Faculty & Staff

  • Jessica Polito

    Lecturer in the Quantitative Reasoning Program

    B.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)

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  • Corrine Taylor

    Senior Lecturer in the Quantitative Reasoning Program ; Director, Quantitative Reasoning Program

    B.A., College of William and Mary; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin (Madison)

    Leading efforts to improve quantitative reasoning, teaching QR and economics of education, and providing professional development for secondary school teachers.

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Lawyers rely on careful logic to build their cases on subtle arguments about probability to establish or refute "reasonable doubt".
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The stunning impact of computer graphics in the visual arts (film, photography, sculpture) has made parts of mathematics, especially calculus, geometry, and computer algorithms, very important in a field that formerly was relatively unquantitative.
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