Corinne Gartner

cgartner@wellesley.edu

(781) 283-3895
Philosophy
B.A., M.A., Stanford University; Ph.D., Princeton University



Corinne A. Gartner
Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Works on ancient Greek philosophy, with emphasis on ancient ethics and moral psychology.


My research is in ancient philosophy. I am primarily interested in issues in ancient ethics and moral psychology. For ancient thinkers, however, these topics were often not divorced from metaphysical and epistemological commitments.  It is important to consider ancient ethical views from within the framework of the system under investigation, and to draw connections among various aspects of a thinker’s system.

y dissertation examined Aristotle’s account of friendship in the Eudemian Ethics, which has received very little scholarly attention, in large part because it was thought spurious until the early twentieth century. I envision this as part of a larger project on the content and methodology of the Eudemian Ethics, in contrast with both the Nicomachean Ethics and the Magna Moralia.  
I am currently working on another smaller project concerning the possibility of palingenesis in the context of Lucretius’ argument, in De Rerum Natura, that death is nothing to us.
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My dissertation examined Aristotle’s account of friendship in the Eudemian Ethics, which has received very little scholarly attention, in large part because it was thought spurious until the early twentieth century. I envision this as part of a larger project on the content and methodology of the Eudemian Ethics, in contrast with both the Nicomachean Ethics and the Magna Moralia.  I am currently working on another smaller project concerning the possibility of palingenesis in the context of Lucretius’ argument, in De Rerum Natura, that death is nothing to us.

I teach courses in ancient philosophy and ethics, including Introduction to Moral Philosophy and Ancient Greek Philosophy, and seminars in ancient philosophy.

I participate in a Boston area junior ancient philosophy workshop group and also attend Boston area colloquia on ancient philosophy. 

When I am not pondering Platonic Forms (and sometimes when I am pondering Platonic Forms), I enjoy entertaining my demanding menagerie. I also like all outdoor activities, movies (by Jane Campion and Mike Leigh, among others), and reading literary fiction.