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students protesting the immigration executive order

Town Hall Meeting: Understanding the Executive Order

A Conversation with an Immigration Attorney
Apr 12, 2017, 5 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

A facilitated town hall with a leading immigration attorney designed to help students, staff, and faculty understand how to navigate the new executive orders.

Generously supported by:

the Office of the President, the Working Group on Immigration Policy, and Slater International Center.

A group of 5 people sitting in a gallery at the Davis Museum.

*Canceled* Mindful Meditation

Feb 19, Mar 18, Apr 15, May 20
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Surround yourself with art, and experience present-moment awareness in this 30 minute meditation session. Guided by Kotatsu John Bailes Roshi, the College’s Buddhist chaplain. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Davis’s permanent collections and special exhibitions and includes a guided meditation.

Meet in the Davis Lobby at 12:30 p.m.

  • February 19
  • March 18 *canceled*
  • April 15 *canceled*
  • May 20 *canceled*

Co-sponsored by the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

image of a porcelain bowl with blue illustration on it

Bowl: Grape and Squirrel Design, Qing dynasty, Kangxi period, early 18th century.

*Cancled* Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month Tour

Drop-in Public Tour
May 2, 2 PM
Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

*This event is canceled due to the COVID-19 outbeak.*

Generously supported by:

the Elizabeth Bein Keto ’48 Endowed Memorial Art Fund.

Image Credit:

Anonymous gift Object No.: 2002.0.12

collage of a renaissance painting of a woman dressed in fancy clothes. one of the collaged images is blurred out

*Canceled* Wellesley Repertory Theatre Presents: “The Last Wife”

By Kate Hennig, Directed by Kelly Galvin
Jun 3–Jun 28
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Ticket information appears below

*This event is canceled due to the COVID-19 outbeak.*

A contemporary retelling of the compelling relationship between Katherine Parr and Henry VIII, “The Last Wife” is a funny, powerful examination of patriarchy, sexual politics, and women’s rights. Kate Parr is smart, confident, and passionate, a rising star in a world of intense competition. But her obligatory marriage to Henry is rife with the threat of violence and lure of deceit; her secret liaisons with Thom, her husband’s former brother-in-law, could send her to an early grave; and her devotion to the education and equal rights of Henry’s daughters is putting an even bigger strain on her marriage. Will Kate risk her life to gain authority in both her relationship and her political career? Which love will she be led to if she follows her heart? And what kind of future will there be for her children if she makes a crucial mistake?

Ticket information:

Show times:

  • Thursdays | 7pm
  • Fridays | 7 pm
  • Saturdays | 2 pm, 7 pm
  • Sundays | 2 pm
students holding peace signs at a immigration rally

*Postponed* Supporting our Undocumented, DACA, and TPS Students

A Workshop with Dr. Lorgia Garcia Peña
Apr 9, 12:45 PM
Alumnae Hall Ballroom
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, this even has been postponed.*

A workshop for Wellesley faculty and staff with Dr. Lorgia Garcia Peña about how to best support undocumented, DACA, and TPS studentsis. National and regional resources will be shared.

Dr. Lorgia Garcia Peña is a professor of Latinx Studies at Harvard University and cofounder of Freedom University in Georgia. She specializes in identity and migration studies and is the award winning author of The Borders of Dominicanidad: Race, Nations and Archives of Contradictions, a study of the impact of stories—historical and fictional—on the national and racial identity of a people.

Please RSVP.

For more information, please contact:

maliceaw@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

The President's Office, the Immigration Working Group, the Office of Intercultural Education, and the CLCLE.

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble

*Canceled* Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble

Kera Washington, Director
May 2, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble will perform the folkloric music and dance of Africa, as it exists today throughout Africa and the African Diaspora, particularly in Haiti, Ghana, Zimbabwe, and Brazil.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Wellesley College BlueJazz performing

Wellesley College BlueJazz

*Canceled*Wellesley BlueJazz Big Band Spring Concert: “Have you Heard?”

Cercie Miller, Director
May 1, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Get on the jazz train this spring, with music of Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and more! The Wellesley College Big Band performs new and classic jazz repertoire with a fresh take, featuring dynamic ensemble passages, big band shouts, and spirited improvisations by soloists. Celebrate jazz this spring with Wellesley BlueJazz, directed by Cercie Miller.

 
For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Wellesley College BlueJazz Ensemble performing

Wellesley College BlueJazz Ensemble

*Canceled* Wellesley BlueJazz Combos Concert: No Walls, No Borders

Apr 24, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Join us for a lively evening as our wonderful instrumentalists and vocalists create the interplay between group and individual expression, weaving in musical influences from around the world, in the best of small ensemble jazz.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Wellesley College Collegium Musicum performance

Wellesley College Collegium Musicum

*Canceled* Collegium Musicum (Early Music Ensemble)

Andrew Arceci, Director
Apr 14, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

The Collegium Musicum is an ensemble of singers and instrumentalists open to Wellesley College students, faculty, staff, and the local community. The Collegium specializes in the performance of Western music from the Middle Ages to the early 19th century. The Collegium is often joined by faculty and outside guest artists who enrich the ensemble for special projects. 

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Place Holder

Brandeis Wellesley Orchestra

*Canceled* The Baum Memorial Concert

Lisa Graham, Conductor
Apr 4, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

For this concert, Wellesley College Choir is joined by Rutgers University Glee Club, Patrick Gardner, Conductor. The highly acclaimed Choral program at Wellesley allows students to experience the exhilaration and joy of performing the great choral repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. National and international tours have led them to perform in venues such as the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., La Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal, and the Mezquita in Cordoba, Spain.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Galen Stone Tower

*Canceled* Change Ringing Open Tower

Margaret Angelini, Director
May 2, 2–4 PM
Galen Stone Tower
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

If you’ve ever wanted to play the bells, here’s your chance! The students lead all visitors in playing simple melodies on the college carillon. Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the tradition of bell ringing, which has continued since the carillon was first installed in 1931. Listen from the academic quad or from Founders 305.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Wellesley College Chamber Music Society performance

Wellesley College Chamber Music Society

*Canceled* Chamber Music Society

David Russell and Jenny Tang, Directors
Apr 26, Apr 30, May 3, May 5, May 6
Various locations
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Founded in 1958, The Chamber Music Society of Wellesley College provides an opportunity for instrumentalists and vocalists to prepare and perform works for small ensembles. Each chamber group receives weekly coaching from a member of the Wellesley College Music Department, and performs at one of several concerts held at the end of each semester.

Chamber Music Marathon: Sunday, April 26, 12 p.m. | Anderson Forum, Lulu

CMS #1: Thursday, April 30, 7 p.m. | Sargent Salon (PNW-101)

CMS #2: Sunday, May 3, 2 p.m. | Jewett Auditorium

CMS #3: Tuesday, May 5, 7 p.m. | Jewett Auditorium

CMS #4: Wednesday, May 6, 7 p.m. | Sargent Salon (PNW-101)

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Brandeis Wellesley Orchestra performing a concert

Brandeis Wellesley Orchestra

*Canceled* Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra Spring Concert: Catch a Rising Star!

Neal Hampton, Conductor
Apr 25, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Catch a Rising Star! Features the Afro American Symphony by William Grant-Still and performances by the winners of the 2019 Concerto Competition.

Program includes:

Mozart Bella Mia Fiamma; Tiffany Sharma ’20, soprano

Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto Mvt 1; Hannah Ryu ’23, violin

William Grant-Still, Afro American Symphony

The Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra is composed of students, faculty, staff, and associates of Wellesley College, Brandeis University and Babson College. Uniting the standards of excellence associated with Wellesley and Brandeis, the orchestra brings inspiring performances of the great orchestral literature—past and present—to a new generation of musicians and audiences.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Wellesley College Choral Program singing

Wellesley College Choral Program

*Canceled* Skylark Ensemble presents Sub Rosa: Secrets Revealed

Special Event presented by and with the Wellesley College Choral Program, Lisa Graham, Conductor
Apr 23, 7 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Ticket information appears below

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

What might happen if Robert Langdon, acclaimed professor of Symbology at Harvard University–and fictional hero of Dan Brown’s best-selling novels, including The Da Vinci Code–were enlisted to explore hidden symbols, secret codes, and long-forgotten historical connections buried in manuscripts of choral music over the centuries? Join Skylark to find out.

Featuring video introductions by author Dan Brown and stunning new music by Gregory W. Brown.

Skylark strives to set the standard for innovative and engaging programs that re-define the choral experience for audiences and singers alike. Artistic Director Matthew Guard’s well-researched and creative programs have been described as “engrossing” (WQXR New York) and “original, stimulating, and beautiful” (BBC Radio 3). Often incorporating extensive research to explore connections to history, literature, art, and other disciplines, Skylark's programs engage the audience in new ways, always trying to provide the appropriate context for pieces to have an authentic emotional impact. The sampling of past programs below, including links to full-color program booklets–artfully designed by Cory Klose–gives you a window into the unique experience of attending a Skylark concert.

Please reserve tickets. Free admission with Wellesley I.D.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Chucho Valdes

Chucho Valdés

*Canceled* Chucho Valdés: A Legend!

Apr 18, 7:30 PM
Alumnae Hall Ballroom
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

The Music Department is honored to welcome the legendary Chucho Valdés for a solo performance at Wellesley College. The Cuban pianist, composer, and arranger is the most influential figure in modern Afro-Cuban jazz. He is the winner of six GRAMMY Awards and four Latin GRAMMY Awards. Valdés received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences and was inducted in the Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2018. Born in a family of musicians in Quivicán, Havana province, Cuba, Dionisio Jesús “Chucho” Valdés Rodríguez, has distilled elements of the Afro-Cuban music tradition, jazz, classical music, rock, and more, into an organic, personal style that has a truly distinct style and substance.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Marjorie Copland Baum Fund, and the Florence Jeup Ford ’22, Mary M. Crawford ’22, and Virginia Ford ’48 Artist in Residence Endowment Fund.

Image Credit:

Carol Friedman

Galen Stone Tower

*Canceled* Spring Recital and Open Tower

Margaret Angelini, Director
Apr 4, 2–4 PM
Galen Stone Tower
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Guest Carillonneurs will perform on the Wellesley College carillon. The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the tradition of bell ringing, which has continued since the carillon was first installed in 1931. All Carillon events are held at Galen Stone Tower. Listen from the academic quad or from Founders 305.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

photoshopped image a starry night sky

*Canceled* Wellesley College Theatre Presents: Silent Sky

By Lauren Gunderson, Directed by Marta Rainer
Apr 23–Apr 26
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Ticket information appears below

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

When Henrietta Leavitt begins work at the Harvard Observatory in the early 1900s, she isn’t allowed to touch a telescope or express an original idea. Instead, she joins a group of women “computers,” charting the stars for a renowned astronomer who calculates projects in “girl hours” and has no time for the women’s probing theories. As Henrietta, in her free time, attempts to measure the light and distance of stars, she must also take measure of her life on Earth, trying to balance her dedication to science with family obligations and the possibility of love. The true story of 19th-century astronomer Henrietta Leavitt explores a woman’s place in society during a time of significant scientific discoveries, when women’s ideas were dismissed until men claimed credit for them. Social progress, like scientific progress, can be hard to see when one is trapped among earthly complications; Henrietta Leavitt and her female peers believed in both, and their dedication changed the way we understand both the heavens and Earth.

Show times:

  • Thursday, April 23 | 7pm
  • Friday, April 24 | 7 pm
  • Saturday, April 25 | 2 pm, 7 pm
  • Sunday, April 26 | 2 pm

Ticket Information:

  • $15 General Admission, $10 for Seniors and Students 
  • Free for BOW and MIT students
  • Pay What You Will on Thursday, April 23
image of a Tina D'Elia looking at the camera and wearing a blue sweatshirt with the words "New York" on it.

Tina D'Elia

*Canceled* Wellesley College Theatre Presents: Overlooked Latinas

Written and performed by Tina D'Elia
Apr 6, 7 PM
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

This award-winning one-woman show is a live telenovela celebrating queer culture, friendship and Latinx history.

Generously supported by:

the CLCE, The Spanish Department, the Office of Intercultural Education, and the Latinx Advisor's Office

students looking at photographs taped to a wall

The 2020 Senior and Thesis Art Exhibition

May 9–May 31
N/a
Free and open to the public

As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event will be moved online. Please check back for details.

Celebrate the work of graduating seniors at the 2019–20 Senior and Thesis Exhibition! Featuring thesis projects and artwork by advanced senior students in studio art, media arts and sciences, and cinema and media studies, among others, this exhibition showcases the range of skills and techniques mastered by Wellesley art students, including painting, photography, video, installation, and more.

For more information, please contact:

Samara Pearlstein, spearls2@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Art Department.

image of Christina Yu Yu smiling at the camera

Christina Yu Yu

It All Started with ARTH 100 *Canceled*

The 2019-20 Art History Club Alumnae Speaker: Christina Yu Yu ’02, Matsutaro Shoriki Chair, Art of Asia, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Mar 30, 5:30 PM
Jewett Arts Center 450
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

This talk, the fifth in an annual series, brings an alumna of the Art Department to campus to meet with art history club students and speak about her professional and personal trajectory after Wellesley. Please bring your questions! A reception will follow in the Jewett Sculpture Court.

Christina Yu Yu ’02 is the Matsutaro Shoriki Chair of the Art of Asia Department at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Prior to her position at the MFA, she served as director of the University of Southern California Pacific Asia Museum, where she revolutionized the museum’s image, programs, and exhibitions. She will speak about her professional journey in museum work and the role Wellesley has played in it, as well as discuss some of the new challenges facing museums today.

For more information, please contact:

Diane Schrenzel ’20, Art History Club president, dschrenz@wellesley.edu.

jamie gass

*Postponed* K-12 School Choice and The Liberal Arts: The Student Fellows Lecture

Apr 16, 4:30 PM
Founders 120
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been postponed.*

In the 2020 annual Freedom Project Student Fellows lecture, Jamie Gass, director of the Center for School Reform at the Boston-based think tank Pioneer Institute, will argue that school choice provides the best possibility for America’s K-12 schoolchildren to access the high-quality liberal arts curriculum found in excellent public, private, and parochial schools, as well as preparation for higher education. Gass will discuss a variety of school options, the legal and political barriers to greater choice, and the importance of time-tested academic content in primary and secondary education.

Jamie Gass is Pioneer Institute’s Director of the Center for School Reform. At Pioneer, he has framed, commissioned, and managed over 100 research papers and numerous policy events on K-12 education reform topics, including several with Pulitzer Prize-winning historians. Jamie has more than two decades of experience in public administration and education reform at the state, municipal, and school district levels. Previously, he worked at the Massachusetts Office of Educational Quality and Accountability as Senior Policy Analyst-Technical Writer and in the state budget office under two Massachusetts governors. In the 1990s, Jamie worked for the Dean of the Boston University School of Education/Boston University Management Team in its historic partnership with the Chelsea Public Schools. He has appeared on various Boston media outlets, as well as talk radio shows throughout the country. He has been quoted in Bloomberg/Businessweek, The Economist, Education Week, and The Boston Globe, and his op-eds are regularly published in New England newspapers, as well as in The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, The Hechinger Report, The Hill, The Daily Caller, The Federalist, Education Next, and City Journal. He’s won school reform awards in Massachusetts and Florida for his work on U.S. History/civic education, vocational-technical schools, and digital learning. Jamie speaks on academic standards, school choice options, and school accountability at events across the country.

Generously supported by:

The Freedom Project

portrait of Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum

Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum

The Betsy Wood Knapp ’64 Lecture *Postponed*

A Conversation About Race with Beverly Daniel Tatum
Apr 14, 4 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been postponed.*

How do we talk about race on campuses that have become increasingly diverse and that seek to promote equity and a sense of belonging? Join Beverly Daniel Tatum, author of Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race and president emerita of Spelman College, and Megan Núñez, dean of faculty affairs at Wellesley, for a candid conversation about racial relations in this country, and learn ways to facilitate necessary conversations about race and inclusion among young people.

For more information, please contact:

kssc@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Office of the President, the PLTC, the Knapp Social Science Center, the Department of Education, the HHMI-funded Inclusive Excellence grant and the ER&D Inclusive Excellence grant.

black and white illustration of abstract shapes and bodies

barbones (detail), Cesar Gabler, ink on paper.

Toro Herrera: An Exhibition by César Gabler

Mar 13–Apr 20
Jewett Art Gallery
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please note: As a precaution against the spread of COVID-19, the opening event has been canceled and the exhibition is open for Wellesley College campus community only.*

Chilean artist César Gabler exhibits new drawings in the Jewett Art Gallery at Wellesley College, including an installation drawn on-site over the course of a week. Gabler’s imagery makes references both allusive and explicit to social, political, and philosophical themes while referencing the visual languages of art history, illustration, and more.

Gallery hours: Mon–Fri, 10 am–4 pm; Sat–Sun, 12–4 pm.

For more information, please contact:

Samara Pearlstein, spearls2@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Art Department.

black and white archive photo of Wellesley students marching in a 1915 suffrage parade

Wellesley students marching in a 1915 suffrage parade

The Wellesley-Deerfield Symposium *Canceled*

From Suffrage to Stonewall: The Visual and Material Culture of Social Justice
Mar 14, 8:30 AM–5 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

*Please note: As a precaution against the spread of COVID-19, this event has been canceled.*

This symposium will examine the visual and material culture of social justice movements in the United States. Illustrated scholarly presentations will explore artistic expressions deployed to foster social, political, economic, and cultural change.

The years 2019 and 2020 mark significant anniversaries in the history of social justice movements in the United States, commemorating the many reform campaigns that have taken place from the 19th century to the present, including abolition/antislavery, women’s rights, and the civil rights movements for the African-American, LGBTQ, Native American, and disability communities. These campaigns sought political, social, economic, and cultural change, and they all deployed visual and material culture to advance their goals. The 2020 Wellesley-Deerfield Symposium will focus on research related to the wide range of artistic expression generated by social justice movements, from painting, sculpture, public performance, and installation to ephemera, costume, and craft.

Generously supported by:

the Barra Foundation.

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Archives

People with children in strollers in the Davis museum

Stroller Tours

Feb 12, Mar 11, Apr 8, May 13
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Spend an art-filled morning at the Davis strolling the galleries during this free guided tour—a special opportunity for families open before normal hours. Designed for art lovers and their little ones. Join us for a different theme on the second Wednesday of each month from 10:15-11 a.m.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

student wearing a Davis Museum t-shirt while standing in a gallery

Drop-in Public Tours

Feb 8–May 2, 2 PM
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Designed by Wellesley students representing a range of academic majors, these thematic tours of special exhibitions and permanent collections led by a student guide are free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. No tours on March 21 and March 28. For a full schedule of tours, please visit www.theDavis.org.

The Davis is committed to making our museum and programs accessible to all audiences. We encourage you to contact us about the following guided tour options, available for free with two weeks advance notice. To book your customized tour, please contact Arthurina Fears, Curator of Education and Programs, at afears@wellesley.edu or call 781.283.3045.

  • American Sign Language interpreted tours of the permanent collections and special exhibitions (subject to interpreter availability).
  • Tactile tours or verbal description tours of the permanent collections.
Generously supported by:

the Elizabeth Bein Keto ’48 Endowed Memorial Art Fund and Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.

Image of artwork in the Davis museum

Making Memories

Accessible Art Program for Adults Living with Alzheimer’s and Other Dementias
Feb 14, Mar 13, Apr 10, May 8
11 am in Davis Museum Lobby
Ticket information appears below

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Making Memories is an accessible arts program for adults living with early Alzheimer’s and other dementias and their care partners that provides a guided exploration of our permanent collections with specially trained museum staff and student guides. This free program offers opportunities to enjoy conversation, works of art, and new experiences at the Davis. Participation is free with advance registration. RSVPs required; in addition, private groups are encouraged to book a custom program.

Meet at 11 am in Davis Museum Lobby. For more information or to preregister, email Arthurina Fears, Curator of Education and Programs, at afears@wellesley.edu.

The Davis is committed to making our museum and programs accessible to all audiences. We encourage you to contact us about the following guided tour options, available for free with two weeks advance notice. To book your customized tour, please contact Arthurina Fears, Curator of Education and Programs, at afears@wellesley.edu or call 781.283.3045.

  • American Sign Language interpreted tours of the permanent collections and special exhibitions (subject to interpreter availability).
  • Tactile tours or verbal description tours of the permanent collections.

afears@wellesley.edu

Elizabeth Bein Keto ’48 Endowed Memorial Art Fund

Archival image of Dr. Harriett Alleyne Rice (Class of 1887), surrounded by purple geometric pattern and stylized shapes

Windows Invitational

Alexandria Smith: Seed to Harvest
Sep 1, 2019–Aug 31, 2020
Davis Museum Lobby Windows
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

The Windows Invitational engages artists in transforming the dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows that articulate the lobby and courtyard plaza of our signature Rafael Moneo building. The third commission in the series is by Alexandria Smith, head of painting at the Royal College of Art in London, formerly assistant professor of painting at Wellesley College.

Smith’s Seed to Harvest foregrounds portraits of Wellesley’s first African American graduates and borrows its title from the “Patternist” series of novels by Octavia Butler, stories that explore themes of science fiction, humanity, and the ethical and unethical uses of power. Rendering with hand-drawn and computer techniques, Smith embellishes original photographic portraits of five alumnae: Dr. Harriett Alleyne Rice (Class of 1887), Ethel M. Caution-Davis (Class of 1912), Katherine Naomi Robinson (Class of 1922), Clarissa Scott Delany (Class of 1923), and Jane Bolin (Class of 1928). She adds symbolic elements derived from her own visual vocabulary and from quilt patterns used to convey messages along the Underground Railroad (there were two stops in the town of Wellesley) to create the unique crests that adorn each with an honorific flourish.

Curated by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Wellesley’s Friends of Art at the Davis

abstract colorful painting by Elizabeth Mooney titled Cut Towards Center

Elizabeth Mooney, Cut Towards Center, 2019 (detail), Acrylic on wood panel, 48 x 48 inches.

Q20: Wellesley Faculty Artists

Feb 7–Jun 7
Camilla Chandler and Dorothy Buffum Chandler Gallery, Marjorie and Gerald Bronfman Gallery
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Q20 celebrates the inventive diversity of practices among professional faculty artists at Wellesley College. The 2020 edition of this quinquennial showcase at the Davis Museum features works across media, including photography, painting, collage, sculpture, book-arts, printmaking, installation, video, sound, and transmedial making.

The 10 artists included are: Jenny Olivia Johnson, Claudia Joskowicz, Phyllis McGibbon, Kelsey MillerElizabeth MooneyAndrew MowbrayDavid Teng OlsenDaniela Rivera, Katherine Ruffin, and William Van Beckum.

Q’20 is organized by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director of the Davis Museum, and Mark Beeman, manager of exhibitions and collections preparation, with major support from Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis and the Erna Bottigheimer Sands (class of 1929) Art Fund.

For more information, please contact:

781.283.2051

Image Credit:

Courtesy of the Elizabeth Mooney.

very old painting of a shirtless man (Saint Sebastian) pierced with arrows while people look on.

Unknown Venetian Artist, Holy Family with St. Catherine, St. Sebastian, and a Donor, 16th century, Oil on cradled panel, 49 3/8 in. x 65 3/4 in. (125.4 cm x 167 cm), Gift of Peter H. and Joan Macy Kaskell (Class of 1953) 2017.184.

Hidden Histories: Revealing the Life of a Painting

Sep 13, 2019–Jun 7, 2020
Robert and Claire Freedman Lober Viewing Alcove
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Hidden Histories: Revealing the Life of a Painting examines a 16th-century Venetian Sacra Conversazione, recently donated to the Davis Museum. This Holy Family with St. Catherine, St. Sebastian, and a donor was previously attributed to Giorgione, and exists in multiple versions, including one at the Musée du Louvre, Paris. Several important details in the Davis’s painting, such as the donor figure and the background landscape, differ from the other nearly identical works. Restorations, like the head of St. Joseph, are clearly visible on the canvas. The history of visual change evident in this painting spans centuries and now raises many questions: Who made it? How many artists or conservators worked on the painting? Why are there multiple copies, and why is this work different from the others? Hidden Histories explores this Sacra Conversazione painting through recent conservation, technical analysis, and an art historical lens to uncover a wealth of new information and highlight the unknown.

Co-curated by Alicia LaTores, Friends of Art Curatorial Research Assistant, and Katherine Davies ’19, the summer 2019 Eleanor P. DeLorme Museum Intern.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Peter H. Kaskell and Joan Macy Kaskell ’53.

sepia toned antique photos of a woman wearing a white dress and standing in various poses

André Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, Mme. Cusani, ca. 1860, Uncut albumen cartes-de-visite, 7 5/16 in. x 6 1/16 in.,

Making, Not Taking: Portrait Photography in the 19th Century

Feb 7–Jun 7
Joan Levine Freedman ’57 and Richard I. Freedman Gallery
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Mounted in conjunction with Going Viral: Photography, Performance, and the Everyday, this exhibition tells an earlier history of vernacular photography—that of 19th-century portraiture. Similar to snapshots, the portrait photograph is enigmatic for its ability to be a one-of-a-kind object (a family keepsake) and a duplicate (a repetition of conventional settings, poses, and framing devices) all at once. However, before photographs were taken or snapped, they were made. Early photography was a process that involved a great deal of time, labor, and costly materials. Thus, this exhibition explores the materiality, the craft, and the event of photography in its earliest iterations.

Curated by Carrie Cushman, Linda Wyatt Gruber ’66 Curatorial Fellow in Photography.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Linda Wyatt Gruber (class of 1966) and Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.

Image Credit:

Museum purchase with funds provided by Jacqueline Loewe Fowler (Class of 1947), 1997.47

sepia toned photograph of a person in the mountains, bending over with their rear end to the camera

Anonymous snapshot photograph, Gift of Peter J. Cohen, 2019.633

Going Viral: Photography, Performance, and the Everyday

Snapshots from the Peter J. Cohen Collection Gift
Feb 7–Jun 7
Morelle Lasky Levine '56 Works on Paper Gallery
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Today, we use the phrase “going viral” to describe the rapid reception and reproduction of media on the internet. However, since the dawn of amateur photography in the late 19th century, critics have warned of a “universal snapping psychosis.” Long before the age of the selfie, the craze for candid cameras spawned innumerable tropes that snapshooters found irresistible. This exhibition of early 20th-century American snapshots considers our everyday relationship to photography: the ways in which we mediate, understand, and narrate our lives through the snapping and sharing of photographs, and how and why certain types of images become socially infectious.

Mined from the Peter J. Cohen Collection gift of nearly 1,000 anonymous snapshots, the exhibition is organized into 11 sections that explore various performances, rituals, and gestures that have gone viral via photography. The texts for each section provide micro-histories of these diverse social phenomena and demonstrate how vernacular photographs might function as affective historical documents and offer rich rewards for the imaginative historian, anthropologist, or sociologist.

The exhibition will also showcase an original Kodak camera, early amateur photography manuals, Kodak 1s and 2s, 20th-century album pages, and six photo albums as well as the latest from Kodak—the Printomatic—with which visitors can shoot and print their own snapshots in the gallery.

We invite you to share your own snapshots and impressions with us on social media using #davisgoingviral.

Curated by Carrie Cushman, Linda Wyatt Gruber ’66 Curatorial Fellow in Photography.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Linda Wyatt Gruber (class of 1966) and Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.

Leah Price

*CANCELLED* What We Talk About When We Talk About Books

A Lecture by Leah Price (Rutgers University)
Apr 30, 4:30 PM, May 1, 12:30 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

What We Talk About When We Talk About Books
Thursday, April 30th, 4:30-6:00pm
Newhouse Center Lounge

Pundits warn that as our appetite for books dwindles, so too do the virtues in which printed, bound objects once trained us. But English professor Leah Price finds scant proof that a golden age of reading ever existed. From the dawn of mass literacy to the invention of the paperback, most readers already skimmed and multitasked. The evidence that books are dying proves even scarcer. In encounters with librarians, booksellers, and activists who are reinventing old ways of reading, Price offers fresh hope to bibliophiles and literature lovers alike. This lecture is free and open to the public. 

Book Learning: Media History as Negative Pedagogy
Friday, May 1st, 12:30-2:00pm

Newhouse Center

After opening remarks on what Leah Price calls "negative pedagogy" — classroom strategies that rely on forbidding students to write, read, keyboard, or even look at a book — this workshop will open up for discussion of methods for integrating book arts with media history. What can book history and bookmaking contribute to media literacy, to research skills, and to what's too often dismissed under the ugly name of "study skills"? How can introducing students to media artifacts from different times and places help them make sense of their own information management practices, inside the classroom and beyond? Which aspects of bibliographical description can provide the most useful tools to cultivate students' skepticism about the institutions (commercial and otherwise) from which they derive their knowledge of the world?

This workshop is open to Wellesley's faculty, staff, and advanced students. 

image of Hélène E. Bilis standing in a garden, looking at the camera, and smiling

*CANCELLED* Lessons on a Literary Rivalry

Lessons on a Literary Rivalry: Corneille and Racine, Dueling Playwrights, A Presentation by Newhouse Fellow Hélène Bilis
Apr 21, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Newhouse Fellow Hélène E. Bilis analyzes the literary and cultural phenomenon of doublons: dueling plays on the same subject, by different playwrights, presented on two Parisian stages on nearly the same dates.

In 1670, Pierre Corneille and Jean Racine squared off with Tite et Bérénice vs. Bérénice. France’s foremost playwrights battled for box office receipts, public esteem, artistic superiority, and overall bragging rights. In highlighting their dramatic duel, Bilis asks what can be learned about the creative process when it occurs in such an outwardly competitive context and explores how subsequent accounts of the doublon complicate traditional notions of authorship, biography, influence, and literary prestige.

Hélène E. Bilis is an associate professor of French at Wellesley College. She is a 2019-2020 faculty fellow at the Newhouse Center for the Humanities. 

black and white image of two people looking at a video camera on a film shoo in the desert

*CANCELLED* Cinematic Offerings from AdeRisa Productions

The Importance of Representation: Cinematic Offerings from AdeRisa Productions
Apr 15, 4:30–6:30 PM, Apr 16, 12:45 PM
Collins Cinema (screenings) and the Newhouse Center for the Humanities (workshop)
Free and open to the public

Film screenings and discussions of the importance of representation in film and the opportunities independent films offer marginalized communities as they seek to tell their own stories.

This two-day event includes screenings of various short films from AdeRisa Productions, under the direction of Adelina Anthony and Marisa Becerra. Their company focuses on producing Two Spirit, LGBTQ+POC films with an emphasis on Xicana/o/x, Chicanx, Mexican, and Latinx stories. The first event includes a discussion with Anthony and Becerra and a screening of six award-winning short films: The Good Kind (2014), Gold Star (2016), Amigas with Benefits (2017), Guarding Santos (2019), Ode to Pablo (2019), and La Serenata (2019). The second event is a workshop designed for students interested in creating and funding independent films.

Generously supported by:

Women's and Gender Studies, LGBTQ Office, Latinx Advisor Office, Cinema and Media Studie, Education, American Studies, Latin American Studies, Spanish, Media Arts and Sciences, English and Creative Writing, Latinx Studies Minor

 Four Students in a Dorm Room in College Hall

Four students in a dorm room in College Hall (1881)

*CANCELLED* Hispanism Colloquium 2020

Transatlantic Hispanism, Feminism and Education: The Pioneers
Apr 14, 2–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

The Hispanism Colloquium 2020 will focus on literary and academic exchanges between Spain and the United States during the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century by exploring the innovative projects and intellectual dialogue that created and fostered cross-cultural understanding. 

  • Inspired by women's colleges of the Northeast United States, a group of pioneers, including Wellesley's professor of English, Katharine Lee Bates 1880, worked to establish the "International Institute for Girls in Spain" in order to bring a quality education to a long-underserved population. 
  • Harvard University's George Ticknor—an influential scholar, book collector and literary historian—established the first canon for the study of Spanish literature in the United States. Meanwhile, his wife, Anna Eliot Ticknor, and daughter, Anna E. Ticknor, contributed in unique ways to the growing international dialogue. 
  • Among the distinguished writers and academics who came to the United States to live and teach in the wake of the Spanish Civil War, Wellesley's Pedro Salinas and Jorge Guillén produced autobiographical writings that evolved significantly the longer they remained in their adopted home. 

Panelists include Anna Caballé (Universitat de Barcelona), José Manuel del Pino (Dartmouth College), Carlos Ramos (Wellesley College) and Margery Resnick (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). 

Generously supported by:

Department of Spanish, Women's and Gender Studies Department, and Education Department; and with the collaboration of The Leslie Center for the Humanities at Dartmouth College.

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Archives, Library and Technology Services

Composite image of Martín Espada and Yara Liceaga-Rojas

Martín Espada and Yara Liceaga-Rojas

*CANCELLED* Conversation and Bilingual Poetry Reading

Featuring Martín Espada and Yara Liceaga-Rojas
Apr 9, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

About Martín Espada
Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His latest collection of poems from Norton is called Vivas to Those Who Have Failed (2016). Other books of poems include The Trouble Ball (2011), The Republic of Poetry (2006), Alabanza (2003), A Mayan Astronomer in Hell’s Kitchen (2000), Imagine the Angels of Bread (1996), City of Coughing and Dead Radiators (1993) and Rebellion is the Circle of a Lover’s Hands (1990). He is the editor of What Saves Us: Poems of Empathy and Outrage in the Age of Trump (2019). His many honors include the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Creeley Award, the National Hispanic Cultural Center Literary Award, an American Book Award, an Academy of American Poets Fellowship, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. The Republic of Poetry was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His book of essays and poems, Zapata’s Disciple (1998), was banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona, and reissued by Northwestern University Press. A former tenant lawyer in Greater Boston’s Latinx community, Espada is a professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

About Yara Liceaga-Rojas
I am a queer Afro-Caribbean Puerto Rican mother, poet/writer, performer, cultural worker, and educator. My projects revolve around the visibility of marginalized subjects. I write and publish, perform at festivals, and coordinate projects that address origin, gender, race, and class. Coming from a United States colony, Puerto Rico, my main concern is to be visible since we as colonial subjects are made invisible. Self-determination has been stripped away from us. 

In projects, I gather multi-disciplinary artists - musicians, writers, performers, visual and audiovisual artists - and I include cisgender, trans, and non-binary folks, and/or BIPoC of various origins who are not usually given the space to perform their art. For example, my projects Acentos espesos/Thick Accents and Poetry Is Busy: Visible Caribe Series, portray the complexities of life for migrants who live in the United States. Making what's hidden visible is always a creative fuel for me. 

In 2019, I became a Brother Thomas Fellow and published Hacernos el adiós with the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture; I have five poetry books published in previous years. I've secured funding for my projects from Cambridge Arts, Kindle Project LLC, New England Foundation for the Arts' Creative City, The Boston Foundation's Live Arts Boston and the Boston Center for the Arts. El despojo: ¿Alguien ha/Has Anyone?, my latest project, deals with the experience of Hurricane María in the Puerto Rican Diaspora as a way of healing environmental disaster trauma.

Generously supported by:

the LatinX Advisor Office and MassPoetry

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black and white drawing of a nude figure next to a fire, illustrating the nervous system reflex to heat

*CANCELLED*Brainstorming: An Interdisciplinary Panel Featuring Wellesley Faculty

Apr 7, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Have you ever wondered what a mind actually is? Or whether it is distinct from a brain? Or about how a mind communicates with a body? Or whether we could—or should—artificially create a mind?

This event is a cross-disciplinary conversation about historical and contemporary attempts to answer these questions. Panelists from four disciplines will give short presentations touching on the questions as they relate to their areas of expertise. A discussion, with the aim of making chronological and conceptual connections from the early modern period to today, will follow.

Panelists: Julie Walsh (philosophy); Rebecca Summerhays (writing program); Catherine Wearing (philosophy); Eni Mustafaraj and Peter Mawhorter (computer science); and Mike Wiest (neuroscience). Moderator: Eve Zimmerman, director of the Newhouse Center.

image of Saidiya Hartman looking at the camera and smiling

Saidiya Hartman

*CANCELLED* The Jordan Lecture: Saidiya Hartman

Apr 1, 4:30–6 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

Saidiya Hartman is a scholar of African American literature and cultural history whose works explore the afterlife of slavery in modern American society and bear witness to lives, traumas, and fleeting moments of beauty that historical archives have omitted or obscured. She weaves findings from her meticulous historical research into narratives that retrieve from oblivion stories of nameless and sparsely documented historical actors, such as female captives on slave ships and the inhabitants of slums at the turn of the twentieth century.

Hartman’s most recent book, Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments (2019), is similarly inventive in its mode of presentation and immerses readers in the interior lives of young black women who fled the South and moved to Northern cities in the early twentieth century. While drawing from sociological surveys, tenement photographs, reformatory case files, and other sources, she critiques the pathologizing portrayals these official documents present and recovers stories of resistance enacted by famous women (such as Ida B. Wells) and numerous anonymous others who looked outside the bounds of the law to find kinship, intimacy, and freedom. By addressing gaps and omissions in accounts of trans-Atlantic slavery and its aftermath, Hartman has influenced an entire generation of scholars and afforded readers a proximity to the past that would otherwise be foreclosed.

black and white image of the Crown Prince Hirohito visiting David Lloyd George at Chequers

Crown Prince Hirohito visiting David Lloyd George at Chequers, 1921.

*CANCELLED* Japanese Anglophiles and the Allure of Colonization

A Presentation by Newhouse Fellow Hiromu Nagahara
Mar 30, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

In the era of Western imperialism, Japan not only maintained its independence but, infamously, forged an empire of its own in East Asia. During the same period, however, Japan’s political elites—including diplomats, aristocrats, and even a crown prince—flocked to European cities, ostensibly to study the secrets of Western might. In this presentation, Newhouse Fellow Hiromu Nagahara highlights the experiences of Japanese visitors to London, many of whom clearly saw the British Empire as a model to emulate in Japan’s quest to join the ranks of “Great Powers.”

Hiromu Nagahara is an associate professor of history at MIT. He is in residence at the Newhouse Center as a 2019-2020 faculty fellow. 

Sarah Townsend in front of brick wall

Sarah Townsend

*CANCELLED* The Legacy of Whiteness in Multiracial Ireland and Irish America

A Presentation by Newhouse Fellow Sarah Townsend
Mar 17, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Over the past quarter century, Ireland has transformed from a mostly homogeneous culture to the home of immigrants and refugees from around the world. Yet the legacies of white supremacy linger despite the seemingly tolerant welcome extended toward the country’s “New Irish” arrivals. Drawing upon research in historical and literary archives, Newhouse Fellow Sarah Townsend uncovers the secret history of Irish-American assimilation that haunts race relations in present-day Ireland. By tracing the racial transformation of neighborhoods from postwar Detroit to contemporary Dublin, she examines how Irish racial formation is intimately tied to the project of white upward mobility.

Sarah Townsend is an assistant professor of English at the University of New Mexico. She is a 2019-2020 Newhouse Center faculty fellow. 

illustration of the U.S. map filled with stylized stick figures of people

Who Counts? A Faculty Panel on Census Data *Canceled*

Mar 19, 1–2 PM
Knapp Atrium in Pendleton East
Free and open to the public

*Due to precautions against the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19), this event has been canceled*

Does the census truly count everyone? This spring the Census Bureau will conduct the decennial census. Mandated by the Constitution, the 2020 census marks the first time that respondents may answer the survey online. The census provides a wealth of demographic data for researchers, politicians, and businesses, and it is an important avenue for civic engagement in the United States. Like all surveys, the census should be carefully analyzed. For example, certain demographic groups are historically difficult to count, and the phrasing of questions has changed over time. Join an interdisciplinary conversation with Wellesley faculty panelists about how to critically engage with census data.

Panelists: Maneesh Arora, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science; Brenna Greer, Associate Professor, Department of History; and Cassandra Pattanayak, Jack and Sandra Polk Guthman '65 Director of the Quantitative Analysis Institute, Departments of Math and QR.

This event is co-sponsored by Clapp Library, the History Department, and the Quantitative Analysis Institute.

image of Gish Jen looking at the camera

Gish Jen

*CANCELED* Reading and Conversation with Gish Jen

Mar 12, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Due to precautions against the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19), this event has been canceled.*

Gish Jen’s new novel, The Resisters (February 2020), invites the reader into a not-so-distant dystopian future. In AutoAmerica, water covers half the land and the internet has become the face of a surveillance state.

Jen’s previous works include The Girl at the Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap (2017), Tiger Writing: Art, Culture, and the Interdependent Self (2013), Love Wife (2004), and Mona in the Promised Land (1996). Her short stories have appeared in the New Yorker, the Atlantic Monthly, and dozens of other periodicals and anthologies. Jen is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; the recipient of honorary doctorates from Williams College and Emerson College; and a recipient of Lannan, Fulbright, Radcliffe, Guggenheim, and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships.

Image Credit:

Basso Cannarsa

image of three people sitting on the floor in a Davis Museum gallery and looking at an abstract painting

*Canceled* Educator Workshop

Mar 12, 3:30–5 PM
Davis Lobby & Galleries
Ticket information appears below

*Due to precautions against the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19), this event has been canceled.*

The Davis welcomes local K-12 educators for a workshop focused on utilizing resources from our permanent collections and special exhibitions. Explore how to connect the themes and works of art on view with your classroom curricula.

Participation is free. Advance registration is required. Please e-mail Arthurina Fears, curator of education and programs, at afears@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Palley Endowment Fund for Davis Museum Outreach Programs.

black and white image of three people's shadows on the ground

Anonymous snapshot photograph, Gift of Peter J. Cohen, 2019.73

*Canceled* Curatorial Gallery Talk: Carrie Cushman: Going Viral

Mar 17, 4 PM
Morelle Lasky Levine ’56 Works on Paper Gallery
Free and open to the public

*In an abundance of caution due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, this event is has been canceled.*

Join Carrie Cushman, Linda Wyatt Gruber ’66 Curatorial Fellow in Photography, for a discussion of Going Viral: Photography, Performance, and the Everyday, a special exhibition of 20th-century snapshot photographs from the Peter J. Cohen Collection gift.

group of people looking at artwork in the davis museum

*Canceled* Women’s History Month Tour

Drop-in Public Tour
Mar 14, 2 PM
Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

*In an abundance of caution due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, this event is has been canceled.*

Join a student guide for a drop-in tour celebrating Women’s History Month. Free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. For a full schedule of tours, please visit www.theDavis.org.

Generously supported by:

the Elizabeth Bein Keto ’48 Endowed Memorial Art Fund.

image of a glass bottle containing dry tea. the bottle has a label that reads "Tea thrown into Boston Harbor Dec. 16, 1776"

Container of tea from the Boston Tea Party

*Canceled* Annual Friends of the Library Lecture by Nancy Siegel

Mar 12, 5 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

*In an abundance of caution due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, this event is has been canceled.*

Join us for a lecture by Nancy Siegel, professor of art history and culinary history at Towson University. This is the second annual lecture sponsored by the Friends of the Library.

From the late 18th through the early decades of the 19th century, recipes linking food to politics—with names such as Election Cake, Independence Cake, Democratic Tea Cakes, and Liberty Tea—became increasingly popular as a means to communicate caution or approval regarding the state of affairs in the United States. Women, in particular, became culinary activists who authored cookbooks in praise of the new and fragile nation; they provided a platform for promoting democratic ideals and engraining them in the public consciousness more powerfully than presidential addresses or ratified documents ever could.

Join us after the talk for a reception featuring Election Cake and Liberty Tea!

For more information, please contact:

Jacki Musacchio, jmusacch@wellesley.edu.

Image Credit:

American Antiquarian Society

Galen Stone Tower

*CANCELED* The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs: Community Open Tower

Mar 12, 12:30–2:15 PM
Galen Stone Tower
Free and open to the public

*In an abundance of caution, this event has been canceled due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.*

Faculty and staff are welcome to visit the highest office on campus in Galen Stone Tower.

The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the tradition of bell ringing, which has continued since the carillon was first installed in 1931.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Fred Aldrich

Fred Aldrich

*CANCELED* Midday Muse: Romantic Horns, Fred Aldrich and Friends

Works by Composers Constantin Homilius, Franz Strauss, Georges Bizet, and Nikolai Tcherepnin
Mar 19, 1 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

*In an abundance of caution, this event has been canceled due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.*

Romantic Horns presents works by composers Constantin Homilius, Franz Strauss, Georges Bizet and Nikolai Tcherepnin, and be performed by horn players Fred Aldrich, Robert Marlatt, Lauren Winter and Kevin Owen.

Aldrich is a Wellesley College performance faculty, as well as principal horn of the Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra and a member of the Boston Classical Orchestra. He has extensive performance experience with the Boston Symphony, Boston Pops, Boston Ballet, and Boston Lyric Opera and has also performed with the Philharmonia Hungarica.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Marjorie Copland Baum Fund.

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Portrait image of Liz Miranda (left) and Lindsay Sabadosa

Liz Miranda ’02 and Lindsay Sabadosa ’02

*POSTPONED* When Women Win

Mar 12, 12:45–2 PM
Knapp Atrium, Pendleton East
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

IN AN ABUNDANCE OF CAUTION, THIS EVENT IS POSTPONED. DETAILS ABOUT A FUTURE DATE WILL BE SHARED SOON.

The Knapp Social Sciences Center is honored to host Massachusetts State Representatives Liz Miranda ’02 and Lindsay Sabadosa ’02 for a conversation moderated by Stacie Goddard, professor of political science.

Miranda and Sabadosa, who were two of the record-breaking wave of women who ran for public office during the 2018 midterms, will share the stories of their paths to public office.

All members of the Wellesley College campus community are invited to attend, and pizza lunch will be provided. 

This event is part of #WellesleyVotes, a nonpartisan initiative that aims to bring together the Wellesley community to explore our shared commitment to democracy and democratic values. Throughout 2020, #WellesleyVotes will host activities and events focused around a diversity of ideas, issues, and people designed to help students develop skills for lifelong, active citizenship. 

Nazan Bedirhanoglu

*POSTPONED* Diasporic Tradition as Curatorial Practice

The Making of Kurdish Identity in the United States: A Presentation by Newhouse Fellow Nazan Bedirhanoglu
Mar 11, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

This event has been postponed. We will reschedule as soon as possible.

In this talk, Nazan Bedirhanoglu reflects on the use of symbols and narratives as building blocks of the Kurdish diasporic identity and share insights about her field research on the Kurdish diaspora in the United States.

Kurds are denied their basic human rights in their home region, divided by Turkey, Iraq, Iran, and Syria, and struggle against the assimilation by their governments. Many Kurds see these governments as colonial powers, and they construct their identity with symbols and narratives defying inner-colonial rhetoric. Bedirhanoglu explores the production and representation of diasporic traditions through the use of these symbols and narratives in the making and recasting of a Kurdish identity away from home.

Nazan Bedirhanoglu is a Freedom Project Post-Doctoral fellow in the Political Science Department at Wellesley College. She is a 2019 Newhouse Center summer faculty fellow.

a man playing a trombone

CONCERT CANCELLED - DESCARGA: Jazz and World Music Faculty Latin Jam!

The Concert is Cancelled.
Mar 7, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

This Concert will be rescheduled.

Join Wellesley College’s Jazz and World Music Faculty for a concert tribute to “Descarga”: the essence of musical collaboration among friends! Faculty “Conjuntos” from solo, to duo, trio, and up to the full ensemble, perform classic Cuban and Salsa rhythms, as well as originals inspired by the great traditions of Son Montuno, Bolero, and more. Wellesley Jazz and World Music faculty includes: Kris Adams, Tom Duprey, Rich Greenblatt, Mark Hamilton, Mark Henry, Russell Hoffmann, Steven Kirby, Steve Langone, Lance Martin, Cercie Miller, Paula Zeitlin, and Kera Washington. With special guest: K.E. Goldschmitt.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Marjorie Copland Baum Fund.

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

collage of artworks by Myra Greene, Will Wilson, Edie Bresler, and Takashi Arai

(top to bottom, left to right): Takashi Arai, Multiple Monument for B29: Enola Gay, 2017, Daguerreotype, 200 x 77cm; Edie Bresler, 5 participants (2 days, 3 places), 2019, Four unique cyanotypes on archival vellum, 18 x 48 in; Will Wilson, Madrienne Salgado, Jingle Dress Dancer/Government and Public Relations Manager for the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, Citizen of the Muckleshoot Nation, 2017, Talking Tintype, from the series Critical Indigenous Photographic Exchange: Seattle Art Museum; Myra Greene, Untitled (Ref. #70) from Character Recognition, 2006-2007, Black glass ambrotype.

**Postponed** Handmade Photography Today Symposium

Mar 7, 11 AM–5 PM
Collins Cinema, Davis Lobby, Davis Plaza, and Galleries
Free and open to the public

**Event post-poned**With an abundance of caution, the Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31st. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates, 781.283.2051.**

In conjunction with the exhibition Making, Not Taking: Portrait Photography in the 19th Century, the Davis Museum presents a day-long symposium that will explore contemporary iterations of 19th-century photographic processes.

From photograms to platinum prints, alternative approaches to automatic point-and-shoot and digital photography have spiked among professional and amateur photographers around the globe in recent years. The boom in what Lyle Rexer has termed “the antiquarian avant-garde” is in part a reaction to the supposedly desensitized nature of digital photography, but it should also be understood in the context of a more widespread turn to the materials, process, and event of photography as a site of knowledge production. We will hear from four acclaimed photographers working in 19th-century processes: Myra Greene (ambrotypes), Will Wilson (tintypes), Edie Bresler (cyanotypes), and Takashi Arai (daguerreotypes). The speakers will discuss how the specific material conditions of early photographic formats have the potential to inform and produce alternative understandings of our contemporary relationship to historical imagery.

Free and open to the public. Advance registration and RSVP are requested.

Co-hosted with the Photographic Resource Center.

Generously supported by:

the Bern Schwartz Family Foundation

Image Credit:

Courtesy of the artists.

Chindon Tsūshinsha

Chindon Tsūshinsha

*CANCELLED* Resonances of Chindon-ya

A Musical Demonstration and Lecture Featuring Chindon Tsūshinsha and Marié Abe
Mar 19, 12:45–2 PM
Academic Quad, Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

This event is cancelled. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Chindon-ya is a uniquely Japanese street musical advertisement practice from the late 1800s, which has recently gained renewed relevance as both a nostalgic form of publicity and also a political tool for street protests.

This event is a very rare opportunity to see a chindon-ya troupe in action outside of Japan, featuring Chindon Tsūshinsha, Japan's most renowned chindon-ya troupe from Osaka. Ethnomusicologist Marié Abe (Boston University), the author of Resonances of Chindon-ya: Sounding Space and Sociality in Contemporary Japan (Wesleyan University Press, 2018), will show how this seemingly innocuous and allegedly obsolete form of musical labor has gained traction as an aesthetic, economic, and political practice in the times of neoliberal precarity and nuclear anxiety in contemporary Japan.

The lecture will be accompanied by live performances by the members of Chindon Tsūshinsha, who will demonstrate their performance tactics to show how they entice and allure the passersby with their musical sounds and gestures.

The event will be followed by a Q&A with the members of Chindon Tsūshinsha, and conclude with a short performance by the troupe. Lunch will provided.

Generously supported by:

the Japan Foundation

image of Ken Botnick looking at the camera, standing in front of an outdoor fountain

The Cornille Lecture: The Book as Lens: Making Books as a Mode of Inquiry

A Presentation by Ken Botnick
Feb 27, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Cornille Professor Ken Botnick explores the material authorship of the artist book, achieved through the combination of concept, design, material, and production.

The artist book is to the world of books as poetry is to the world of writing: Its grammar and syntax are a unique expression of the voice of the maker. The artist book combines visual, textual, material, and production qualities in a product of the mind and the hand. This talk will consider the artist book as a sequential framing device in which the author poses questions and conducts investigations carried out on the landscape of the page.

image of a map of the east cost U.S. with a piece of paper on it that says "Census 2020"

Unlock the Census

Mar 11, 1–2 PM
Clapp 131
Free and open to the public

In this event, participants will learn how to access census data for their research. The census provides a wealth of demographic data for researchers, politicians, and businesses, and it is an important avenue for civic engagement in the United States. This workshop, coinciding with the 2020 Census this spring, will introduce participants to the basic principles of working with census data. Both historical and current census data will be covered, as well as mapping census data and data management best practices.

Instructors: Daria Hafner, Research & Instruction Librarian; Dani Henry, GIS & Data Instructional Technologist.

This event is co-sponsored by Clapp Library and the History Department.

a sepia toned photograph of Joseph Laroche

Joseph Laroche

Losing Laroche: The Story of the Only Black Passenger on the Titanic

A Presentation by Newhouse Fellow Kellie Carter Jackson
Feb 11, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

The story of the Haitian Joseph Laroche, his French wife, and their descendants is largely unknown and demonstrates how we have imagined Atlantic travel on the Titanic as a set of white privileges. The Titanic’s construction, crew, and passengers have been the subject of much research; here Carter Jackson examines the unexplored aspect of race. She explains the ways Laroche allows us to better understand the possibilities and limitations of black travel in the Titanic moment. His travel poignantly demonstrates how anti-blackness stifles the economic and social mobility of black people while paradoxically ensuring that they remain in a constant state of movement, searching for belonging.

Kellie Carter Jackson is the Knafel Assistant Professor of the Humanities in the Department of Africana Studies at Wellesley College. She is also a 2019-2020 faculty fellow at the Newhouse Center for the Humanities. 

Hauwa Ibrahim

Hauwa Ibrahim

International Women’s Day Panel and Reception with Hauwa Ibrahim

Mar 5, 5:30–7:30 PM
Alumnae Hall Ballroom
Free and open to the public

A panel discussion and dinner reception in celebration of International Women’s Day at Wellesley College. Guest speaker Hauwa Ibrahim and a panel of current Wellesley students will share their lived experiences as international women and speak upon the themes of empowerment, inclusivity and community, and how to make a difference in this globally-connected world.

Hauwa Ibrahim is an international human rights and Sharia law attorney with over 20 years of experience representing women and children condemned to death in Sharia courts. In 2005, she received the European Parliament Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought. Ibrahim has been a visiting professor at Harvard University Divinity School, a world fellow at Yale University, a Radcliffe fellow, and a fellow at both the Human Rights Program and the Islamic Legal Studies Program at Harvard University, and senior fellow at the Majlis El-Hassan in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. She is a visiting professor at the University of Rome, Italy, president of the Peace Institute, and author of the bestselling book Practicing Shariah Law: Seven Strategies for Achieving Justice in Shariah Courts. In 2018, she joined the Wellesley Centers for Women as a visiting scholar. Her multidisciplinary, collaborative work investigates the root causes of terrorism, the radicalization of youth, and builds bridges of cooperation between religious and non-religious communities.

Dinner will be served. Please RSVP.

Co-sponsored by the Slater International Center, the Albright Institute, and the Wellesley Centers for Women.

white text against blue background that says "What are your aspirations for Wellesley's future?"

Strategic Planning Community Sessions

Feb 25, 12:45 PM, Feb 26, 9 AM, Mar 2, 10:30 AM
Tishman Commons and Alumnae Ballroom
Free and open to the public

How can we create a greater sense of belonging and connection at Wellesley? How does Wellesley provide an education that makes a difference in the world? How can we elebvate Wellesley’s role in the U.S. and globally? How should our organization and governance change to achieve the “Wellesley of the future”?

Come to a strategic planning community session and share your thoughts. All members of the College community are welcome!

Learn more about strategic planning at wellesley.edu/stategicplanning.

Dates:

  • Tuesday, February 2, 3-4:30 p.m. | Tishman Commons
  • Wednesday, February 26, 9-10:30 a.m. | Tishman Commons
  • Monday, March 2, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | Alumnae Ballroom
Danez Smith

Danez Smith

Black History Month Coffeehouse & Open Mic: Danez Smith

With Tufts University’s S-Factor
Feb 28, 7 PM
Harambee House
Free and open to the public

2020 Black History Month Coffeehouse & Open Mic, featuring poet and performer Danez Smith, with Tufts University’s S-Factor.

Generously supported by:

Harambee House, the Committee on Lectures and Cultural Events, the English and Creative Writing Department

image of a woman wearing a red shirt standing in front of an academic building

*POSTPONED* Civic Signs: Disability and Citizenship in the Early United States

A Presentation by Newhouse Fellow Sari Altschuler
Feb 24, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

This event has been postponed. We will announce a new date as soon as possible.

The American Revolution ushered in an unprecedented optimism about the abilities of individuals—at least white men—to participate in civic life. Using Enlightenment-inspired rhetoric, Americans in the new nation espoused the belief that almost all such individuals could be made good citizens, and in the first decades of independence they created institutions for people with particular impairments to do this work. This had unanticipated reciprocal effects: As the institutions began to define what it meant to be Deaf, blind, or mad in America, they also gave individuals with particular disabilities a stronger sense of shared identity, community, and common experience that, in turn, shaped the very ideas of citizenship and belonging. In this talk, Newhouse Fellow Sari Altschuler will look at the particular case of the Deaf community and its role in determining what it meant to have a voice before the law.

Sari Altschuler is associate professor of English, associate director of the Humanities Center, and founding director of the Health, Humanities, and Society minor at Northeastern University. She is a 2019-2020 Newhouse Center faculty fellow.

the words "the rise of surveillance capitalism" written in graphic letters inside a graphic outline of an eye

Shoshana Zuboff: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism

The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power
Feb 25, 7:30–10 PM
Alumnae Hall
Ticket information appears below

Shoshana Zuboff, professor emerita at Harvard Business School, discusses her latest book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power. In this critically acclaimed work, Zuboff shows how our economy, politics, and society are increasingly being shaped by digital technologies. In her view, surveillance capitalism—a concept she coined—defines the current age in which we’ve all opted into the commodification of our personal information. Throughout the book, she outlines the cost of putting a price on private data, and she urges all of us to pay attention, resist habituation, and come up with novel responses to a new era.

Tickets are required, please reserve tickets in advance. Doors open at 7:10 p.m.

Following the reading and Q&A from 7:30-9 PM, there will be a book signing and reception from 9-10 PM. A limited number of books will be available for purchase with cash or check.

This event is part of the programming of the Babson-Olin-Wellesley faculty-led initiative Intellectual Community Building Through Reading, Discussion, and Public Guest Lectures.

Parking and directions:

  • Free parking is available in the Wellesley College garage, the first right at the main entrance on Route 135.
  • Alumnae Hall is located directly opposite the parking garage and is accessible to all.
For more information, please contact:

jbeswick@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the BOW Presidential Grant in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Data Science and their societal impacts.

Image Credit:

The Intercept

stock image of woman holding thumbs up and thumbs down

The Cypher: Electoral Politics: Young, Black, and Undecided

Feb 20, 6:30 PM
Harambee House
Free and open to the public

This discussion will focus on the role of young Black voters in the upcoming 2020 presidential election. Its intent is not to push a specific political agenda, but to present information to inform potential voters. Dinner will be provided.

This event is part of Wellesley’s 2020 celebration of Black History Month. For the full slate of events, please visit the Black History Month calendar.

Guest panelists include:

  • Bianca Jordan, Esq., immigration lawyer
  • Henoss Taddesse, consultant

Student panelists include:

  • Laissa Alexis ’20
  • Zoe Wiles ’20
  • Anah Lewi ’20

The discussion will be moderated by Laurie Brutus ’20, WCD President.

A voter registration drive will also be held at this event, which is facilitated by the Wellesley Committee for Political and Legislative Awareness (CPLA).

oil painting of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

The Music of Tchaikovsky

An Exploration of the Works and Compositional Style of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Feb 24, 8 PM
Pendleton Grand Music Salon (Pendleton West 201)
Free and open to the public

This presentation by Alexander Vavilov, founding member of the Sheffield Chamber Players, focuses on the significance of Tchaikovsky’s style of composition and its unique traits, following its development through his life. The sense of “Russianness” in his music for the most part comes from its emotional content. Tchaikovsky’s genius lies in his uncanny ability to penetrate deep into the soul of his people, transform those insights through the prism of his own experience and express it by musical means. As a result, his compositions astound as both detailed and large-scale studies of human emotion and psychology, truthful and at times extreme in their depiction. In his own words, it’s a “musical confession of the soul, which unburdens itself through sounds just as a lyric poet expresses himself through poetry.”

The presentation will focus on tracing these traits of Tchaikovsky’s music through several of his prominent works in different genres. Using audio-visual materials, we will dive into his writing and explore how he applied his compositional principles in practice. We will also observe the dramatic change that his style undergoes through the years. Audience questions are welcome both during and at the end of the presentation.

 

For more information, please contact:

ksangoja@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Maria Opasnov Tyler ’52 Fund.

Image Credit:

Portrait by Nikolai Kuznetsov, 1893.

Aliya Khalidi ’07

Aliya Khalidi ’07

Town Hall Meeting: Know Your Rights: A Workshop with Attorney Aliya Khalidi ’07

Apr 6, 2017, 4:30 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

This workshop with attorney Aliya Khalidi ’07 is designed to help Wellesley community members understand their rights under the new executive orders.

Generously supported by:

the Office of the President, the Working Group on Immigration Policy, and the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life.

wellesley college students

Wellesley in MetroWest: Building Connections Between Campus and Community

Apr 18, 2017, 4:15 PM
Alumnae Hall Ballroom
Free and open to the public

The Project for Public Leadership and Action (PPLA) invites Wellesley students, faculty, and staff to meet community organizers and advocates from Framingham, Mass., to discuss current community initiatives and potential Wellesley partnerships. Speakers represent organizations such as MetroWest Worker Center/Casa de Trabajadores, MetroWest Health Foundation, Out MetroWest, and Framingham Public Schools.

Generously supported by:

the Office of the President, the Working Group on Immigration Policy and the Project for Public Leadership and Action.

black and white drawing of a fist held up

Cross Movement Solidarity

A Workshop with Shannon Al-Wakeel of the Muslim Justice League
Apr 25, 2017, 4:30 PM
Harambee House
Free and open to the public

Wellesley College community members are invited to participate in this workshop to learn about concrete ways to support and build solidarity with and among diverse communities affected by both the new executive orders and the ongoing “countering violent extremism” (CVE) programs in Greater Boston.

Generously supported by:

the Office of the President, the Working Group on Immigration Policy, and the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life.

protest signs in support of immigrants and refugees

A Day Without Immigrants

May 1, 2017
Severence Green
Free and open to the public

Wellesley students have planned a campus action in support of immigrants’ rights and the nationwide strike, “A Day Without Immigrants” on May 1, 2017. Poster-making begins on Severance Green at 10 am followed by an 11 am march to Morton Park in Wellesley and community rally at 11:30 am. The Working Group on Immigration Policy supports the student-led action and encourages the community to participate.

Roberto Gonzales

Roberto Gonzales

Lives Still in Limbo: DACAmented and Navigating Uncertain Futures

A Lecture by Roberto Gonzales, Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Nov 1, 2017, 12:30 PM
Pendleton East 239
Free and open to the public

Having conducted one of the most comprehensive studies of undocumented immigrants in the U.S., Roberto Gonzales, Professor of Education at Harvard Graduate School of Education, will discuss his book Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America. He will also explore lessons learned from the National UnDACAmented Research Project, reflecting surveys of nearly 2,700 undocumented adults and in-depth interviews with 500 individuals in President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Lunch will be provuded by the President's Office.

A recording of the presentation is available on YouTube.

Lorgia Garcí­a Peña

Lorgia Garcí­a Peña

Teaching in/from Freedom

Supporting Undocumented Students and Their Families in the Classroom and Beyond
Nov 30, 2017, 4:30 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

Lorgia Garcí­a Peña, Associate Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of History and Literature at Harvard University, is a Latino/a Studies scholar who specializes in ethnic, race, and national belonging. Co-founder of Freedom University Georgia, a tuition-free institution for undocumented students banned from public higher education in Georgia, she will discuss the ways educational institutions can successfully support undocumented students.

supreme court

Free Law Clinic with MetroWest Legal Services

Feb 1, 2018, 4:30 PM
Clapp Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

All members of the Wellesley community—students, faculty, and staff—are invited and welcomed to sign-up for one of eighteen 20-minute private consultations on immigration law with an expert lawyer from MetroWest Legal Services. Sign-up is a two-step process and may be done anonymously. Limited drop-in consultations will also be available.

Please contact Carolyn Slaboden (faculty and staff) or Karen Pabon of Slater International Center (students) if you have any questions.

letters that spell out "Know your rights"

“Know Your Rights” Presentation

Feb 1, 2018, 4 PM
Clapp Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

A presentation and Q&A session for Wellesley community members to get the facts about their rights and have their questions answered by expert legal counsel.

supreme court

Immigration Law and Policy Presentation

Jan 30, 2018, 4 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

This presentation addresses recent changes to immigration law and policy, including DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) and TPS (Temporary Protected Status), with the conversation led by expert immigration attorney Elizabeth Goss of The Law Office of Goss & Associates. We seek to provide a space for students, faculty, and staff to understand the current and evolving landscape of these policies and to answer your questions.

the supreme court

Legal Assist For Faculty and Staff on Immigration Issues

Feb 5, 2019, 9 AM, Feb 6, 2019, 12 PM
Clapp Library Room 158/159
Free and open to the public

Free 30 onsite minute consultations with immigration attorney. Feb 5, 2019, 9 AM–1 PM and Feb 6, 2019, 12 PM–4PM

the supreme court

Legal Assist For Faculty and Staff on Immigration Issues

Mar 16, 2018, 8:30 AM
Lulu Campus Center 415
Free and open to the public

Free 30 onsite minute consultations with immigration attorney. This is a confidential way to getting your questions answered. Spanish speaking consultants are available.

image of Daniel Markovits and Glenn Loury looking at camera

Daniel Markovits and Glenn Loury

Meritocracy and Its Discontents

Mar 6, 4 PM
Alumnae Hall Ballroom
Free and open to the public

A conversation between Glenn Loury and Daniel Markovits about meritocracy, its promises of fairness and equality, and its troubled past and present, moderated by Wellesley sociologist Kelly Rutherford. Can the United States be characterized as a meritocracy, given increasing levels of income inequality? Should it even aspire to be one? How did meritocracy emerge as an ideal for contemporary society, and are there alternatives that would serve our citizenry better?

Glenn Loury, the Merton P. Stolz Professor of the Social Sciences and professor of economics at Brown University, writes widely on such topics as race, social mobility, and criminal justice.

Daniel Markovits is the Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School. He specializes in legal ethics and the moral foundations of law. His most recent book is The Meritocracy Trap (2019).

Kelly Rutherford, associate professor of sociology at Wellesley, studies the effects of neoliberal policies and rising social inequality on families and parenting.

For more information, please contact:

Caryn Sowa, csowa@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

The Freedom Project, the Economics Department, and the Sociology Department.

Tyina Steptoe

Brown-Eyed Handsome Men: Sex, Race, and Rock ‘n’ Roll in the West

A Lecture by Tyina Steptoe
Feb 19, 4:30 PM, Feb 20, 12:45 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Tyina Steptoe is an associate professor of history at the University of Arizona. Her work focuses on race, gender, and popular culture in the United States. Her book, Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City (University of California Press, 2016), has received several awards, including the Kenneth Jackson Award for Best Book (North American) from the Urban History Association and the W. Turrentine Jackson Book Prize from the Western History Association. Her other writing has appeared in publications such as the American QuarterlyJournal of African American HistoryTIMEJournal of the West, and the Oxford American.

Brown-Eyed Handsome Men: Sex, Race, and Rock ‘n’ Roll in the West
Wednesday, February 19th, 4:30-6:00pm
Newhouse Center Lounge

This presentation argues for a western reorientation to the history of race, sex and early rock ‘n’ roll by looking at the arrests and convictions of musicians Chuck Berry and Baldemar Huerta, better known as Freddy Fender, in 1960. Berry was convicted of violating the Mann Act after crossing state lines with Janice Escalanti, an Apache teenager he met in El Paso. Freddy Fender, a Texas-born Mexican-American musician, was arrested for possession of a small amount of marijuana. He spent nearly three years in Angola state prison. He and his fans felt that the arrest and conviction stemmed from the fact that the married Fender was having an affair with an Anglo woman. Drawing on court documents, memoirs, and news coverage, this presentation examines the tensions that fueled these scandals: the mobility of men of color west of the Mississippi River, civil rights-era anxieties over sex and racial integration, and concerns about gender conformity in the early Cold War.
 

Open Class: Hidden Histories of Race in the Jim Crow Era
Thursday, February 20th, 12:45-2:00pm
Newhouse Center

In this open class session, Dr. Tyina Steptoe discusses her experiences researching the book, Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City, in order to highlight the limitations of traditional archival research for studies of race. The presentation especially focuses on the use of audio and visual sources to tell the stories of the Black, Creole and ethnic Mexican Houstonians not recognized in the city’s “official” records. This is a Wellesley College community event. 

Generously supported by:

the History Department, Newhouse Center and the North American West faculty reading group.

Adrienne Mayor looking at the camera and smiling

Gods and Robots: Myths and Ancient Dreams of Technology

A Lecture by Adrienne Mayor
Mar 3, 3:45 PM, Mar 4, 12:45 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Gods and Robots: Myths and Ancient Dreams of Technology
Tuesday, March 3rd, 3:45-5:15pm
Newhouse Center Lounge

Who first imagined robots? As early as Homer, Greek myths envisioned automated servants, self-moving devices, and AI—and grappled with ethical concerns about technology.

This talk explores how some of today’s most advanced innovations in robotics and artificial intelligence were foreshadowed in classical antiquity.

Adrienne Mayor is a research scholar in classics and the history of science at Stanford University. Her most recent book is Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of Technology; other books include The First Fossil Hunters, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women; and a biography of Mithradates, The Poison King (National Book Award finalist).

Open Class Session
Wednesday, March 4th, 12:45-1:45pm
Newhouse Center Lounge

An open class session for Wellesley College students. Lunch will be provided.

Generously supported by:

Co-sponsored by the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, the Department of Classical Studies, and the Department of Computer Science.

image of three people each crouching behind a table with a bowl on it, all of their mouths are open like they are yelling

Wellesley College Theatre Presents: The Infinite Wrench

With the New York Neo-Futurists
Feb 25, 7 PM
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Free and open to the public

The Infinite Wrench is a barrage of 30 original plays performed in random order—a theatrical race against an onstage clock set for one hour. Each play offers something different, be it funny, profound, elegant, disgusting, topical, irrelevant, terrifying, or a song; all are truthful and tackle the here and now, inspired by the lived experiences of the performers.

The New York Neo-Futurists are a diverse collective of writer-director-performers who create theater that is a fusion of storytelling, sport, poetry, and living newspaper. The group has been nominated for three Drama Desk Awards and more than a dozen New York Innovative Theatre Awards and featured in the New York Times, the New York Post, and Howlround. During their four-day residency, the New York Neo-Futurists will be visiting classes, conducting workshops, and performing on both the Wellesley and Babson campuses. No two events will be the same!

surrealist collage of a ballerina in space

"Cosmic Ballerina, Part 3 Art Print"

And Then Came Dance: The Women Who Led Volynsky to Ballet’s Magic Kingdom

A Lecture by Professor Stanley Rabinowitz, Amherst College
Feb 20, 8 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

Professor Stanley Rabinowitz, Amherst College, discusses his book And Then Came Dance and the women who played a major role in Akin Volynsky's life in the 1890s through the early 1920s.

Presenting for the first time Akim Volynsky's (1861-1926) pre-balletic writings on Leonardo da Vinci, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Otto Weininger, and on such illustrious personalities as Zinaida Gippius, Ida Rubinstein, and Lou Andreas-Salome, And Then Came Dance provides new insight into the origins of Volynsky's life-altering journey to become Russia's foremost ballet critic. A man for whom the realm of art was largely female in form and whose all-encompassing image of woman constituted the crux of his aesthetic contemplation that crossed over into the personal and libidinal, Volynsky looks ahead to another Petersburg-bred high priest of classical dance, George Balanchine. With an undeniable proclivity toward ballet's female component, Volynsky's dance writings, illuminated by examples of his earlier gendered criticism, invite speculation on how truly ground-breaking and forward-looking this critic is.

For more information, please contact:

ksangoja@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Maria Opasnov Tyler ’52 Fund

Image Credit:

Eugenia Loli