Pre-College Courses

Pre-College Courses

Please Choose from One of the Two Writing Courses and One Elective Course.   Please note: Writing courses are mandatory credit/non-credit - http://www.wellesley.edu/registrar/registration/creditnon).

Writing Courses
WRIT 136 01 - Staging Science

Course: WRIT 136 - 01
CRN: 30518
Title: Staging Science
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

We will read a range of twentieth-century plays that depict various scientific disciplines, discoveries, controversies, and characters. We will explore how scientific themes and ideas shape the structure and performances of these plays and also what these plays tell us about the connections—and misperceptions—between the humanities and sciences. Through plays such as Michael Frayn’s Copenhagen, Tom Stoppard’s Arcardia, David Auburn’s Proof, and David Feldshuh’s Miss Evers’ Boys, we will consider, for example, the intersections of science and politics, ethical responsibility, scientific racism, the gendering of scientific fields and practices, the myth of the lone scientist, and the overlaps between scientific and artistic creation. This course will likely offer the opportunity to attend a local performance of a play. Writing assignments include a personal blog, a theatrical “scene,” two analytic essays, a researched paper, and a performance review.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None.
Distribution(s): Writing
Instructors: Anne Brubaker
Meeting Time(s): Founders Hall 227 - TWF 09:00 am - 12:00 pm


WRIT 150 01 - Fantastic Fictions

Course: WRIT 150 - 01
CRN: 30519
Title: Fantastic Fictions
Credit Hours: 1
Description: When fiction blurs or crosses the line between our "real" world and "other worlds," the reader (as well as the narrator or main character) has entered the realm of "the fantastic," a genre that (broadly interpreted) contains "the uncanny," "the ghost story," and "magical realism." We will read and write about "fantastic" short fiction by nineteenth-century, twentieth-century, and twenty-first century masters of the genre. Authors: Nikolai Gogol, Henry James, Franz Kafka, Gabriel Garcia-Marquez, Yasunari Kawabata, Aimee Bender, and Karen Russell.
Max. Enrollment: 15
Instructors: Marilyn Sides
Meeting Time(s): Founders Hall 227 - MWTh 01:00 pm - 03:30 pm

 

Elective Courses


ARTS 105 01 - Drawing I

Course: ARTS 105 - 01
CRN: 30502
Title: Drawing I
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

A foundational course in observational drawing with attention to the articulation of line, shape, form, gesture, perspective, and value. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and observational methods while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression. In-class drawing exercises and weekly homework assignments address a range of subjects with brief attention given to the human figure. Recommended for all students considering majors in the visual arts and required for those majoring in studio art or architecture. Aimed for first- and second-year students; juniors and seniors should check the Art Department website for override application forms.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None.
Distribution(s): Arts, Music, Theatre, Film and Video
Instructors: Candice Ivy
Meeting Time(s): Pendleton Hall West 310 - MTW 02:00 pm - 06:00 pm

ITAS 102 01 - Elementary Italian II
 

Course: ITAS 102 - 01
CRN: 30507
Title: Elementary Italian
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

These courses focus on the development of basic language skills through the study of grammar. Viewing of language video programs, television programs, and films; listening to traditional and modern songs; and reading of passages and short stories, writing of compositions and oral presentations on cultural topics offer an introduction to Italy and its culture. Three periods.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): ITAS 101
Distribution(s): None
Instructors: Serena Grattarola
Meeting Time(s): Founders Hall 128 - MTWTh 09:00 am - 12:15 pm

MATH 115 01 - Calculus I

Course: MATH 115 - 01
CRN: 30508
Title: Calculus I
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

Introduction to differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. The heart of calculus is the study of rates of change. Differential calculus concerns the process of finding the rate at which a quantity is changing (the derivative). Integral calculus reverses this process. Information is given about the derivative, and the process of integration finds the "integral," which measures accumulated change. This course aims to develop a thorough understanding of the concepts of differentiation and integration, and covers techniques and applications of differentiation and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions. MATH 115 is an introductory course designed for students who have not seen calculus before.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Distribution(s): Mathematical Modeling
Instructors: Ismar Volic
Meeting Time(s): Science Center 364 - MWTh 09:00 am - 12:00 pm


PHIL 103 01 - Self & World:Intro to Metaphysics and Epistemology

Course: PHIL 103 - 01
CRN: 30509
Title: Self and World: Introduction to Metaphysics and Epistemology
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

This course introduces basic philosophical methods and concepts by exploring a variety of approaches to some central philosophical problems. Topics covered include the existence of God, the relation between reason and faith, skepticism and certainty, theories of knowledge, the relation between mind and body, and the compatibility of free will and causal determinism. Readings are drawn from historical and contemporary texts. Discussions and assignments encourage the development of the student's own critical perspective on the problems discussed.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Epistemology and Cognition
Instructors: Eugene Marshall
Meeting Time(s): Founders Hall 307 - MWF 09:00 am - 12:00 pm

PSYC 101 01 - Intro to Psychology

Course: PSYC 101 - 01
CRN: 30510
Title: Introduction to Psychology
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

An introduction to some of the major subfields of psychology, such as developmental, personality, abnormal, clinical, physiological, cognitive, cultural, and social psychology. Students will explore various theoretical perspectives and research methods used by psychologists to study the origins and variations in human behavior.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Social and Behavioral Analysis
Instructors: Julie Norem
Meeting Time(s): Science Center 468 - TWTh 09:30 am - 12:10 pm


SOC 102 01 - Sociological Perspective: Intro to Sociology

Course: SOC 102 - 01
CRN: 30512
Title: The Sociological Perspective: An Introduction to Sociology
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

Thinking sociologically enables us to understand the intersection of our individual lives with larger social issues and to grasp how the social world works. Students in this course will become familiar with the background of sociology and the core analytical concepts employed by sociologists. Students will also gain familiarity with the major substantive topics explored by sociology, with focused attention given to the study of cultural formation, social identities, social control, social inequality, and globalization.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Social and Behavioral Analysis
Instructors: Markella Rutherford
Meeting Time(s): Pendleton Hall East 339 - MTWTh 10:00 am - 12:00 pm


THST 101 01 - Can We Have An Argument?

Course: THST 101 - 01
CRN: 30515
Title: Can We Have an Argument? Understanding, Employing, and Delivering Sound Rhetoric
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

This course will apply theatrical performance training to the art of public speaking or rhetoric. One of the three original Liberal Arts, the art of discourse has long been recognized as fundamental to the creation of knowledge, and the development of thought. Employing dramatic and nondramatic texts, original student-written work, and an occasional Saturday Night Live sketch, students will discover the power of words to change hearts and minds, as well as their ability to undercut the speaker who does not know how to use them properly. The course is intended to develop communicative and expressive skills in students who might not be drawn to the fine arts, but who might benefit from theatrical training to become more effective thinkers, writers, and speakers.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Arts, Music, Theatre, Film and Video
Instructors: Diego Arciniegas
Meeting Time(s): Alumnae Hall AUD - TWTh 01:00 pm - 04:00 pm

 

WGST 120 01 - Intro to Women's & Gender Stud

Course: WGST 120 - 01
CRN: 30517
Title: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Credit Hours: 1
Description:

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies with an emphasis on an understanding of the "common differences" that both unite and divide women. Beginning with an examination of how womanhood has been represented in myths, ads, and popular culture, the course explores how gender inequalities have been both explained and critiqued. The cultural meaning given to gender as it intersects with race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality will be studied. This course also exposes some of the critiques made by women's studies' scholars of the traditional academic disciplines and the new intellectual terrain currently being mapped.

Max. Enrollment: 15
Prerequisite(s): None
Distribution(s): Language and Literature
Social and Behavioral Analysis
Instructors: Nancy Marshall
Meeting Time(s): Pendleton Hall East 127 - MWTh 01:30 pm - 04:00 pm

 

Contact Us

Summer Session
Wellesley College
106 Central Street
Wellesley, MA 02481
 

Corinne Frazer
Director
cfrazer@wellesley.edu
Tel: 781.283.2200


Sandra Poitras
Assistant
spoitras@wellesley.edu
Tel: 781.283.2756