receive fair treatment in family courts and that the courts’ insufficiencies can lead to devastating consequences for them and for their children.
Sumru Erkut,
Ph.D.,
Laura Pappano, M.A.,
Allison Tracy,
Ph.D.
The Audit Study: Do Some College Activities Boost Chances of Entry to Corporate Careers?
This study explores factors corporate recruiters consider in screening resumes of potential candidates for entry level management training positions, an entrée to corporate leadership.
Sumru Erkut,
Ph.D.,
Jennifer Grossman, Ph.D.
Evaluation of the Impact of Get Real on Middle School Students' Sexual Health Outcomes
This project is an evaluation of the effectiveness of Get Real, Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts' (PPLM) Middle school comprehensive sex education curriculum. The evaluation is designed to assess the curriculum's effectiveness in achieving short-term objectives, such as positive attitudes toward delaying sexual activity and toward contraception and protection use, effective communicating about sex with parents and peers, greater understanding of the need to limit the number of sexual encounters and sexual partners, increased understanding of the risks involve in frequent sex, sex with an older partner, and having many sex partners, increased intention to practice correct and consistent use of protection and not to combine sexual activity and substance use. The long-term objective is promoting sexual health through limiting unintended pregnancies and increasing the correct and consistent use of contraceptives and other protection.
Ellen Gannett,
Ed.M.,
Georgia Hall, Ph.D.
National Institute on Out-of-School Time
Formerly named the School-Age Child Care Project, the National Institute on Out of School Time (NIOST) engages in research, education, training, and community development projects to increase awareness about the importance of children’s out-ofschool time and to improve the quality and quantity of options.
Ellen Gannett,
Ed.M.,
Georgia Hall, Ph.D.
Afterschool Matters
Initiative: National
Expansion
As the Afterschool Matters Initiative moves into its sixth year, NIOST is leading a national expansion of this project. NIOST will incorporate the Afterschool Matters Initiative into its national agenda for building the out-of-school time field and bridging research and practice.
Ellen Gannett,
Ed.M.
Career Pathways II:
Expanding T.E.A.C.H.
Early Childhood® to
Support Youth Workers
In phase two of the Career Pathways Project, the National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST), in partnership with Child Care Services Association and Next Generation Youth Work Coalition, is supporting a subset of the original Career Pathways states to expand upon work begun during phase one. Phase two focuses on piloting a strategy that has emerged as particularly promising-- expanding the success of T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood ® to reach staff who work with school-age or older youth in self-regulated programs.
Ellen Gannett,
M.Ed.,
Georgia Hall, Ph.D.
Building an Outcomes
Evaluation System Phase III: Developing Youth and Family Surveys
NIOST has designed and developed two measurement tools—a youth survey (SAYO-Y) and a family survey (SAYO-F). These two tools will be used by Massachusetts Department of Education grantees to better understand youth needs and their program experiences, and help pinpoint areas where youth may benefit from additional support. The SAYO-Y, in particular, will provide programs with data on important youth outcomes that are associated with later academic and life success but which have not been possible to measure through teacher and staff responses to the SAYO-T and SAYO-S.
Tracy Gladstone, Ph.D.
Primary Care Internet- Based Depression Prevention for Adolescents
This multi-site study was designed to evaluate a primary care/Internet-based depression prevention program for at-risk adolescents and their families. The project, Promoting Adolescent Health, is based on face-to-face interventions of demonstrated efficacy. It combines a sustained motivational program delivered to adolescents by their pediatricians with an Internet-based intervention that aims to help teens understand the connection between their thoughts and moods, the importance of scheduling activities, and the relation between depression and interpersonal functioning.
Tracy Gladstone,
Ph.D.
Prevention of Depression: Impact on the Transition to Early Adulthood
This project is a four-site effectiveness study that will examine the long-term effects of the CBP intervention on preventing depression during the critical developmental transition to young adulthood, and will assess potential biological and psychosocial moderators of intervention response. The project also will examine the longer term cost-effectiveness of the CBP.
Jennifer
Grossman, Ph.D.
Family Communication, Culture, and Gender in a Middle-School Sex Education Program
This investigation examines how parents and teens communicate about sex and relationships and their reactions to family activity assignments in a sex education curriculum. Diverse cultural, class, and gender influences will be explored while addressing issues critical to the success and development of adolescent girls.
Georgia Hall,
Ph.D.
Physical Activity over
Time: The Health
Outcomes of Elementary
School Children
This project is analyzing existing data sets from NICHD’s Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development to examine the physical activity of youth. This secondary analysis examines physical activity and health in third grade as a predictor of physical activity and health and establishment of physical activity habits in later elementary and middle school grades. This study will increase understanding of factors and mechanisms that influence changes in the physical well-being of contemporary youth that are associated with forming a habit of physical activity participation. The results of this study will inform the development of practices within school and out-of-school-time settings that support children and adolescents to develop sustained habits of physical activity.
Georgia Hall,
Ph.D.
Program Practices: An
Investigation of Physical
Activity and Healthy
Eating Standards and
Practices
This research study uses quantitative and qualitative data collection methods and multiple regression modeling to examine healthy eating and physical activity opportunities in a national sample of out-of-school time programs.
Georgia Hall,
Ph.D.,
Michelle Porche, Ed.D.
Immigrant Youth and
Families and Out-of-School-Time Programs: Identifying effective practices
To lay the groundwork for examination at the national level, this project will identify program models, document effective practices, and develop training content and strategies. The findings from the project will help youth workers better understand the experiences of refugee and immigrant youth and families in out-of-school-time programs in the Massachusetts and New Hampshire region.
Amy Hoffman,
MFA
Women's Review of Books
Since 1983, the Women's Review of Books has provided a unique forum for serious, informed discussion of new writings by and about women.
Judith V. Jordan, Ph.D.
Jean Baker Miller Training Institute
The goal of this Institute is to provide a period of intense study of relational theory and its applications in mental health and other fields, as well as research and outreach projects grounded in relational cultural theory.
Erika Kates, Ph.D.
The Massachusetts
Women's Justice Network
The MWJN will continue and extend the work of two previous Shaw-funded initiatives: the Women in Prison Coalition (2009-2010), identifying promising gender-responsive, community-based programs for women offenders in Massachusetts, and the Reentry and Alternatives to Incarceration (ATI) project (2010-2011), exploring alternatives to incarceration for women in Massachusetts. The current project will create a Massachusetts Women’s Justice Network to implement the recommendations of the 2011 report, and develop a model program for women at risk of involvement in the criminal justice system.
Sari Pekkala Kerr, Ph.D.
The Importance of
Information in the Choice of Study Place and Field
This is a joint project with Helsinki Center for Economic Research (HECER), Aalto University, Government Institute for Economic Research, and the University of Helsinki. The project will evaluate how much high school seniors know about studying opportunities and the effects of educational choices on future labor market status and earnings. The second stage of the project analyzes how additional information affects the students’ application process and entry into higher education.
Sari Pekkala Kerr, Ph.D.
High-Skilled  Immigration and the Structure of High-Tech Firms
The research team is leading a project to examine the role of firms in shaping high-skilled immigration to the United States. The investigators seek to understand how high-tech firms utilize immigrant scientists and engineers relative to comparable native workers, and to determine what effects this has on careers of aging domestic workers.
Sari Pekkala Kerr, Ph.D.
Family Policies and
Women’s Labor Market
Careers
Despite the dramatic increase in women’s labor market participation and the growing proportion of women’s earnings in the family budget, women are more likely than men to interrupt their work careers for family reasons, a pattern that plays an important role in determining the gender wage gap and the ‘familybased’ wage gap between women with and without children. This project analyzes and compares the long-term effects of parental leave policies in Finland and the United States on women’s careers, including risk of unemployment, short- and long-term earnings growth, and incidence of hiring, firing, and promotions.
Nancy MacKay,
B.A.,
Nova Biro, MBA
Open Circle: Social Competency
The Open Circle Program has developed a curriculum that provides opportunities for elementary school students, their teachers, school administrators, and parents to learn and practice communication, self control and interpersonal problem solving skills.
Nancy Marshall,
Ed.D.,
Wendy Wagner
Robeson, Ed.D.
Men’s Changing Family Roles
With the increasing incidence of men involved in tasks reserved for women in earlier generations, such as stay-at-home dads and men who are solo caregivers for their children while mom is at work, this groundbreaking project will examine these changing roles with a view to understanding their impact on family relationships and interactions. Researchers will interview men 20 years after their children were born to explore short- and long-term experiences and implications.
Nancy Marshall,
Ed.D.,
Wendy Wagner
Robeson, Ed.D.,
Joanne Roberts,
Ph.D.
Massachusetts Early
Care and Education
Studies
Massachusetts Early Care and Education Studies is a group of inter-related research projects with a common interest in understanding the state of early care and education in Massachusetts today. Research projects include: The Massachusetts Cost and Quality Study; The Massachusetts Capacity Study; Family Income, Infant Child Care, and Child Development Study; Massachusetts Early Care and Education and School Readiness Study; Health and Safety in Massachusetts Early Care and Education Programs; Child Care Voucher Project; and Quality Inventory for a 21st Century Plan for Boston's Youngest Children.
Nancy Marshall,
Ed.D.,
Wendy Wagner
Robeson, Ed.D.,
Joanne Roberts,
Ph.D.
Work, Families and Children
For more than 20 years, researchers on the Work, Families and Children team have studied the lives of children and adults, and the workplaces, early care and education programs and families in which they live, work and grow. The Work, Families and Children team applies an ecological systems model to the study of the lives of children and adults. From this perspective, individual lives are best understood in the context of social institutions, such as families, the workplace, and early care and education settings.
Emmy Howe,
Ph.D.
S.E.E.D. (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity) Project
The S.E.E.D. Project establishes teacher-led faculty development seminars in order to make school curricula more gender-fair and multicultural.
Peggy McIntosh, Ph.D.
Improving Teacher
Quality through S.E.E.D:
Seeking Educational
Equity and Diversity
The aim of this three-year initiative is to expand the National SEED Project on Inclusive Curriculum, and make its model of schooling inclusiveness for all children and families, including its innovative teaching practices, more widely known and available to educators in the United States. The SEED Project will double from 40 to 80 its summer training of teachers and parents to lead SEED seminars in their communities, and will also enable educators from 18 rural and urban schools which serve the most vulnerable populations the opportunity to start SEED seminars without paying the usual fees to participate and integrate SEED work into their underserved communities.
Michelle Porche, Ed.D.
Evidence Based Participatory Pilot Study for the Implementation of Dual Diagnosis Treatment in a Residential Drug Treatment Program for Latino Men
This needs assessment uses patient chart review factors related to successful residential drug treatment of Latino men with dual diagnosis and gathers information from clients, counselors and administrators, and families on treatment and training needs.
Michelle Porche, Ed.D.
Gender, Achievement,
and Risk
What effects do childhood adversity, gender bias, and trauma have on academic success and healthy gender socialization? All too often, students slip through the cracks, unrecognized in schools and mental health systems. This study will provide information to further develop a theoretical model for understanding the effects of childhood trauma on disrupted learning, as well as provide guideposts for the creation of effective educational practices.
Michelle Porche, Ed.D.
Gender, Social Learning, and Adversity: Factors in Adolescent Development
of Substance Use Disorders
This study examines the influence of gender, adversity, and social learning on the development of drug and alcohol-use patterns in a sample of adolescents undergoing in-patient treatment for drug and/or alcohol abuse. Mixed qualitative and quantitative research methods will be used to examine variations in the trajectories and narratives of adolescents with a range of drug-use severity and primary drug of choice/addiction.
Joanne Roberts,
Ph.D.,
Wendy Wagner
Robeson, Ed.D.
State Advisory Council on Early Childhood Education and Care Needs Assessment
The purpose of this needs assessment is to inform the
Massachusetts Board of Early Education and Care (EEC) of the resources that will best serve families and communities in supporting the holistic development of children, youth, and families.
Joanne Roberts,
Ph.D.,
Wendy Wagner
Robeson, Ed.D.
Developing and Validating Practical Teacher Assessments for Use in Centerbased Prekindergarten Programs
Working families rely on stable, affordable, quality child care to support their successful participation in the workforce. However, existing tools for evaluating teacher effectiveness are outdated and not aligned with current professional standards of good practice, limiting accurate assessment of professional development and training. With the goal of informing and improving classroom instructional policies and practices, this project will develop instruments for assessing teachers’ educational beliefs and knowledge of early childhood development.
Wendy Wagner
Robeson, Ed.D.
Family Income, Infant Child Care and Child Development
This study is part of a larger research program addressing important issues of quality and cost in early child care and education. A random sample of 200 infants and their families from 100 child care centers caring for infants in Massachusetts will be studied to explore links among poverty, family characteristics, quality and cost of child care, family outcomes, and infant development.
Nan D. Stein,
Ed.D.
A Dating Violence Prevention Program for Each Grade in Middle School: A Longitudinal
Multi-Level Experiment
The goal of this study is to increase the capacity of schools to prevent Dating Violence/Harassment (DV/H) by evaluating the effectiveness of current multi-level DV/H prevention programming in middle schools within a large urban school district.