Italian Department Internships

Students with an effective command of Italian are encouraged to apply for these paid summer internship programs. These are 10-week internships in Italy that come with a stipend of $4,000. Given the on-going pandemic, Wellesley is evaluating whether it will resume funding in-person internships this summer; a decision is expected in April. KitchenFilm and The Peggy Guggenheim Collection will be remote opportunities if an in-person experience is not possible. Libera is currently exploring whether they can offer a remote internship (we will update this page when we receive more information).

How to Apply: Prepare the following materials:

  • Personal Statement (approximately 500 words in English) responding to the following prompts:
    • What you hope to gain from the experience
    • What your education and career goals are and
    • Paragraph briefly discussing any travels abroad you have previously had, especially detailing any time you have spent in Europe or Italy
    • A statement of what financial aid if any you are receiving from Wellesley College
  • Resume
  • Cover letters, addressed to the organization and written in Italian
  • Transcript (unofficial from Workday)

Once completed, please upload all materials via the Centralized Internships Application form.

Students should anticipate interviewing with department faculty before a placement is confirmed.

Application Deadline: March 15, 2021 by 11:30 PM EST (Boston time)

For Summer 2021, the program is able to offer up to 3 sponsored placements among the following organizations:

The company produces and promotes international independent cinema, paying particular attention to topics regarding youth culture and the representation of women in film. The name of the group is a tribute to The Kitchen in New York, where several of the director's previous works were shown in the 1980s.

Where: Director Emanuela Piovano founded Kitchenfilm in Turin in 1988. The aim of the company is to produce and promote international independent cinema, paying particular attention to topics regarding youth culture and the representation of women in film. Kitchenfilm opened its first branch office in Rome in 1994.The name of the group is a tribute to The Kitchen in New York, where several of Piovano’s previous works were shown in the 1980s.

The Aristotelian principle that conception occurs through the act of cooking implies that the kitchen itself is a fertile workshop for ideas. Kitchenfilm takes much of its branding from Aristotle’s ideas: the group’s original symbol was a woman displaying an egg in a frying pan. The logo later developed into an abstract symbol, in which the shapes of a triangle and a circle represent the basic forms of creation. The company focuses on the production, promotion and distribution of films. Recently it has also begun to rent out their cutting edge technology for production and post-production to other companies.

What: The intern will work with the Kitchenfilm staff to enhance and develop Kitchenfilm projects. The intern will also be responsible for supporting the association in a variety of tasks related to production and promotion.

The intern will be expected to:

  • Provide assistance during the planning and execution phases of Kitchenfilm projects
  • Use and maintain the Kitchenfilm database system
  • Support the aims and ethos of Kitchenfilm
  • Undertake professional duties assigned to her by the manager or staff
  • Assist in the daily operation of cinema production
  • Help with administrative tasks, promotion, press, research for the office
  • Engage with Kitchenfilm staff about her role in the office and upcoming projects.

Who: Open to Sophomores and Juniors. Ability to speak Italian required and familiarity with Italian culture is highly preferred. Other preferred qualifications and characteristics include:

  • Work experience in an office setting (preferred); Confident, strong communication skills
  • A documented academic interest in cinema, aesthetic production and literature
  • Technical knowledge of the mechanics of cinema, camerawork, etc. (preferred)
  • Competent knowledge of social networking techniques, including blogs and other promotional mediums.
  • Experience with video editing and graphic design
  • Proficiency in Mac OS and other computer programs (Microsoft Word, Excel, etc.)
  • Highly organized, keen attention to detail, ability to problem solve and multitask
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a cooperative international team
  • Outgoing personality with a great sense of creativity
  • Flexible and adaptable in order to operate effectively in a dynamic work environment.

When: May include occasional weekend or evening hours for events. 300 hours (~2 months) between June and August; summer interns work at least 35 hours per week.

How: Please provide the following materials:

  • Cover letter (in Italian), addressed to Emanuela Piovano
  • Resume
  • Unofficial Transcript

Number of Placements: 1

Stipend: $4,000 - $5,000

Libera is an anti-mafia NGO, achieving their mission through organizing grassroots organizations and forming cooperatives on land and other assets entrusted by the government to local communities for social reuse: these properties were seized by Italian State authorities thanks to a 1996 law. Libera coordinates with local communities to transform these properties into organic farms, cooperatives, and sites for creating micro economic units through local crafts and tourism.

Where: Libera is an anti-mafia NGO, achieving their mission through organizing grassroots organizations and forming cooperatives on land and other assets entrusted by the government to local communities for social reuse: these properties, which previously belonged to the Mafia organization, have been seized by Italian State authorities thanks to a 1996 Italian law. Libera coordinates with local communities to transform these properties into organic farms, cooperatives, and sites for creating micro economic units through local crafts and tourism.

Law n. 109/96 ensures that all property acquired through illegal activities are granted to third parties, i.e. private organizations; cooperatives; municipal, provincial and regional administrations. The third parties then return these assets to the community by converting the properties to socially beneficial uses. During the 19 years since its passing, the law has converted to use for the community more than 4500 real estate properties (apartments, villas and lands). The confiscated lands in Sicily, Calabria, Campania, Puglia, Lazio and all Italy have been taken over by cooperatives of students and citizens, and have produced oil, wine, pasta, taralli, legumes, preserves and other organic goods. Every year on these lands we run international community service work camps.

The phenomenon of organized crime now moves on a global scale in carrying out its illegal activities. It is in this light that Libera responds by building international networks able to connect associations, organizations and grassroots groups across Europe, the Maghreb-­‐Mashreq, and Latin America. E!state Liberi and Libera International have created International Camps for young and adults, offering a unique experience for volunteers from both Italy and abroad to work together and learn about organized crime, social anti-­mafia and issues of transnational importance.

Read a blog by Katie Hoeflinger ‘19 who was the Libera intern in 2016.

What: We plan to host some ad hoc meetings on international issues that affect the activities of the international sector of Libera: the mafia in Europe, the memory of victims, migrants and human trafficking, international antimafia social, drug mafias, international mafias, Mexico and the invisible war, Latin America and the ALAS (Latin American Social Alternative) network. The objective is to integrate the “classical” training provided by the E!state Liberi group with the global issues that are more pertinent to the foreign participants. Two or three meetings per week will be organized to discuss these issues and to listen to eye witnesses or to specific experts. Thanks to the presence of the representative of Libera, we will be able to coordinate various meetings and create a cohesive educational experience for the students.

Description and Types of Activities included in E!state Liberis camp tours:

  1. San Giuseppe Jato (PA) – Sicily: The confiscated property on which Wellesley College and LUISS students will be hosted is a small rural villa seized from Vito Brusca, a mafioso. The property, originally administered by the Development and Legal Consortium formed in August 2000 among the villages of Alto Belice Corleonese, has been managed by the Placido Rizzotto Libera Terra Cooperative since 2011. The property was renovated and reorganized and became a guesthouse to accommodate the Estate Liberi volunteers from San Giuseppe Jato. The house is about 3.9km from San Giuseppe Jato and is surrounded by the beautiful Alto Belice Corleonese countryside. The landscape of this wonderful part of Sicily was nominated for the “Landscape Award of the Council of Europe” in 2013 thanks to a project promoted by Libera, Association Names and Numbers Against the Mafia. The properties on which students will work and the house in which they will be hosted are about 550m above sea level. Camp volunteers will contribute to the day to day work, conducting different types of activities from cleaning or completing structures to simple activities in cultivated fields (which will mainly consist in harvesting at the end of August/beginning of September).  Field management will require volunteers to carry out chores (cooking, cleaning, setting the table and tableware...). These activities will take place alongside other activities that focus on the issues of legality and include meetings with people actively involved in the cooperative (Legacoop is the same co-op as Libera Terra), in the management of confiscated assets (Development and Legality Consortium), the fight against the mafia (Casa Memoria Impastato Addiopizzo), or relevant to the history of these places (survivors of the Portella della Ginestra massacre).

  2. Belpasso (CT) – Sicily: On June 23, 2010, the first Libera Terra cooperative was founded on land in the province of Catania and Siracusa named after Commissioner Beppe Montana who was killed by the mafia in Porticello on July 28, 1985 after having formed the first “catturandi” section of the Palermo flying squad. The new cooperative adheres to the Libera association and adds to other already established projects in the province of Palermo  and to the businesses founded on confiscated property in Calabria and Puglia. For several years the Peppe Montana Cooperative has been participating in the E!state Liberi project by educating participants on issues of antimafia social intervention and by picking oranges and olives. Wellesley College and LUISS students will hosted in the new lodgings on the confiscated property.

  3. Isola Capo Rizzuto (KR) – Calabria: For the last 5 years, volunteer camps have been  held in the town of Isola Capo Rizzuto to help and support the Terre Joniche social cooperative which manages 100 hectares of land confiscated from the Arena clan. Wellesley College and LUISS students will be hosted in a new facility operated by the cooperative which will be adapted for the camp at Ostello and located in the corporate hub. Participants will carry out various types of task depending on the needs of the host or the work schedule for the confiscated land.  On occasion they will participate in the social activities undertaken in collaboration with other local volunteer associations. At the same time they will collaborate with other volunteer groups hosted by the Center for Legal Education and the Environment of Cutro.

  4. San Sebastiano da Po (TO) – Piedmont: “Cascina Bruno and Carla Caccia” is a property confiscated from the mafia in San Sebastion da Po, a municipality located in the hills between Turin and Asti. The property belonged to the ’ndrangheta Belfiore family: Domenico Belfiore was named by several cooperating witnesses as the regent of a mafia association located in the north of the Turin province where Bruno Caccia, a Turinese prosecutor, was carrying out investigations. The property consists of a nineteenth-century remodeled farmstead, a restructured barn, a stable, and a hectare of surrounding land. The property is dedicated to the memory of Bruno Caccia, who was murdered by the ‘ndrangheta, and his wife Carla.  The  order to kill him came from the farmstead and it is thus, a fitting symbol of the fight against the mafia in northern Italy. It is also dedicated to his wife because, as a family member of the victim of the mafia, she long desired to discover the truth about her husband’s murder. The “Cascina Bruno and Carla Caccia” is a space geared toward legal education but also a place open to the people of San Sebastiono and surrounding municipalities. The confiscated property (the largest in northern Italy) is host to self-managed courses and workshops, as well as to the thousands of students from all over Italy who annually visit it. Finally, on the lands, there is a garden area dedicated to a hazelnut plantation and to the rearing of some small farm animals, as well as a bee hive.
     

Who: Open to Sophomores and Juniors. Ability to speak Italian required and familiarity with Italian culture is beneficial, though not necessarily required. Other preferred qualifications and characteristics include:

  • Confident, strong communication skills
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a cooperative international team
  • Outgoing personality with a great sense of creativity
  • Flexible and adaptable in order to operate effectively in a dynamic work environment.
  • When: The program will run for 4 weeks throughout the month of July.  Interns may be expected to work evening or weekend hours.

How: Please provide the following materials:

  • Cover letter (in Italian), addressed to Daniela Bartalesi-Graf
  • Resume
  • Unofficial Transcript

Number of Placements: 1-2

Stipend: $2,000 - 2,500 + student(s) will live in housing arranged by Wellesley Career Education

Interns will gain an in-depth exposure to modern masterpieces by assisting in the daily operation of the museum, with the added opportunity to experience Venice’s premier cultural environment.

Where: The Italy Peggy Guggenheim Collection began in 1980 as an invitation to young people to assist operations in the early days of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection.  It has developed into a competitive international internship program, involving the operation of Italy’s foremost modern art museum. It is the first and the only program of its kind in Italy. The work-study program offers an experience as unique and wide-ranging as the museum itself. The Peggy Guggenheim Collection, endowed with art of the full high Modernist spectrum, is situated in Venice. For young people interested in the arts, a Peggy Guggenheim Collection internship is an opportunity to profit from in-depth exposure to modern masterpieces and from involvement in Venice’s premier cultural environment simultaneously.

The steady expansion of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection from1980 to today parallels a comparable growth in the internship program. The number of students has increased from 6 to as many as 30 students per month. In 2011, of the approximate 1,400 applicants, 157 were successful from 32 different countries. The program is organized by the Manager of Education, together with two former interns who are selected to return for a period of approximately 6 months to manage the daily and weekly activities of the group.

In addition to Peggy Guggenheim’s collection of the classical avant-garde, the museum also presents on permanent display masterpieces from the Gianni Mattioli Collection (Futurism, Modigliani, Morandi) and modern sculpture from the Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection. The permanent collection is integrated by temporary exhibitions.

What: Interns assist in the daily operation of the museum four days a week. They prepare galleries prior to opening, guard the rooms, answer questions from the public, sell tickets and catalogues, and close the museum at the end of the day. Interns are assigned to help staff the offices (administration, public affairs, press, library, publications, registrar research, retail operations). They also act as docents. In particular they may be involved in presentations to visitors and in KIDS’ DAY—guided visits and workshops on Sundays for junior members of the visiting public.

These tasks involve considerable daily responsibility. Part of the experience is, therefore, work of a varied nature. In addition, through its ownership of the US Pavilion, the museum has direct involvement with the US presentation at the Venice Biennale.

Consequently, interns may have the privilege of assisting in the world’s oldest international contemporary art event. Several times a week interns meet for discussions and seminars on art historical or museological issues. These seminars are conducted by the interns themselves as well as by staff members or visiting professionals. Speakers from 2009 – 2011 included: Dr. Philip Rylands (Director, Peggy Guggenheim Collection), Paul Schwartzbaum (Chief Conservator/Conservator for Museum Construction and Overseas Exhibitions, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation), Dario Pinton, Silvio Veronese (Librarian, Peggy Guggenheim Collection), Flavio Fergonzi, Jason Martin, Chiara Barbieri (Director of Special Projects and Publications, Peggy Guggenheim Collection), Fred Wilson, Susan Davidson, Cathy Opie, Stefano Lanuti, Vivien Greene (Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York), Luca Massimo Barbero (Associate Curator, Peggy Guggenheim Collection), Bob Monk, Mike and Doug Starn, Gail Levin, Christiane Löhr, Bill Frakes and Jeremy Miller.

Museum staff speaks regularly to the interns about their role in the museum and upcoming projects. Visits in and outside Venice are planned twice a month to allow interns to view exhibitions and cultural and historical sites in various Italian cities. Interns have the exclusive use of the museum’s library of modern and contemporary art and enjoy enough free time to study privately, attend language courses and lectures, and take trips around Venice and elsewhere in Italy.

More information about the internship program can be found on their website: http://www.guggenheim-venice.it/inglese/education/pdf/internship_more_info.pdf

Who: The following preferred qualifications apply:

  • Juniors preferred
  • Italian language skills preferred; another non-English language is beneficial
  • Independent, outgoing, flexible, great sense of creativity
  • Academic interests should include at least one of the following: background in history, training/interest in arts-related career (applied art, art history, teaching, gallery or auction professions, museum administration, or curatorship)

When: Two months (June and July). Summer interns work at least 35 hours per week. Interns may be expected to work evening or weekend hours.

How: Please provide the following materials:

  • Cover letter, addressed to Federica Gastaldello
  • Resume
  • Unofficial Transcript

Number of Placements: 1

Stipend: $1,000 + 1600€ paid from the museum (museum provides list of available housing options and can connect interns with potential roommates