All Pre-College students must choose one Writing Course and one Elective Course. Please note: Writing courses are mandatory credit/non-credit (http://www.wellesley.edu/registrar/registration/creditnon).

 

Summer 2017 Courses for Pre-College Students

 

ARAB 101 01 - Intensive Elementary Arabic 101

Course:

ARAB 101 - 01

CRN:

35021

Title:

Elementary Arabic

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

An introduction to the Arabic language. The course takes a comprehensive approach to language learning and emphasizes the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to the principles of grammar, taught how to read and write in the Arabic alphabet, and trained in the basics of everyday conversation. Through the use of a variety of written, video, and audio materials, as well as other resources made available through the Web, the course emphasizes authentic materials and stresses the active participation of students in the learning process.

Meeting times:

MTWThF 9-12

 

ARTS 105 01 -Drawing I

Course:

ARTS 105 - 01

CRN:

35002

Title:

Drawing 1

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

A foundational course in observational drawing with attention to the articulation of line, shape, form, gesture, perspective, and value. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and observational methods while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression. In-class drawing exercises and weekly homework assignments address a range of subjects including the human figure. Recommended for all students and required for those majoring in studio art or architecture.

Meeting times:

MTW 2-6 pm

 

ARTS 109 01 - Basic 2-D Design

Course:

ARTS 109 - 01

CRN:

35003

Title:

Two-Dimensional Design

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

This foundational studio course addresses the issue of composition in two-dimensional media. It focuses on the fundamental elements of visual design (e.g., line, shape, value, space, color) and their compositional impact. Studio projects emphasize visual problem-solving skills as a means of achieving more effective communication, with some attention to the issues of typography. Assignments explore a range of media, including digital processes.

Meeting times:

MTW 8 am - 12 pm

 

CLCV 104 01 - Classical Mythology

Course:

CLCV 104 - 01

CRN:

35004

Title:

Classical Mythology

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

Achilles' heel, the Trojan Horse, Pandora's Box, an Oedipal complex, a Herculean task—themes and figures from classical mythology continue to play an important role in our everyday life. We will read the original tales of classical heroes and heroines as depicted by Homer, the Greek tragedians, Vergil, Ovid, and others. Why do these stories continue to engage, entertain, and even shock us? What is the nature and power of myth? Readings from ancient sources in English translation.

Meeting times:

TWTh 1:30 - 4 pm

 

ENG 112 01 - Intro to Shakespeare

Course:

ENG 112 - 01

CRN:

35006

Title:

Introduction to Shakespeare

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

Shakespeare wrote for a popular audience and was immensely successful. Shakespeare is also universally regarded as the greatest playwright in English. In this introduction to his works, we will try to understand both Shakespeare’s wide appeal and his literary greatness. We will read five of his greatest plays—A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Othello, and The Winter's Tale. Since Shakespeare’s texts possess a dimension of meaning that can only be revealed in performance, we will also study versions of each play on film.

Meeting times:

MTTh 1:30 - 4

 

ENG 113 01 - Studies in Fiction

Course:

ENG 113 - 01

CRN:

35007

Title:

Studies in Fiction

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

A journey into worlds of fiction that range from grimy and scandalous to fantastic and sublime.  As we enter wildly different fictional worlds, we will also think about how those worlds illuminate ours.  The syllabus will likely include Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment, Richard Wright’s Native Son, Ian McEwan’s Atonement and Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things​. Taught primarily in lecture, this course will not be writing-intensive.

Meeting times:

TWTh 9:50 - 12:20

 

PSYC 101 01 - Intro to Psychology

Course:

PSYC 101 - 01

CRN:

35013

Title:

Introduction to Psychology

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

An introduction to some of the major subfields of psychology, such as developmental, personality, abnormal, clinical, physiological, cognitive, cultural, and social psychology. Students will explore various theoretical perspectives and research methods used by psychologists to study the origins and variations in human behavior.

Meeting times:

TWTh 10:00 - 12:30

 

SOC 102 01 - Soc Perspective: Intro to Soc

Course:

SOC 102 - 01

CRN:

35014

Title:

The Sociological Perspective: An Introduction to Sociology

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

Thinking sociologically enables us to understand the intersection of our individual lives with larger social issues and to grasp how the social world works. Students in this course will become familiar with the background of sociology and the core analytical concepts employed by sociologists. Students will also gain familiarity with the major substantive topics explored by sociology, with focused attention given to the study of social structures, material, cultural, and institutional explanations of social action, and using concepts for real world problem solving.

Meeting times:

MTWTh 10 - 12 pm

 

THST 101 01 - Can We Have An Argument?

Course:

THST 101 - 01

CRN:

35017

Title:

Can We Have an Argument? Understanding, Employing, and Delivering Effective Rhetoric

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

This course will apply theatrical performance training to the art of public speaking or rhetoric. One of the three original Liberal Arts, the art of discourse has long been recognized as fundamental to the creation of knowledge, and the development of thought. Employing dramatic and nondramatic texts, original student-written work, and an occasional Saturday Night Live sketch, students will discover the power of words to change hearts and minds, as well as their ability to undercut the speaker who does not know how to use them properly. The course is intended to develop communicative and expressive skills in students who might not be drawn to the fine arts, but who might benefit from theatrical training to become more effective thinkers, writers, and speakers.

Meeting times:

TWTh 9:50 - 12:20 pm

 

WGST 120 01 - Intro to Women's & Gender Stud

Course:

WGST 120 - 01

CRN:

35018

Title:

Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies with an emphasis on an understanding of the "common differences" that both unite and divide women. Beginning with an examination of how womanhood has been represented in myths, ads, and popular culture, the course explores how gender inequalities have been both explained and critiqued. The cultural meaning given to gender as it intersects with race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality will be studied. This course also exposes some of the critiques made by women's studies' scholars of the traditional academic disciplines and the new intellectual terrain currently being mapped.

Meeting times:

MWTh 1:30 - 4 pm

 

WRIT 155 01 - The Selfie in American Life

Course:

WRIT 155 - 01

CRN:

35019

Title:

The Selfie in American Life

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

This course will examine how the rapid‐fire pace of technology is changing the way we see ourselves, the way we present ourselves to the world, and our fundamental understanding of our relation to the world around us. Through the use of social media platforms like Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, Vine, Pinterest, Yik Yak,Tinder, Hinge, Instagram, and Tumbler, to name just a few, we are all constantly forming and reforming our identities, thereby changing the nature of human experience. By altering the course of our lives, we are reformulating the age‐old questions: How do we discover who we are? How do we show the world who we are? We will read a series of books, traditional and untraditional, by discovered and undiscovered authors, to analyze the way this seismic shift is being documented and portrayed in fiction and non‐fiction.

Meeting times:

MTTh 9:30 - 12:00

 

WRIT 155 02 - The Selfie in American Life

Course:

WRIT 155 - 02

CRN:

35020

Title:

The Selfie in American Life

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

This course will examine how the rapid‐fire pace of technology is changing the way we see ourselves, the way we present ourselves to the world, and our fundamental understanding of our relation to the world around us. Through the use of social media platforms like Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, Vine, Pinterest, Yik Yak,Tinder, Hinge, Instagram, and Tumbler, to name just a few, we are all constantly forming and reforming our identities, thereby changing the nature of human experience. By altering the course of our lives, we are reformulating the age‐old questions: How do we discover who we are? How do we show the world who we are? We will read a series of books, traditional and untraditional, by discovered and undiscovered authors, to analyze the way this seismic shift is being documented and portrayed in fiction and non‐fiction.

Meeting times:

MTTh 1:30 - 4:00

 

WRIT 100 - Studies in Memoir

Course:

WRIT 100

CRN:

35022

Title:

Studies in Memoir

Credit Hours:

1

Description:

In this course, students will read celebrated memoirs that are noteworthy for both their writing styles and the stories they tell. These memoirs include works by African American, Mexican American, Indian American and Chinese American authors who offer diverse perspectives on the joys and challenges of young adulthood. Ideas about language and literature take center stage in many of our readings, and we will pay attention to how these themes guide our authors’ attempts to arrive at collective truths through self-exploration. We will also delve into the texts to determine why literary elements essential to fiction--such as character development, dialogue, and metaphor--are also important in creative nonfiction. We will then put these lessons into practice, writing analyses of the texts as well as our own brief memoirs.

 

Meeting times:

TWTh 9:30 - 12:00