Global Citizenship Internships

Through full-time, immersive placements with international organizations, students gain exposure to a variety cultures, languages, and organizational models, experience with different cross-cultural levels of interaction, recognition of their own ethical viewpoint and sensitivity as community members and emerging leaders in practical decision-making skills, and self-inquiry around cultural intelligence and dynamic competencies through both work and life experiences. With the world population is anticipated to rise to 8 billion people by 2025 and a majority of people living in emerging or developing countries on the Asian and African continent, the importance of developing culturally competent leadership will be critical to the overall success of organizations and communities around the world.

The following internship placements sites may be approved for the Global Citizenship Internships for the Summer 2021. NOTE: Travel to any listed locations are subject to approval by Wellesley College’s International Safety Committee. For many sites, we will not be able to confirm whether internships will be in-person or virtual until Spring term. You may email any questions about placements or their requirements to internships@wellesley.edu.

Eligible class years: Sophmores and Juniors, with the exception of two opportunities for First-Years: The Exploratory with STEMKit in Ghana and Aga Khan Educational Services in Uganda. First-years are eligible. First-Years are eligible to apply to these sites. 

Specific placements include housing paid for by Career Education. These include: Center for Cross Cultural Learning (Morocco), Tangier American LEgation Institute for Moroccan Studies (Morocco), Observer Research Foundation (India), OpAsha (India), and Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust (Puerto Rico, USA). Stipends are lower for these placements because students do not need to pay for housing costs.

2020

  • Campbell Lund, 2023, The Exploratory with STEMKit, Nsawam, Ghana
  • Dominique Mickiewicz, 2022, Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan studies (TALIM), Tangier, Morocco
  • Emily Zhai, 2021, Roots of Health, Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines
  • Jada Allison, 2022, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Jane Kinsella, 2022, Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan studies (TALIM), Tangier, Morocco
  • Julianna Kenny, 2022, Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico, USA
  • Leilani Aguila, 2021, Aga Khan Education Services, Kampala , Uganda
  • Nayanika Das, 2021, The Exploratory with STEMKit, Nsawam, Ghana
  • Olivia Hatten, 2021, Aga Khan Education Services, Kampala , Uganda
  • Renee Chen, 2021, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Sarah Most, 2022, Fundación Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Sophie Lemmerman, 2022, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Victoria Moura, 2022, Fundación Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

2019

  • Aiyana Smith, 2021, Aga Khan Education Services, Kampala , Uganda
  • Amelia Forman, 2021, Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD), San José, Costa Rica
  • Anna Morgan, 2021, Fondation Jardin Majorelle (Yves Saint Laurent), Marrakech, Morocco
  • Cierra Clark, 2020, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Daniela Castro Perez, 2021, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India
  • Devanshi Gupta, 2021, Roots of Health, Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines
  • Dominiki Kurz, 2020, Roots of Health , Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines
  • Emily Prechtl, 2020, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Emma Miller, 2020, The Exploratory with STEMKit, Nsawam, Ghana
  • Evelyn Vivar, 2020, Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico, USA
  • Genevieve (Gen) Brittingham, 2021, Fundación Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Grace Olson, 2021, Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan studies (TALIM), Tangier, Morocco
  • Haruka Ueda, 2020, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Jennifer Duan, 2021, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India
  • Jessie Huang, 2021, Observer Research Foundation, Mumbai, India
  • Angelina Zhang, 2022, The Exploratory with STEMKit, Nsawam, Ghana
  • Vita Solorio-Fielder, 2021, Fundación Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Julia Sokolowska, 2022, Aga Khan Education Services, Kampala , Uganda
  • Laïssa Alexis, 2020, Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan studies (TALIM), Tangier, Morocco M
  • ika Thakkar, 2021, Fondation Jardin Majorelle (Yves Saint Laurent), Marrakech, Morocco
  • Paloma Quiroga, 2021, Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico, USA
  • Rachel Berets, 2021, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Sophia Ashebir, 2021, Observer Research Foundation, Mumbai, India
  • Sydney Kuo, 2020, Roots of Health , Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines

2018

  • Kristen Adams ’20, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Aliza Amin ’20, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Denisse Becerra ’19, United Nations Development Program, San José, Costa Rica
  • Emma Burke ’20, Aga Khan Educational Services, Kampala, Uganda
  • Francesca Dong ‘19, billionBricks, Mumbai, India
  • Clare Doyle ’20, Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Marika Dy ’20, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India
  • Gabby Jerz ’19, Instituto de Presquisas da Biodiversidade, Iporanga, Brazil
  • Elizabeth Lambert ’20, Baan Dada, Sangkhlaburi, Thailand
  • Gabriella Liu ’19, ORT SA CAPE, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Zulia Martinez ’20, Cultural Institute of Puerto Rico, The Fontin Conde de Mirasol Museum, Vieques, Puerto Rico
  • Kimberly Min ’19, Observer Research Foundation, Mumbai, India
  • Luci Navas-Sharry ’19, Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Tine Oginga ’20, Aga Khan Educational Services, Kampala, Uganda
  • Sofia Ramirez ’20, Observer Research Foundation, Mumbai, India
  • Melanie Rumbel ’20, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India
  • Sara Shin ’19, ORT SA CAPE, Cape Town, South Africa

2017

  • Aida L. A. Abou-Zamzam ‘19, Operation ASHA, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
  • Malak Alsayyad ‘19, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Alexandra Beem ‘18, Roots of Health, Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines; The Partnership for Health in Vietnam, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Zoe W. Borghard ‘18, The Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico
  • Adeline H. Du Crest ‘19, Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, Rabat, Morocco
  • Caroline R. George ‘19, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India
  • Darlene Harsono ‘19, Sisters of the Holy Cross Convent, Mungod, India
  • Daniela Kreimerman-Arroyo ‘19, Fundación Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Emma M. Magee ‘19, Asociación de Parálisis Cerebral y Otras Afecciones Similares (ACPACYS), Córdoba, Spain
  • Zoe A. Matticks '18, Roots of Health, Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines; The Partnership for Health in Vietnam, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Monica M. Naranjo DS‘18, Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo, San Jose, Costa Rica
  • Bridget A. Peak ‘19, Parinaam Foundation, Bengaluru, India
  • Silvia E. Pera ‘18, E!State Liberis, Italy
  • Lianet Rosado ‘19, Observer Research Foundation, Mumbai, India
  • Laura C. Scanlon ‘19, Aga Khan Educational Services (AKES), Mumbai, India
  • Janjan Sun ‘19, The Henry Jackson Society, London, England
  • Amelia Tam ‘18, Fundación Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Madeline C. Taylor, Stiftung Frauenkirche Dresden, Germany
  • Hema Venkata ‘19, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India
  • Lucy A. Wanzer ‘19, The Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico
  • Liah L. Watt ‘19, The School of St. Jude, Arusha, Tanzania
  • Naomi L. Whitney-Hirschmann ‘19, Entwicklungspolitisches Netzwerk, Dresden, Germany
  • Rebecca A. Winterich-Knox ‘18, The Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, Italy

2016

  • Erica B. Chalmers ’18, Aga Khan Educational Services, Mumbai, India
  • Olivia B. Duggan ’17, Sisters of the Holy Cross Convent, Mundgod, India
  • Kanupriya Gupta ’18, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India
  • Silpa Karipineni ’18, Operation ASHA, New Delhi, India
  • Amanda S. Lee ’17, Sisters of the Holy Cross Convent, Mundgod, India
  • Maureen J. McCord ’18, Observer Research Foundation, Mumbai, India
  • Grace R. Ming ’18, Observer Research Foundation, Mumbai, India
  • Karen Moorthi ’18, Parinaam Foundation, Bengaluru, India
  • Jessica A. Santero ’17, Sisters of the Holy Cross Convent, Mundgod, India
  • Ivonne L. Marmolejo ’17, United Nations Development Program, San José, Costa Rica
  • Nathalie Cortes ’17, Poder Ciudadano, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Jocelyn M. Santiago ’17, El Museo de Arte de Ponce, Ponce, Puerto Rico
  • Madeline M. Cahillane ’18, Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust (Wintersession), Vieques, Puerto Rico
  • Sofía C. Diaz de Villegas ’17, Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust, Vieques, Puerto Rico
  • Kara M. Banson ’17, Roots of Health, Puerto Princesa, Philippines

Help preserve and promote the rich cultural history and language diversity of Morocco through the most vibrant cities the country has to offer.

MOROCCO

Organization: Center for Cross-Cultural Learning (Rabat)

Available placements: 2

The Center for Cross-Cultural Learning (CCCL) is a private cultural institution directed by Moroccan academics with many years of experience in cross-cultural education. The CCCL organizes a variety of cultural and educational activities which include language courses, seminars and conferences. The CCCL also sponsors art exhibits and musical performances and organizes educational excursions to various parts of Morocco. The aim of these activities is to provide participants with opportunities to learn from the rich cultural diversity of Morocco and to better understand and appreciate the country’s cultural heritage.

Interns may also have an opportunity to engage with Thaqafat Association, the main partner of CCCL. Thaqafat Association is a non-governmental Moroccan organization (NGO) dedicated to fostering cross-cultural respect and appreciation by providing opportunities for people of various backgrounds to exchange their ideas, perspectives, and projects in mutual respect is at the core of Thaqafat’s philosophy. In the early 2000s, CCCL internships were introduced to the college by Professor Rachid Aadnani of the Middle Eastern Studies program. Learn more about CCCL internships from Malak Al-Sayyad ‘19.

What you will learn: As a Program Operations Intern, you will work alongside CCCL and/or Thaqafat staff as they prepare for visitors and events through either organization. Interns gain an inside view of the exhibition process. Tasks will vary depending on the current activities and events of the organization. Skills that you will learn and/or expand upon include:

  • Communications: Prepare materials for seminars and conferences, including presentations; write promotional content such as website copy, social media and other outreach.
  • Information Management: Organize database information for the extensive CCCL library to develop an accessible system for staff and others to navigate materials efficiently.
  • Language and Intercultural Fluency: In addition to the opportunity to learn/practice Arabic and attend lectures through cultural seminars, interns live in homestays arranged by Wellesley Career Education. The Homestay Program offers a unique immersion into the Moroccan society through experiencing daily life, customs, values, and language with a host family.

The CCCL programs are continually evolving which presents opportunities for independently-driven projects. Recent interns have contributed to a diverse array of activities, including production of a documentary film, research and writing for publications, and development of a language-learning mobile app. Although there is no non-English language requirement, Arabic and/or French may be helpful for the day-to-day living experience.

Who are you? Open to Sophomores and Juniors. Ideal candidates will have:

  • Ability to interact with people from diverse backgrounds
  • Initiative to learn and solve problems and work independently, when needed
  • Strong writing and communications skills with attention to detail

 

Organization: Fondation Jardin Majorelle and Musée Yves Saint Laurent (Marrakech)

Available placements: 2

The Fondation Jardin Majorelle (FJM), established in 2001, is a non-profit Moroccan institution that ensures the conservation and functioning of the Jardin Majorelle, the Berber Museum and the musée Yves Saint Laurent marrakech (mYSLm). The Jardin Majorelle is a two and a half acre botanical garden and artist's landscape garden. Housed in a painting studio designed by Paul Sinoir in 1931 for Jacques Majorelle, the Berber Museum features histories, jewels, costumes, weapons, weaving and other decorative objects of the Berber people (Imazighen). The mYSLm includes a permanent exhibition space devoted to the work of Yves Saint Laurent as well as, among other things, a hall for temporary exhibitions, a 140-seat auditorium, and a research library.

The library at the mYSLm is a research center welcoming a broad range of users: Moroccan and foreign researchers, curators, artists and university students. Among its main collections, there's an important and precious mix of rare volumes in French, Arabic or English, dating from the 17th to 21th century, and revolving around Morocco’s history, its geography, culture, identities, literature, traditional arts and craftsmanship, especially regarding the Imazighen. In addition to that, the library holds important collections related to botany, gardens and landscape architecture, both in English and French. Finally, there's a unique holding about fashion, Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé, as the latter donated to the library his most personal books of French Literature, music, arts and, in a broader meaning, Aesthetics. 

FJM internships were introduced to the College in 2019 by Professor Rachid Aadnani of the Middle Eastern Studies program. Read about Mika Thakkar ’21 and Anna Morgan ’21 and their experiences during the pilot year with this placement.

What you will learn: The Digital Archivist and Cultural Programs Interns will gain experience into the general management and functioning of the FJM collections in a variety of settings. Skills that you will learn and/or expand upon include:

  • Research and Writing: Interns will be given the chance to handle rare and important volumes dealing with Morocco in particular and North Africa in general, which constitutes a valuable learning opportunity for students majoring or interested in Middle Eastern or Africana studies. This may include preparing materials for seminars and other events. Through the botanical holding, there also may be opportunities to take on projects related to ecology, plants, and garden design.
  • Information Management: Support management of a specialized research library of materials, including data-entry, cataloging of books and revision of existing bibliographic records.
  • Language and Intercultural Fluency: Learn/practice Arabic language and culture through daily life, customs, values, and interactions.

As most of the library’s holdings are in French, preference will be given to candidates who have very good French/Arabic skills (reading, writing and speaking). Students who are especially interested in Morocco and/or North African histories and cultures, and/or in botanical gardens are encouraged to apply.

Who are you? Open to Sophomores and Juniors. Ideal candidates will have:

  • Ability to interact with people from diverse backgrounds
  • An eagerness to learn and propensity for exploration
  • Strong organizational, communication, and computer skills

 

Organization: Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (Tangier)

Available placements: 2

The Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM), the Moroccan branch of the American Institute for Maghrib Studies (AIMS), is located in the old walled city of Tangier in a charming complex of 45 rooms built around several courtyards. Originally offered as a gift to the U.S. government in 1821 by Moroccan Sultan Moulay Suleiman, the public non-profit has rented this national landmark from the U.S. government. Today, TALIM offers a range of activities, including: operating a museum, collaborating with Moroccan NGOs in social work and renovation in the old city, and functioning as the AIMS research and conference center in Morocco.

The TALIM research library is one of the most important libraries specializing in Morocco, containing a comprehensive collection of books, monographs, maps, photographs, and articles on Morocco and North Africa. Researchers from North Africa, Europe, and the U.S. have made extensive use of the library. The museum has also conducted a popular program for neighborhood women since 1999, including Arabic literacy instruction, sewing/handicraft classes, and foreign language classes taught by volunteers. Nearly two decades ago, TALIM internships were introduced to the college by Professor Rachid Aadnani of the Middle Eastern Studies program.

Read more about life in Tangier from 2016 intern Julide Iye ‘18.

What you will learn: The Cultural Programs Interns will gain experience and insight into the general administration and functioning of the TALIM collections and its ongoing activities. Skills that you will learn and/or expand upon include:

  • Information Management: Projects may include scanning and/or cataloging of materials, and organization of TALIM museum collections and library for accessibility by staff and visitors.
  • Digital Technology: Interns may participate in the creation of videos from music recordings and visual resources relating to them, and the creation of digital resources to highlight the collections. They also may contribute to the blog and other website areas.
  • Language and Intercultural Fluency: Learn/practice Arabic language and culture through daily interactions and customs, Arabic classes offered on-site, as well as community events and festivals which often take place during the summer period.

Students may also work with Aga Khan Documentation Center at MIT (AKDC@MIT) on archiving musical files and/or resources focused on the built environment, the material and visual culture of Morocco and the broader Muslim world. Students with interests in Morocco and/or North Africa are encouraged to apply. Knowledge of French/Arabic/Spanish is preferred but not required.

Who are you? Open to Sophomores and Juniors. Ideal candidates will have:

  • Ability to interact with people from diverse backgrounds
  • An eagerness to learn and propensity for exploration
  • Strong organizational, communication, and computer skills

Gain practical work experience in schools and other educational organizations focused on supporting and enriching the lives of youth and communities across the African continent.

GHANA

Organization: The Exploratory x STEMKit (Nsawam)

Available placements: 2

The Exploratory is a non-profit with a mission to empower educators and inspire students to be curious, courageous and community-minded, by making their experience of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) relevant, joyful, collaborative and equitable. The organization achieves this through hands-on exploratory programming, facilitator workshops for those committed to creating inclusive learning environments, and the delivery of topic-specific “Exploratory Hubs” which include teaching materials and curriculum guides for trained teachers.

Originally launched as SeedKit by Caleb Bercu ‘16, STEMKit was born out of the demand for low-cost learning materials in resource-limited science classrooms. Later joined by Serry Park ‘16, Bianca Morris ‘17, Isabella Narvaez ‘17, Sierra Weingartner ‘17, Mebatsion Gebre ‘18, and Mehak Sarang ‘18, STEMKit formed a partnership with The Exploratory to implement their products in elementary and junior high schools in Nsawam, Ghana and the surrounding area. To learn more, check out a blog post from founders Mehak and Caleb and Issa and 2019 intern, Emma Miller ‘20.

What you will learn: The Research and Development Interns will be immersed in the classrooms, interacting directly with students, teachers, and local staff members of The Exploratory. You will learn and/or expand upon:

  • Professional Networking: Prior to departure, students will be introduced to the protocol development teams of StemKit regarding best practices, former interns, and our partners in Boston. Once on site, interns will meet our partners in the STEM network in Ghana and gain exposure to the education landscape and development at the policy level through the vast STEM network that exists in Ghana, particularly in Accra.
  • Critical Thinking and Research: Alongside implementing STEMKit protocols, interns will design surveys and conduct focus groups to gain insight on improving curricula, materials, and teaching strategies.
  • Communication and Intercultural Fluency: Gain familiarity with Ghanaian culture through daily interactions with staff and students as well as engaging in community events and activities.

In preparation for the experience, interns will gain access to several resources and activities designed to help them maximize their experiences, including STEMKit-driven orientation programming, curated readings, and facilitated introductions to key staff members. Housing will be provided through The Exploratory.

Who are you? Open to First-Years, Sophomores and Juniors. Ideal candidates will have:

  • Ability to interact with people from diverse backgrounds
  • An eagerness to learn and demonstrated interest in STEM fields
  • Collaborative and proactive approach to solving problems
  • Strong organizational and communication skills

Once accepted to the internship, the student will be required to demonstrate commitment (approximately 3 hours per week) to STEMKit on campus during the spring semester.

 

UGANDA

Organization: Aga Khan Education Services Uganda (Kampala) - May Require International Safety Committee Approval

Available placements: 2

Aga Khan Education Services (AKES) is a global network of over 55,000 students in 12 countries throughout Eastern Africa and South and Central Asia and have provided education in these communities for more than a century. AKES has operated schools in Uganda since 1994 when schools were re-opened, having been nationalized by the Ugandan government since the 1970s. AKES Uganda has hosted interns from Wellesley since 2004.

The schools offer students the national curriculum P1–S6, the British National Curriculum at Primary level (Y1-Y6), the International General Certificate in Secondary Education (O-level), and the International Baccalaureate (Diploma Programme) at Higher Secondary School level. The Nursery school has an enriched International curriculum. In some parts of the world, Aga Khan schools provide the only access to formal schooling for girls and young women.

Read about fellowship awardee and Fulbright scholar Faith Fells ‘15 and how her experience with AKES shaped her career growth.

What you will learn: The Education Interns will be immersed in the classrooms, interacting directly with students, teachers, and local staff members of the Aga Khan Nursery Schools, the Primary School and/or the Secondary School. You will learn and/or expand upon:

  • Critical Thinking and Communication: As teacher apprentices, Interns will learn to respond to varying learning styles and the behavior classrooms exhibit, and to effectively convey knowledge and skills through the facilitation of lesson plans.
  • Collaboration: Interns will spend part of each week working with faculty and staff on specific faculty/staff development and curriculum enrichment projects.
  • Adaptability and Emotional Intelligence: To successfully manage a classroom, you will need to be able to observe, interpret, and respond empathetically to inspire, comfort, and build self-esteem among students.

Interns live in a shared apartment near the school compound, which is located in downtown Kampala on Colonel Muammar Gaddafi road (formerly Makerere Road), close to Makerere University. Most residents of the city speak English as well as Luganda and/or Kiswahili. However, there is no language requirement for this placement as classes are conducted in English.

Who are you? Open to First-Years, Sophomores, and Juniors. Ideal candidates will have:

  • Academic interests in one or more of the following: Africana Studies, Education, International Development, and/or Developmental Psychology
  • Demonstrated maturity and ability to tackle projects independently
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Desire to work as a team and use an open-minded approach

Tackle political and community change and advocate for knowledge and resources at the grassroots level or through an internationally-recognized NGO in Latin America. 

ARGENTINA

Organization: Fundación Poder Ciudadano (Buenos Aires)

Available Placements: 1-2

Poder Ciudadano is a not-for-profit, non-partisan organization. It was founded in 1989 by a group of citizens concerned about protecting civil rights in Argentina. The organization’s mission is to promote citizen participation in the governmental process, transparency and the availability of information, and public access to information created by government entities. Poder Ciudadano’s belief is that transparent, public information strengthens democracy and local institutions.

Read more about Clare Doyle ‘20 and Lucí Navas-Sharry ‘19 and their shared experience with Poder.

What you will learn: Interns will work as part of the Political Institutions and Government section of the organization. Skills you will learn and/or expand upon include:

  • Writing: Author or assist in writing reports on political issues at the national level (e.g, campaign finance, political reform, among other subjects). Assist with other projects and publications as needed.
  • Research & Analysis: Conduct research and analysis on topics related to municipal, provincial and national level politics, including topics such as public access to information, governmental corruption and financial crimes, and Argentinian geopolitical relations.
  • Intercultural and Language Fluency: Learn about Argentina’s political system and current issues. Daily reading, writing, and speaking in Spanish in the workplace.

Who are you? Open to Sophomores and Juniors. Interns will need to bring their own laptop. Advanced Spanish reading and writing is required; fluency in speaking is a necessity. Ideal candidates will have the following skills and qualities:

  • Demonstrated interest in politics at the national and international levels
  • Strong research and writing skills
  • Flexibility and ability to take initiative
  • Ability to work independently

     

 

COSTA RICA

Organization: Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD/UNDP) (San Jose)

Available Placements: 1

The United Nations Development Program (UNDP), focuses on helping countries build and share solutions in four areas: Poverty Reduction and Achievement of the Millenium Development Goals; Democratic Governance; Crisis Prevention and Recovery; and Environment and Energy for Sustainable Development.

In all activities, UNDP encourages the protection of human rights and the empowerment of women, minorities, as well as poor and vulnerable populations. In each country office, the UNDP Resident Representative normally also serves as the Resident Coordinator of development activities for the United Nations system as a whole. Through such coordination, UNDP seeks to ensure the most effective use of UN and international aid resources.

Learn more about the UNPD internship from Monica Naranjo DS’19.

What you will learn: The intern will work in the Costa Rica office. She will work with staff to define and implement a project that capitalizes on her strengths and interests, as well as the needs of the organization. Skills you will learn and/or expand upon may include:

  • Research: Compile background research on a variety of issues (including science and technology, production and employment, government spending, and public policies)
  • Writing: Prepare speeches and other communication pieces for PNUD leadership
  • Organization: Organize forums on civil society

Who are you? Open to Sophomores and Juniors with strong Spanish language skills (necessary for office communication). The ideal candidate will have the following skills and/or qualities:

  • A demonstrated interest in international development, UN Millennium development goals, and/or the environment
  • Strong communication skills
  • Strong organization skills
  • Experience with procedural systems a plus

 

PUERTO RICO

Organization: Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust (Vieques)

Available Placements: 1-2

For over thirty years the Vieques Conservation and Historical Trust (VCHT) has been the island's largest non-profit organization dedicated to the conservation of Vieques. Its mission is to foster, protect, and conserve the environmental, archaeological and cultural resources of Vieques. One of the primary goals is to preserve and study the bioluminescent bays found on the island. VCHT supports a broad array of educational programs for the community, with a special focus on children through lectures, educational exhibits, seminars, creative and fun environmental education programs, publications, computer resources, and a unique scholarship program for Viequense students.

The Island of Vieques, only 21 miles long and 5 miles across at its widest point, is located 10 miles off the eastern shore of Puerto Rico. Although it is home to the poorest of all 78 municipalities in Puerto Rico, the communities on Vieques are dedicated to preserving and managing the island’s natural and cultural resources. Every year over 10,000 people visit VCHT’s facilities. VCHT has been hosting Wellesley interns for over a decade. Learn more about the experience from Helena McMonagle ‘16.

What you will learn: The Conservation Interns will promote and carry out VCHT’s mission to increase community engagement in island conservation efforts. This opportunity offers interns a high level of autonomy, allowing them to make significant and high-impact contributions to the organization. Interns often work on multiple projects and initiatives over the course of the summer. As a result, they are expected to have strong time management skills. Before arriving at the site, interns will agree upon specific projects and concrete deliverables with their supervisor. Skills you will learn and/or expand upon may include:

  • Research: Conduct fieldwork with the Bio Bay Research Project (may involve snorkeling to collect marine and freshwater specimens, under the guidance of the VCHT staff)
  • Teaching: Lead children in group educational activities
  • Administrative: Maintain and update the exhibition space, including tank maintenance for marine exhibits. Conduct laboratory and field monitoring work, including beach cleanups, recycling and planting activities. Participate in fairs and excursions.
  • Technical: Assist with computer and photography projects. Provide computer room support.
  • Organization: Edit and organize video and photographic archives.

Who are you? Open to Sophomores and Juniors. Candidates must have a working knowledge of Spanish with strong speaking skills. The ideal candidate will have the following skills and/or qualities:

  • Strong organizational and time management skills
  • Self-motivation and the ability to work independently
  • An interest in biology, marine life, and the environment
  • A passion for the community, especially children
  • Ability to engage in exercise and light physical duties. Swimming, lifting and paddling kayaks will be a routine occurrence

Before starting the internship, interns must ensure their routine vaccinations are up-to-date (MMR, Tdap, varicella, etc.). Hepatitis A, typhoid, rabies are strongly recommended.

Gain hands-on experience and familiarity with processes for increasing access and improving program quality through these incredible opportunities in South and Southeast Asia.

INDIA

Organization: Observer Research Foundation (Mumbai)

Available Placements: 2

Observer Research Foundation (ORF) is a multidisciplinary public policy think tank started in New Delhi in 1990 to be a broad–based intellectual platform for nation–building ideas. Over nearly 30 years, ORF has brought together leading Indian policymakers, academics, public figures, social activists and business leaders to discuss many issues of national importance. ORF’s scholars have made significant contributions towards improving government policies, and have produced a vast body of research on key aspects of national and global significance.

Beginning 2010, ORF Mumbai has been reactivated to pursue the foundation’s vision in India’s financial and business capital. It has started research and advocacy in six broad areas: Education, Public Health, Urban Renewal, Inclusive and Sustainable Development, Youth Development and Promotion of India’s Artistic and Cultural Heritage. Visit the ORF Website to learn more about their current initiatives, and read more about 2016 intern Grace Ming ‘18 and her experience with the think tank.

What you will learn: Interns will have the opportunity to assist on a variety of projects (depending on the work and projects taking place at the time of the internship). Interns can choose to work in any of the six areas in which ORF Mumbai specializes and develop the following skills along the way:

  • Research: Conduct and assist with primary and secondary research across social, economic, health, and/or political landscapes, including data collection, entry and analysis, and assisting with report writing. Work can include designing and conducting surveys, participating in field visits, writing case studies and testimonials, as well as taking minutes of formal meetings.
  • Writing and Communication: Try out various responsibilities including drafting press releases, creating blog entries and publicizing ORF’s events.
  • Intercultural Fluency: Participate in organizational activities (public lectures, conferences, and other exhibits or events)to develop a more holistic understanding of the complex policy landscape in India.

Interns will be provided with relevant training, and a mentor or supervisor will be allocated to them during their time at ORF to assist them with their work and learning.

Who are you? Open to Sophomores and Juniors. Ideal candidates will have the following qualities:

  • Flexible, comfortable taking initiative
  • Strong communication and research skills
  • Articulated interest in policy and social issues
  • Desire to learn about developmental issues in India and South Asia as a region
  • Knowledge of Hindi and Marathi would be an advantage though not essential

Before starting the internship, interns must ensure their routine vaccinations are up-to-date (MMR, Tdap, varicella, etc.).

 

Organization: Operation ASHA (OpAsha) New Delhi

Available Placements: 2

Operation ASHA, the largest and most successful NGO in India, has a mission is to eradicate tuberculosis by bringing high quality treatment to the doorsteps of India’s urban slum communities. OpAsha operates 34 TB DOTS centers covering a population of about 2 million. These centers operate at a convenient time and place for patients who otherwise have no way to access quality services. They provide free treatment and counseling to about 2,000 patients at a time, having successfully treated thousands over the last three years.

Operation ASHA is currently looking to expand its services across both Delhi and North India. Operation ASHA also runs a low-cost community health clinic. The clinic is located in a rag pickers’ colony and treats approximately 300 patients every month. Read more about 2019 interns Daniela Limbania ’21 and Jennifer Duan ’21 and don’t miss an OpASHA blog post from Melanie Rumbel ‘20 and Marika Dy ‘20 from the year before.

What you will learn: Interns will have the opportunity to assist on a variety of projects, developing the following skills along the way:

  • Research: Analyze health services data and develop current assessment and future trends; quantify quality control measures and develop useful reports of patient data; research potential areas of expansion of health services, including having a diagnostic lab and treating MDR-TB
  • Organizational Operations: Learn about organizational strategy for developmental health services, develop working knowledge of non-profit finance, including accounting, costing, and fundraising.
  • Marketing and Communication: Improve the organization’s public visibility through various media outlets
  • Clinical Observation: Work alongside counselors and physicians in slum health centers, observe clinical treatment of patients with TB and other ailments, and conduct detailed quality control checks and develop in-depth understanding of TB DOTS programs

All interns will begin their time with Operation ASHA by visiting treatment centers and being exposed to all functional operations in the organization.

Who are you? Sophomores. Ideal candidates will have the following qualities:

  • Strong research and writing skills
  • Flexible, resourceful and mature
  • Able to work both independently and collaboratively
  • Demonstrated interest in social justice, public health, medicine, and/or socioeconomics

Before starting the internship, interns must ensure their routine vaccinations are up-to-date (MMR, Tdap, varicella, etc.).

 

PHILIPPINES

Organization: Roots of Health (Puerto Princesa, Palawan) - May Require International Safety Committee Approval

Available Placements: 1-2

Roots of Health is dedicated to improving the health of women and girls, and their communities. It is the only non-government organization in Palawan that provides free reproductive health services. Roots of Health operates in three main areas: youth-centered programming, service delivery (e.g., contraceptives, prenatal exams and postpartum checks, and reproductive healthcare), and system strengthening (supporting and strengthening existing government services). Roots of Health’s clinic is located in Puerto Princesa City and is one of the major ways that the organization provides free, confidential, safe and accessible clinical reproductive services. The clinic is a key part of how the organization helps improve women’s reproductive health and decrease the number of unplanned pregnancies. Clinic services provide sexual health education, access to modern contraceptives, family planning counseling, prenatal check ups, and pap smears.

Roots of Health was established in 2009 by Dr. Susan Evangelista and her daughter, Amina Evangelista Swanepoel ‘02. Susan was teaching at Palawan State University (PSU) in Puerto Princesa and was concerned about unplanned pregnancies and the lack of reproductive health knowledge among her students. The two women felt that together they could share reproductive health lessons with women and young people in marginalized communities, thereby improving health and the general quality of life in this impoverished province of the Philippines. Amina introduced RoH internships to Wellesley students in 2014. Learn more about recent experiences from Victoria Rines ‘15 and Wenbo Bai ‘16.

What you will learn: The internship provides an overall experience for anyone interested in public health, sexual health education, or service-delivery in a developing country context. The intern will see firsthand how programming is planned and carried out, and how it is monitored, evaluated and analyzed. The intern will also learn the ins and outs of running a small nonprofit organization and will see how political and cultural factors influence public health outcomes. Before arriving at the internship site, interns will agree upon specific projects and concrete deliverables with their supervisor. Skills you will learn and/or expand upon may include:

  • Teaching and Education: Support sexual health education initiatives; participate in community visits.
  • Research & Writing: Conduct research on topics related to sexual health; assist staff members with grant writing.
  • Technology and Communication: Create social media content to support efforts in sexual education and community outreach.
  • Administrative Support: Provide administrative support as needed. Responsibilities may include conducting internet-based research and preparing materials for team members. 

Who are you? Open to Juniors. Experience with Excel is required. The ideal candidate will have:

  • A strong interest in public health service delivery
  • Excellent organizational, research and problem-solving skills
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Flexibility, patience, and a willingness to help out where needed
  • Initiative and a willingness to learn
  • Fluency in Tagalog is helpful but not required