Pre-College Courses

Pre-College Courses

Please choose one Writing Course - AM or PM and one Elective Course.   Please note: Writing courses are mandatory credit/non-credit http://www.wellesley.edu/registrar/registration/creditnon).

Writing Courses


WRIT 121 - 01 Almost Touching the Skies

Course: WRIT 121 - 01 
CRN: 35013
Title: Almost Touching the Skies: Women's Coming of Age Stories
Credit Hours: Credit/Non
Description:

This course will examine what it means to come of age as a woman in contemporary America by focusing on how the narrative has changed since the 1880's. Through a variety of readings by writers anthologized in Almost Touching the Skies, including Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Cade Bambara, Shirley Goek-lin Lim, Kate Chopin and Louise Meriwether, we will look at how the stories we read shape us, and how we, in turn, write our own stories. In so doing, we both conform to an established tradition and create a new one. We will pay particular attention to how to weave an original tale against the backdrop of an unfamiliar history.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None.
Distribution(s): Writing
Instructors: Heather Bryant
Meeting Time(s): Pendleton Hall East 251 - MTTh 01:30 pm - 04:00 pm

WRIT 121-02 Almost Touching the Skies

Course: WRIT 121 - 02
CRN: 35014
Title: Almost Touching the Skies: Women's Coming of Age Stories
Credit Hours: Credit/Non
Description: This course will examine what it means to come of age as a woman in contemporary America by focusing on how the narrative has changed since the 1880's. Through a variety of readings by writers anthologized in Almost Touching the Skies, including Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Cade Bambara, Shirley Goek-lin Lim, Kate Chopin and Louise Meriwether, we will look at how the stories we read shape us, and how we, in turn, write our own stories. In so doing, we both conform to an established tradition and create a new one. We will pay particular attention to how to weave an original tale against the backdrop of an unfamiliar history.
Max. Enrollment: 15
Instructors: Heather Bryant
Meeting Time(s): Pendleton Hall East 251 - M T Th 09:30 am - 12:00 pm

 

Elective Courses


ARTS 105 01 - Drawing I

Course: ARTS 105 - 01
CRN: 35002
Title: Drawing I
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

A foundational course in observational drawing with attention to the articulation of line, shape, form, gesture, perspective, and value. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and observational methods while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression. In-class drawing exercises and weekly homework assignments address a range of subjects with brief attention given to the human figure. Recommended for all students considering majors in the visual arts and required for those majoring in studio art or architecture. Aimed for first- and second-year students; juniors and seniors should check the Art Department website for override application forms.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None.
Distribution(s): Arts, Music, Theatre, Film and Video
Instructors: Candice Ivy
Meeting Time(s): Jewett Art Center 247 - MTW 02:00 pm - 06:00 pm


ENG 112 01 Intro to Shakespeare

Course: ENG 112 01
CRN: 35004
Title: Introduction to Shakespeare
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

Shakespeare wrote for a popular audience and was immensely successful. Shakespeare is also universally regarded as the greatest playwright in English. In this introduction to his works, we will try to understand both Shakespeare's popularity and greatness. To help us reach this understanding, we will focus especially on the theatrical nature of Shakespeare's writing. The syllabus will likely be as follows: Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, Othello, King Lear, and The Winter's Tale.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): None
Instructors: Sarah Wall-Randell
Meeting Time(s): Jewett Art Center 450 - TWTh 09:00 am - 12:00 pm

 

MATH 115 01 - Calculus I

Course: MATH 115 - 01
CRN: 35005
Title: Calculus I
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

Introduction to differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. The heart of calculus is the study of rates of change. Differential calculus concerns the process of finding the rate at which a quantity is changing (the derivative). Integral calculus reverses this process. Information is given about the derivative, and the process of integration finds the "integral," which measures accumulated change. This course aims to develop a thorough understanding of the concepts of differentiation and integration, and covers techniques and applications of differentiation and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions. MATH 115 is an introductory course designed for students who have not seen calculus before.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Distribution(s): Mathematical Modeling
Instructors: Stephen Simon
Meeting Time(s): Science Center 264 - TWThF 01:30 pm - 04:00 pm


PSYC 101 01 - Intro to Psychology

Course: PSYC 101 01
CRN: 35006
Title: Introduction to Psychology
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

An introduction to some of the major subfields of psychology, such as developmental, personality, abnormal, clinical, physiological, cognitive, cultural, and social psychology. Students will explore various theoretical perspectives and research methods used by psychologists to study the origins and variations in human behavior.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Social and Behavioral Analysis
Instructors: Julie Norem
Meeting Time(s): Pendleton Hall East 139 - TWTh 09:30 am - 12:10 pm

 

REL 108 01 - Intro to Asian Religions

Course: REL 108 01 
CRN: 35007
Title: Introduction to Asian Religions
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

An introduction to the major religions of India, Tibet, China, and Japan with particular attention to universal questions such as how to overcome the human predicament, how to perceive ultimate reality, and what is the meaning of death and the end of the world. Materials taken from Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto. Comparisons made, when appropriate, with Hebrew and Christian Scriptures.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy
Instructors: T. James Kodera
Meeting Time(s): Pendleton Hall East 127 - MTW 10:00 am - 12:40 pm

 

SOC 102 01 - Sociological Perspective: Intro to Sociology

Course: SOC 102 - 01
CRN: 35008
Title: The Sociological Perspective: An Introduction to Sociology
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

Thinking sociologically enables us to understand the intersection of our individual lives with larger social issues and to grasp how the social world works. Students in this course will become familiar with the background of sociology and the core analytical concepts employed by sociologists. Students will also gain familiarity with the major substantive topics explored by sociology, with focused attention given to the study of cultural formation, social identities, social control, social inequality, and globalization.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Social and Behavioral Analysis
Instructors: Markella Rutherford
Meeting Time(s): Pendleton Hall East 339 - MTWTh 10:00 am - 12:00 pm


THST 101 01 - Can We Have An Argument?

Course: THST 101 - 01
CRN: 35011
Title: Can We Have an Argument? Understanding, Employing, and Delivering Sound Rhetoric
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

This course will apply theatrical performance training to the art of public speaking or rhetoric. One of the three original Liberal Arts, the art of discourse has long been recognized as fundamental to the creation of knowledge, and the development of thought. Employing dramatic and nondramatic texts, original student-written work, and an occasional Saturday Night Live sketch, students will discover the power of words to change hearts and minds, as well as their ability to undercut the speaker who does not know how to use them properly. The course is intended to develop communicative and expressive skills in students who might not be drawn to the fine arts, but who might benefit from theatrical training to become more effective thinkers, writers, and speakers.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Arts, Music, Theatre, Film and Video
Instructors: Diego Arciniegas
Meeting Time(s): Alumnae Hall JONES - MWTh 01:30 pm - 04:00 pm

 

WGST 120 01 - Intro to Women's & Gender Studies

Course: WGST 120 - 01
CRN: 35012
Title: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies with an emphasis on an understanding of the "common differences" that both unite and divide women. Beginning with an examination of how womanhood has been represented in myths, ads, and popular culture, the course explores how gender inequalities have been both explained and critiqued. The cultural meaning given to gender as it intersects with race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality will be studied. This course also exposes some of the critiques made by women's studies' scholars of the traditional academic disciplines and the new intellectual terrain currently being mapped.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Language and Literature
Social and Behavioral Analysis
Instructors: Nancy Marshall
Meeting Time(s): Pendleton Hall East 127 - MWTh 01:30 pm - 04:00 pm

 

Contact Us

Summer Session
Wellesley College
106 Central Street
Wellesley, MA 02481
 

Corinne Frazer
Director
cfrazer@wellesley.edu
Tel: 781.283.2200


Sandra Poitras
Assistant
spoitras@wellesley.edu
Tel: 781.283.2756