Math

Session I  (Please Check Specific Dates)

 

MATH 101 - Reasoning with Data: Elementary Applied Statistics

Alex Diesl, Assistant Professor of Mathematics

 

Please note this is a 6-week course beginning June 2 and ending July 11

An introduction to the fundamental ideas and methods of statistics for analyzing data. Topics include descriptive statistics, basic probability, inference and hypothesis testing. Emphasis on understanding the use and misuse of statistics in a variety of fields, including medicine and both the physical and social sciences. This course is intended to be accessible to those students who have not yet had calculus.

 

Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have completed MATH 205, except by permission of the instructor.  Not open tostudents who have taken or are taking MATH 101Z, POL 199, QR 180, ECON 103/SOC 190, or PSYC 205.

Time: M, T, W, Th (10am-12pm)
Location: Science Center 264

Credit: 1.0 unit (4 sem. hrs.)

Tuition: $2,375

Registration Fee: $50 (non-refundable)

 


 

Session I  (June 2 - June 27)

 

MATH 116 - Calculus II

Andrew Schultz, Assistant Professor of Mathematics

The course begins with applications and techniques of integration. It probes notions of limit and convergence and adds techniques for finding limits. Half of the course covers infinite sequences and series, where the basic question is: What meaning can we attach to a sum with infinitely many terms and why might we care? The course can help students improve their ability to reason abstractly and also teaches important computational techniques. Topics include integration techniques, l'Hôpital's rule, improper integrals, geometric and other applications of integration, theoretical basis of limits and continuity, infinite series, power series, and Taylor series. MATH 116 is the appropriate first course for many students who have had AB calculus in high school.

PrerequisiteMATH 115 or the equivalent

Distribution: Mathematical Modeling

Times: T, W, F (9am-12pm)

Location: SCI 392

Credit: 1.0 unit (4 sem. hrs.)

Tuition: $2,375

Registration Fee: $50 (non-refundable)

 

MATH 205 - Multivariable Calculus 

Steven Simon, Visiting Lecturer

Most real-world systems that one may want to model, whether in the natural or in the social sciences, have many interdependent parameters.  To apply calculus to these systems, we need to extend the ideas and techniques of MATH 115 and MATH 116 to functions of more than one variable.  Topics include vectors, matrices, determinants, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, curves, functions of several variables, partial and directional derivatives, gradients, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, line integrals, and Green's Theorem.

Prerequisite: Math 116, MATH 120, or the equivalent.  Not open to students who have completed PHYS 216.

Distribution: Mathematical Modeling

Times: M - Th. 9:30 - Noon

Location: SCI 364

Credit: 1.0 unit (4 sem. hrs.)

Tuition: $2,375

Registration Fee: $50 (non-refundable)

 

 


 

Session II  (June 30 - July 25)

 

MATH 115 - Calculus I

Ismar Volic, Associate Professor of Mathematics

Introduction to differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. The heart of calculus is the study of rates of change. Differential calculus concerns the process of finding the rate at which a quantity is changing (the derivative). Integral calculus reverses this process. Information is given about the derivative, and the process of integration finds the “integral,” which measures accumulated change. This course aims to develop a thorough understanding of the concepts of differentiation and integration, and covers techniques and applications of differentiation and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions. MATH 115 is an introductory course designed for students who have not seen calculus before.

Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.  Not open to students who have completed MATH 116, MATH 120 or the equivalent.

Distribution: Mathematical Modeling

Times: M, W, Th. 9:00 - Noon

Location: SCI 364

Credit: 1.0 unit (4 sem. hrs.)

Tuition: $2,375

Registration Fee: $50 (non-refundable)

 

 

 

Contact Us

Summer Session
Wellesley College
106 Central Street
Wellesley, MA 02481
 

Corinne Frazer
Director
cfrazer@wellesley.edu
Tel: 781.283.2200


Sandra Poitras
Assistant
spoitras@wellesley.edu
Tel: 781.283.2756