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Image from Krimes film

ART & KRIMES BY KRIMES

May 7, 8 PM
Davis Plaza
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

Join the Davis Museum for an outdoor film screening in conjunction with the exhibition Prison Nation.

Krimes is a story of confinement and freedom, of loss and creation.

While locked-up for six years in federal prison, artist Jesse Krimes secretly creates monumental works of art—including an astonishing 40-foot mural made with prison bed sheets, hair gel, and newspaper. He smuggles out each panel piece-by-piece with the help of fellow artists, only seeing the mural in totality upon coming home. As Jesse’s work captures the art world's attention, he struggles to adjust to life outside, living with the threat that any misstep will trigger a life sentence.

The film includes animation created by acclaimed animator Molly Schwartz in collaboration with Jesse Krimes. The original score is by composer Amanda Jones in collaboration with formerly incarcerated musicians who are alumni of Musicambia. Krimes is directed by Alysa Nahmias.

This is an in-person event, open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol.

Run time: 1:25:00

MTV Documentary Films presents an AJNA production in association with Wavelength & Giving Voice Films

For more information, please contact:

afears@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Still from ART & KRIMES BY KRIMES. Courtesy of AJNA Films and MTV Documentary Films.

Yellow background with pink text that says The Ruhlman Conference

The 25th Annual Ruhlman Conference

A Celebration of Student Achievement
Apr 26, 8:45 AM–4:15 PM
Science Center
See access restrictions below

The Ruhlman Conference celebrates intellectual life by sponsoring a communal, public event where students have an opportunity to present their work to a wide audience. By providing an opportunity for public presentation of what is often a private, isolated activity, the conference demonstrates that research can be part of the ongoing conversation in a community of scholars.

This is an in-person event, open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol. Visitors outside the Wellesley College testing protocol will need to register and provide proof of vaccination.

The program schedule and poster sessions are available on the Ruhlman Conference websiteNote: the Fowler Public Speaking Prize Competition will be livestreamed at wellesley.edu/live.

The conference is made possible by the generosity of Barbara Peterson Ruhlman ’54. This year’s conference honors Barbara’s outstanding leadership and her legacy at Wellesley. In 1997, Lee Cuba, Professor of Sociology and former Dean of the College, worked with Barbara Ruhlman to develop the plan for the Ruhlman Conference.

 

For more information, please contact:

ruhlman@wellesley.edu

A chamber music society group performs on stage

Chamber Music Society Spring Concerts

Apr 24, Apr 27, May 1, May 3, May 4
Jewett Auditorium
See access restrictions below

Founded in 1958, The Chamber Music Society of Wellesley College provides an opportunity for instrumentalists and vocalists to prepare and perform works for small ensembles. Each chamber group receives weekly coaching from a member of the Wellesley College Music Department, and performs at one of several concerts held at the end of each semester.

The Chamber Music Marathon will be held on Sunday, April 24 from 12 to 4:30 PM in Jewett Auditorium. The four concerts will be held in Jewett Auditorium at the following dates and times:

Wednesday, April 27, 7 PM

Sunday, May 1, 2 PM

Tuesday, May 3, 7 PM

Wednesday, May 4, 7 PM

These are in-person events, open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol with their College ID. All others may view the livestream on the Concert Series YouTube Channel.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund

Basileus Zeno, Anton Liagusha, Binalakshmi Nepram

War, Conflict, and Academic Freedom

Apr 21, 4 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

War silences academic freedom. Scholars are being uprooted once again as the war in Ukraine escalates. New University in Exile Consortium fellow scholars from Ukraine, Syria, and Manipur, India will reflect on the irreversible damage caused by war and conflict on academic freedom both in their home countries and in their exile-homes. This event is organized by the Freedom Project. 

Please register in advance via Zoom.

Panelists: 

  • Anton Liagusha, Ukraine; Associate Professor, Shar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University
  • Binalakshmi Nepram, Manipur, India; Founder, Manipur Women Gun Survivors Network & Global Alliance of Indigenous Peoples, Gender Justice and Peace
  • Basileus Zeno, Syria; Karl Loewenstein Fellow & Lecturer in Political Science, Amherst College
  • Moderated by Nazan Bedirhanoglu, Postdoctoral Fellow & Interim Director of the Freedom Project, Wellesley College
For more information, please contact:

nbedirha@wellesley.edu

Linda M. Williams, Stephanie D. Block, Kate B. MacDougall, Hannah M. Johnson, Thomas King

Prosecution of Child Sexual Abuse: Overcoming Challenges to Achieve Justice

Apr 25, 1 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

In recognition of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, the Wellesley Centers for Women and Massachusetts Children’s Alliance have joined together to co-host a webinar on the prosecution of child sexual abuse. During the program, Dr. Stephanie Block, Dr. Linda M. Williams, and Graduate Student Dr. Hannah M. Johnson will share insights from their white paper, Prosecution of Child Sexual Abuse: Challenges in Achieving Justice. They will be joined by Assistant District Attorney Kate MacDougall who will discuss the relevance of this work to the field.

The white paper is based on a study, funded by the National Institute of Justice, of 500 child sexual abuse reports to determine which reports resulted in prosecution and which cases made it to trial. The study examined the characteristics of cases that dropped out of the criminal justice system along the way and identified many of the obstacles that prosecutors, child victims and their caregivers, and child advocates face in responding to these cases.

Please register in advance for this event.

Panelists:

  • Linda M. Williams, Ph.D., Director of the Justice and Gender-Based Violence Research Initiative; Senior Research Scientist, Wellesley Centers for Women
  • Stephanie D. Block, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Kate B. MacDougall, J.D., Assistant District Attorney; Chief, Family Crimes and Sexual Assault Unit, Essex District Attorney's Office
  • Hannah M. Johnson, Ph.D., Recent Doctoral Candidate in Applied Psychology and Prevention Science, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Moderated by Thomas King, LICSW, Executive Director, Massachusetts Children’s Alliance
For more information, please contact:

WCW@wellesley.edu

Coming to Our Senses book cover

Coming to our Senses: Seeing for the First Time

The Patterson Lecture, delivered by Dr. Susan Barry
Apr 25, 5:15 PM
Science Center, H105
See access restrictions below

The Neuroscience Department is pleased to present this year’s Patterson Lecture, delivered by Dr. Susan R. Barry, Professor Emeritus of Biological Sciences, Mount Holyoke College. Dr. Barry will discuss her experience of gaining 3D stereovision after a lifetime of seeing in only two dimensions, and how intensive vision therapy created new neural connections, and with them, a new view of the world.

This in-person event is open to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol. The public is invited to view the livesteam and must register in advance.

Dubbed “Stereo Sue” by neurologist Oliver Sacks in a New Yorker article by that name, Dr. Barry wrote the 2010 book, Fixing My Gaze, about her journey, as well as her newest book, Coming To Our Senses, in which she draws on the stories of two remarkable young adults to show how our brains process raw stimuli into meaning, why ‘gaining a new sense’ requires a fundamental reorganization of the brain, and how our past experiences and personal predilections influence our future observations and growth. While adapting to a new sense after childhood is immensely difficult, it’s not impossible—in the same way that adult athletes continue to train after their brains and bodies are mature, it is possible to become an “athlete of perception.”

For more information, please contact:

Sarah Schwartz, ss122@wellesley.edu

Illustration of a moor with a castle set in the background

The Moors by Jen Silverman

Wellesley College Theatre Spring ’22 Mainstage production
Apr 29, Apr 30, May 1, May 7
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre, Alumnae Hall; Virtual
Free and open to the public

Wellesley College Theatre presents its Spring ’22 Mainstage Production, The Moors by Jen Silverman, directed by Marta Rainer, and featuring an all-student cast and design team.

Two sisters and a dog live out their lives on the bleak English moors, dreaming of love and power. The arrival of a hapless governess and a moor-hen set all three on a strange and dangerous path. The Moors is a dark comedy about love, desperation, and visibility.

The production will be presented in person on April 29-May 1 at the following times:

  • April 29 at 7 PM
  • April 30 at 2 PM and 7 PM
  • May 1 at 2 PM

The production will be livestreamed on May 7 at the following times:

  • May 7 at 2 PM and 7 PM

Tickets are free, but advance registration is required (including for the livestreams). For more information, please visit the Wellesley College Theatre website.

Visitors outside the Wellesley College testing protocol will need to register using this link and provide proof of vaccination.

For more information, please contact:

wctheatre@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Anya Sheldon

Penethesilea

*POSTPONED* Amazonian Warrior Women in the Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes

A Presentation by Susanne Sreedhar
Apr 19, 4 PM
Newhouse Center Lounge/Zoom
See access restrictions below

Thomas Hobbes’s philosophy involves a fundamental shift in ideas about the theological, metaphysical, and axiological significance of sex, gender, reproduction, and the family. His political project fundamentally rejects the idea that dominion is naturally or divinely ordained, using a strategy I call dethroning. In this talk, I argue that the myth of ancient Amazonian warrior women, which he invokes in every version of his political theory, is one such act of rhetorical dethroning in that it attacks naturalized familial and gender hierarchies, denying natural parent/child, as well as husband/wife, relations of rule and subordination. Substantive discussions of Hobbes’s use of the Amazons in the secondary literature are few and consist of contradictory understandings of the example, with some seeing it as a prototype of early feminism and others seeing it as a retrenchment of misogyny and racism. I use my interpretation, one that makes sense of the example by reference to the internal logic of Hobbes’s overall philosophical and political project, in order to examine both sides of this debate.

This in-person event is open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol. No prior registration is required for community members to attend in-person.

Remote attendance is open to all. To register for remote attendance, click here.  

 

For more information, please contact:

lcote2@wellesley.edu

Bryan Stevenson

Bryan Stevenson

Bryan Stevenson: Race and the Criminal Justice System

The 2022 Betsy Wood Knapp ’64 Lecture in the Social Sciences and the 2022 Wilson Lecture
Apr 28, 5 PM
Alumnae Hall Auditorium
See access restrictions below

Wellesley College is thrilled to welcome Bryan Stevenson—founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative, a human rights organization in Montgomery, Alabama, and author of the critically acclaimed New York Times bestseller, Just Mercy, to speak about race and criminal justice with the community.

This event fits into the broader theme of 2021-22 campus events on prison organizing and resisting the carceral state, in collaboration with the Wellesley Project on Public Leadership & Action and the Prison Nation project at the Davis Museum at Wellesley College.

Wellesley College students, faculty, and staff will need a ticket to attend the event in person, which will be held in Alumnae Hall Auditorium. An email with a link to register was sent on April 11. The event will also be livestreamed on wellesley.edu/live for alumnae and the general public.

For more information, please contact:

olga.shurchkov@wellesley.edu.

Image Credit:

EJI

Sheffield Chamber Players standing together outside holding instruments

Sheffield Chamber Players

Sheffield Chamber Players Concert and Lecture

Shostakovich’s String Quartet No. 10
Apr 25, 7 PM
Pendleton West Music Salon, PNW 101
See access restrictions below

Sheffield Chamber Players return with a discussion and performance of String Quartet No.10 in A-flat major, Op.118 by Dmitri Shostakovich. Written in 1964, soon after the premiere of his 13th Symphony (“Babi Yar”), it is widely believed that this quartet expresses resentment over the active measures taken by Soviet authorities to sabotage the premiere of the symphony. Babi Yar, on the outskirts of Kyiv, is infamous as the site of one of the largest massacres of Jews by German Nazis, and the symphony was intended to pay tribute to it. Shostakovich’s fury at the double standards of the party and its pervasive antisemitism blends with his personal response to the tragedy and manifests in this simultaneously towering and intimate composition. Prior to performing the work, Sheffield artists will discuss its roots in more detail and explore musical themes developed in each of the four movements of the piece.

This is an in-person event, open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol.

For more information, please contact:

thodge@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Maria Opasnov Tyler ’52 Fund

Image Credit:

Hannah Shields Photography

Mame-Fatou Niang

Mame-Fatou Niang

French House Virtual Lecture Series: Mame-Fatou Niang

“Rethinking Universalism”
Feb 17, 12:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

This talk seeks to define universalism à la française, to think about its futures and forms in the 21st century. Based on cross-readings of Identités Françaises (Niang, Brill, 2019) and Universalisme (Niang/Suaudeau, Anamosa, 2022), the conversation will focus on key questions: Can one sketch a critique of universalism without awakening the demons of particularism and fascist passions? Without falling into the trap of identity as the basis of all and any legitimacy? What do the current upheavals in the articulation of race, class, gender and citizenship tell us about France? How have French authorities and intellectuals come to see critique and analysis from the margins as attacks on universalism? What understanding of the term, its purpose and its impact do such attitudes imply? Can 21st-century antiracism and universalism be reconciled in France?

A Zoom recording of the lecture is now available.

For more information, please contact:

Abi Sandy (as110@wellesley.edu)

Estelle Zhong Mengual

Estelle Zhong Mengual

French House Virtual Lecture Series: Estelle Zhong Mengual

“Apprendre à voir, Le point du vivant”
Apr 14, 12:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Wellesley’s French House is excited to welcome Estelle Zhong Mengual for her lecture, “Apprendre à voir, Le point du vivant.” 

This discussion will be delivered in French.

Nous héritons culturellement d’un style d’attention très particulier au vivant. Dans les œuvres de la tradition artistique occidentale, qu’elle soit picturale ou littéraire, le vivant, s’il est bien présent, est majoritairement présent pour autre chose que lui-même. Il est avant tout là comme signifiant d’un signifié humain : comme symbole ou comme miroir de nos émotions. C’est une certaine manière de voir le monde vivant, mais c’est surtout une manière de ne pas le voir : car ce qui est manqué, c’est l’altérité des autres formes de vie que la nôtre. Comment apprendre à voir le vivant autrement, en faisant de la place à ses significations autochtones, à son histoire, à ses comportements et ses relations? Comment entrer dans un autre style d’attention pour la myriade d’êtres vivants non-humains qui habitent et fabriquent notre monde commun?

Please register in advance for this event.

For more information, please contact:

Abi Sandy (as110@wellesley.edu)

Statue with black smudge lines across the eyes. White text says A solo play by Sarah Wendy Burman, directed by Josh Glenn-Kayden

Muse

An original thesis performance by Sarah Wendy Burman ’22
Apr 7, 5 PM, Apr 8, 5 PM, Apr 9, 2 PM
April 7: Tower Steps | April 8: Hay Amphitheatre | April 9: Herter Park Amphitheater, Boston
Free and open to the public

Muse is a solo play about truth, memory, and the kindling of sparks. This is a Senior Honors Thesis project by Sarah Wendy Burman ’22 for Theatre Studies at Wellesley College. You can reserve free tickets in advance. The show will take place on the following dates:

  • April 7, 5 PM, Tower Steps, Wellesley College
  • April 8, 5 PM, Hay Outdoor Amphitheatre, Wellesley College
  • April 9, 2 PM, Herter Park Amphitheater, Boston

Sarah Wendy is the recipient of the 2021-22 Catherine Masson & Claude Beauclair Fellowship.

For more information, please contact:

Sarah Vandewalle, sv104@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the 2021-22 Catherine Masson & Claude Beauclair Fellowship

Image Credit:

Sarah Wendy Burman ’22

Portrait of Carla Canales

Guest Artist in Residence: Carla Canales

Lecture, Q&A, and Workshops
Apr 14, Apr 20
Jewett Auditorium
See access restrictions below

Carla Dirlikov Canales is an internationally-renowned mezzo-soprano who has also received recognition as a cultural entrepreneur and social advocate. Join us for several exciting events of Ms. Canales’ residency!  

These are in-person events, open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol with their College ID. All others may view the livestream on the Concert Series YouTube Channel.
 

Workshop: Cultural Diplomacy
March 2, 5-6:15 PM
Jewett Auditorium

This session will explore how to harness the power of culture to advance foreign policy objectives. It aims to fill an important but often overlooked angle in current foreign policy debates and add a valuable dimension to cocurricular discussions in international affairs. Led by Carla Canales, who has been an active Arts Envoy for the U.S. State Department since 2005. During the workshop, participants will become familiar with the history of U.S. cultural diplomacy and will better understand how the power of the arts has repeatedly been deployed by the U.S. government to help achieve foreign policy objectives. 

 

Midday Muse: Building Nonprofits - Hear Her Song
April 14, 1 PM
Jewett Auditorium

Carla Canales, Founder and Director of The Canales Project, a nonprofit organization that gives voice to issues of identity through music, will highlight the initiative, “Hear Her Song,” which honors extraordinary women leaders around the world through new songs inspired by their words. This session will discuss how and when to build a nonprofit organization and will look at how an advocacy project can create positive social impact.
 

Workshop: Artist as Entrepreneur
April 20, 5 PM
Jewett Room 209

This workshop will focus on developing a plan to tackle your goals as an entrepreneur or performing artist. Actively discover your driving passions, identify your strengths, and determine your vision and goals to create a strategy that realizes your purpose. We will translate business terminology and apply it toward creating and executing an artistic vision.

Carla Canales has been praised by Opera Magazine for a voice that “grabs the heartstrings with its dramatic force and musicality” and is known for her portrayal of Carmen, which she has played close to 100 times in over 12 countries. She is the first singer to receive a Sphinx Medal of Excellence, Michigan Alliance for the Arts Lifetime Achievement Award, University of Michigan Bicentennial Alumni Award, named a Leading Global Thinker by Foreign Policy, engaged as a Turnaround Artist on the President’s Committee for the Arts, and was named one of Musical America’s 30 Movers and Shapers of 2018. In 2016 she founded The Canales Project, a non-profit that gives voice to issues of identity through music.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund and the Florence Jeup Ford ’22, Mary M. Crawford ’22, and Virginia Ford ’48 Artist in Residence Endowment Fund

Student at the carillon with instructor behind them.

Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs Spring Concerts

Apr 30
Academic Quad
Free and open to the public

The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the 90-year tradition of bell-ringing in Galen Stone Tower, begun when the carillon was installed in 1931. Directed by Margaret Angelini. 

There are three spring concerts:

Saturday, February 26, 1 PM

Cari-Radio: Students perform their favorite pop tunes and movie music, arranged especially for the Wellesley bells. The event will be recorded and broadcast on Wellesley Public Media's local TV channel, and posted on the Concert Series YouTube Channel afterwards.

Saturday, April 2, 1 PM

Alumnae Carillonneurs Carla Staffaroni ’13, Michelle Lam ’14 and Isabelle Chen ’17 return for a musical visit to Wellesley.

Saturday, April 30, 1 PM

Change Ringing: come on up and try playing the bells yourself! We provide the music, you provide the fun.
 

In addition to listening from campus, you can view the livestream on the Concert Series YouTube Channel.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund

Camera Palaestina cover

Decolonizing Photography: Redistributing the Orientalist Archive

A Presentation by Mary L. Cornille Professor Stephen Sheehi
Apr 27, 4 PM
Newhouse Center Lounge & Zoom
See access restrictions below

Wasif Jawhariyyeh’s seven photograph albums offer an “illustrated history of Palestine.” Jawhariyyeh was personal fixture of the social, cultural, and political scene of late Ottoman and British “Mandate” Palestine. Along with his role as an Ottoman and a British colonial bureaucrat in Jerusalem, he also was a musician, composer, collector, and chronicler of life in Palestine before the mass expulsion of Palestinians by Zionist militias from their homeland in 1948. This talk will argue for reading that retools Jawhariyyeh’s albums as a re-appropration of Orientalist photographic images in order to redistribute them, returning them to their rightful space and time in a reclaimed Palestinian physical, historical, and visual geography.

Paying deference to the recent case by Tamara Lanier, who has raised a lawsuit against Harvard University, which still imprisons her captive great-great grandfather in the form of his image, one might ask what does decolonizing photography truly look like? 

This work is based in Sheehi’s forthcoming co-authored book, Camera Palaestina: Displaced Histories of Palestinian Photography (University of California Press, 2022).

This in-person event is open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol. No prior registration is required for community members to attend in-person.

Remote attendance is free and open to the public. Click here to register for remote attendance

For more information, please contact:

lcote2@wellesley.edu

Helen F. Ladd

Helen F. Ladd ’67

The Diane Silvers Ravitch ’60 Lecture

How Charter Schools Disrupt Good Education Policy
Apr 12, 4 PM
Jewett Auditorium
See access restrictions below

Charter schools are publicly funded schools that operate outside traditional public school systems. Started in Minnesota in the early 1990s, they have spread across the country and now enroll more than 6 percent of all K-12 students in the U.S. — and more than 40 percent in some urban districts. Moreover, charter school enrollments have been increasing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In this lecture, economist and Wellesley graduate Helen F. Ladd ’67 draws on her many years of education research to spell out four central requirements of good education policy in the U.S. She then explains how charter schools undermine each of them. She argues that, first and foremost, good education policy requires a coherent education system with sufficient public funding for a state to meet its constitutionally mandated education responsibilities. Good policy also requires that policy makers attend to the educational challenges associated with child poverty and that they promote equal educational opportunity for students of all races. Finally, good education policy requires public accountability for a broad set of valued education outcomes.

Although some charter schools may be less disruptive to good policy than others, and some undoubtedly produce positive outcomes for certain students, Ladd argues that charter schools, as currently designed and operated, typically do far more to interfere with, rather than to promote, good education policy in the U.S.

This is an in-person event, open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol. The event will also be livestreamed at www.wellesley.edu/live.

For more information, please contact:

Jeanne Hicks, jhicks2@wellesley.edu or Soo Hong, shong@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Diane Silvers Ravitch ’60 Lecture Fund

Two young women standing outside, each holding a cell phone at arms length and taking selfie photos

A Moscow rally on March 18, 2022, celebrating the anniversary of Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea.

“Russia: What Next?”

Kathryn W. Davis Memorial Lecture: Speaker, Ivan Kurilla, Professor of History and International Relations, European University at St. Petersburg
Apr 5, 8 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Ivan Kurilla, Professor of History and International Relations at the European University at St. Petersburg, will explore the experience of Russia’s war in Ukraine through Russian eyes, and look toward the future. Who or what is responsible for this catastrophic war? What do Russian people know about its progress, and how do various sectors of society feel about it? What is the possibility and trajectory of the future reintegration of Russia into the community of nations? Professor Kurilla will address these and related questions in a presentation whose main focus will be the complexity of Russian society at this moment, and his hopes for that portion of it that might eventually come to construct a new Russia.

Please register in advance to attend this discussion.

For more information, please contact:

ntumarki@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Russian Area Studies Program and History Department, Wellesley College; and the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University

Image Credit:

Pavel Bedniakov/Pool/TASS

Image from the cover of Memory Lands: King Philip's War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast, by Christine M. DeLucia

Image from the cover of Memory Lands: King Philip's War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast, by Christine M. DeLucia

Indigenous Memoryscapes in Natick and Wellesley

Reckoning with the Past for Healing, Justice, and a Shared Future
Apr 12, 3:30–5 PM
Zoom
See access restrictions below

From Wellesley’s Lake Waban to Natick’s monument to John Eliot, our local landscape tells a story about the violent conquest now known as King Philip’s War. How do these sites of memory justify violence and affirm white settlers' (and their descendants) claims to stolen land? How have local indigenous peoples produced alternative memories of resistance, healing, and cultural survivance? In a collaborative conversation, Kristen Wyman (Nipmuc) and Christine DeLucia will shed light on these contested memories and their enduring significance in our community. 

Christine DeLucia, Associate Professor of History, Williams College, is author of Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast (2018). Her teaching, scholarship, and public humanities projects focus on how communities across the Northeast cultivate relationships with the past, and draw upon what has come before to shape the present and future.  

Kristen Wyman (Nipmuc), advocates for BIPOC communities in the areas of gender-based violence, substance abuse prevention, youth development, food sovereignty, and transformative leadership. Her work is deeply personal and motivated by the important roles of indigenous womxn as landholders, farmers, culture bearers, artisans and diplomats.

This virtual event is free and open to the public. Advance registration is required. Click here to register

For more information, please contact:

lcote2@wellesley.edu

Jamie Baum

Guest Artist: Jamie Baum Workshops

Apr 3, Apr 8
April 3: Jewett Auditorium | April 8: PNW 201
See access restrictions below

These are in-person workshops, open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol with their College ID. All others may view the recordings on the Concert Series YouTube Channel.

Students are encouraged to register in advance to ensure they can participate, but registration is not required.

A Fear-Free Approach to Improvisation for the Classically-Trained Flutist™
April 3, 12:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium

This workshop is specifically for the classically-trained flutist -(or musician)- designed to demystify the fear as well as the notion that one must be born with the talent to improvise and “play by ear” — offering accessible techniques and concepts that can be applied not only to jazz but also to any style of music. This appearance of Altus Flute Artist Jamie Baum has been made possible, in part, through an Educational Grant from Altus Flutes. Jamie Baum performs exclusively on Altus Flutes.

 

Sunday Muse: Guest Artist Jamie Baum
April 3, 2 PM
Jewett Auditorium

Meet Guest Artist Jamie Baum, and learn about her journey and inspirations in this informal lecture/demonstration and question/answer session.

 

A Fear-Free Approach to Jazz Composition for the Improvising Musician™
April 8, 12:45 PM
PNW 201

This workshop is specifically for the improvising musician — designed to offer the most basic stepping stones to composing jazz tunes while deepening one’s understanding of melody, harmony and form through “the art of the contrafact” — offering accessible techniques and concepts that can be applied not only to jazz but to any style of music.
 

Jamie Baum, NYC flutist, composer, Sunnyside Records artist, producer and clinician, has toured the US and over 35 countries performing at major festivals, clubs, and concert halls. Though focusing primarily on jazz, she has been involved in several projects, performances, and tours performing classical, new music, Brazilian, and Latin music.

 

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Marjorie Copland Baum Memorial Fund and the Florence Jeup Ford ’22, Mary M. Crawford ’22, and Virginia Ford ’48 Artist in Residence Endowment Fund.

In the Peach Tree, Elk Grove, California (2013), by Kathya Landeros

In the Peach Tree, Elk Grove, California (2013)

Gallery Talk by Prof. Kathya Landeros

Apr 6, 5 PM
Newhouse Center Lounge & Zoom
See access restrictions below

Join the Newhouse Center and Office of Intercultural Education for a gallery talk by Kathya Landeros, Knafel Assistant Professor of Humanities and Assistant Professor of Art. In this LatinX month presentation, Prof. Landeros explores the inspiration and processes behind her photography series Verdant Land, Hombrecitos & Mujercitas, and West. All three exhibitions are currently on display in the Newhouse Center Lounge (Green Hall 237) and in the Founders/Green Humanities Commons (FND-300CC). 

This in-person event is open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol. No prior registration is required for community members to attend in-person.

Remote access is free and open to the public. Please click here to register for remote attendance.

 

For more information, please contact:

lcote2@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Office of Intercultural Education

Image Credit:

Kathya Landeros

Shaharzad Akbar, Pashtana Durrani, Sayed Hassan Hussaini (Akhlaq), Said Reza Kazemi

Women, Gender, Afghanistan

Mar 29, 12:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Women and girls in Afghanistan have been the focus of the international community since the early 2000s, triggered by the United States war in Afghanistan. The initial narrative of ‘saving the Afghan women’ was instrumental in the justification of the U.S.-led military operations and the war on terror. The international feminist movement, including many Afghan women, criticized this discourse, highlighting women’s agency and women’s own longstanding struggle for rights in their own country.

Twenty years later, on the heels of the United States’ withdrawal from Afghanistan and the return of Taliban rule, women’s rights are once again at stake. As women human rights activists and scholars, many of whom grew up during a period of relative freedom only to have it taken away, and whose rights and daily existence are now threatened under the Taliban regime, relocate in the U.S. and other countries, we are in a position to deepen our understanding about the situation by hearing from Afghan women leaders directly. How did women in Afghanistan fight for their rights over the last two decades? To what extent did women’s status in society change? What will happen to women’s rights and to the legacy of women’s activism in the country in the near and medium term? And what is the foundational nature of gender in Afghanistan?

This program, which features experts on human rights and gender politics in Afghanistan, will address these questions and more.

Panelists:

  • Shaharzad Akbar, Fellow in Human Rights with Chatham House, former Chairperson for Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission
  • Pashtana Durrani, Visiting Fellow, Wellesley Centers for Women
  • Sayed Hassan Hussaini (Akhlaq), Adjunct Professor, Coppin State University
  • Said Reza Kazemi, Visiting Researcher, Heidelberg University
  • Moderated by Nazan Bedirhanoglu, Postdoctoral Fellow in Political Science; Interim Director, Freedom Project, Wellesley College
     

To attend this event, please register using this link.

This virtual discussion is co-organized by the Wellesley Centers for Women and the Freedom Project, in collaboration with Scholars At Risk and the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts University.

For more information, please contact:

wcw@wellesley.edu

Illustration of a sun with an eye at the center, next to birds and fish migrating

Mobile Precarity: Visual Impairment and Filipino Migrant Labor in Hawaiʻi

The Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Class of 1956 Distinguished Speaker Series
Mar 31, 4 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public
As part of the Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Class of 1956 Distinguished Speaker Series, Dr. Christine Peralta, Assistant Professor of History and Sexuality, Women's and Gender Studies at Amherst College, will examine Filipino migrant labor in Hawaii (1909-1938) from the perspective of disability and health. To better illustrate the unique historical intersection of Filipino labor and disability, she offers the concept of “mobile precarity.”
 
Dr. Peralta argues that “mobile precarity” highlights the multiple health risks that migration within U.S. empire posed for Filipino laborers, as inadequate health care, hazardous work environments and ableist exclusionary policies hindered the opportunities of Filipino migration. Therefore, Filipino workers illuminate how labor was contingent on the relationship between sugarcane and sight, and the duress suffered through injury forced planters to reveal their contradictory uses of the language of fitness and the technology of medical science to engender the precarity of Filipinos as the ongoing reality of colonial labor in Hawaiʻi.
 
To attend the virtual discussion, please use this Zoom link
 
This event is co-sponsored by: The Faculty Group on the North American West, Environmental Studies, Women's & Gender Studies, and American Studies.
For more information, please contact:

Ashanti Shih (as121@wellesley.edu)

Illustration of woman climbing hill on a line graph

The Economy She Deserves Summit

Building an Agenda for a Women-Centered Recovery
Apr 1, Apr 2
Virtual
Free and open to the public

The COVID-19 pandemic hit women hard, with disproportionate job losses for women in general and Black and Hispanic women in particular, and with working mothers facing impossible choices as schools and childcare centers closed.   

But the pandemic only underlined an ongoing lack of support for women in the American workplace—with gaps in pay, promotions, and respect on the job; with unequal caregiving obligations at home; and without universal paid leave and affordable child care to help them fulfill their dueling responsibilities. Even with a recovery well underway, a recent McKinsey survey found that one in three women in corporate America said that they’d considered downshifting their careers or leaving the workplace entirely in 2021.   

Wellesley College, together with Spelman College and the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership at King’s College London, will convene a two-day virtual summit, The Economy She Deserves: Building an Agenda for a Women-Centered Recovery, funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The summit will bring together researchers, policymakers, business leaders, and advocates from around the world to understand what drives gender-based economic inequality and to articulate a powerful agenda for building a future with women’s needs and aspirations at the center.

April 1, 9 AM - 12 PM EST

April 2, 9 AM - 12 PM EST

Speakers will include Claudia Goldin, Harvard University; Jennifer Klein, White House Gender Policy Council; Heather Long, Washington Post; C. Nicole Mason, Institute for Women’s Policy Research; Gloria Perez, Women’s Foundation of Minnesota; and Betsey Stevenson, University of Michigan—with more to come.

Please visit the summit website to learn more and to register.

For more information, please contact:

economyshedeserves@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Carnegie Corporation of New York

Image Credit:

Illustration by Efi Chalikopoulou

Film still

Ethical Encounters: Women, War, and Cinema in Bangladesh

A Presentation by Elora Chowdhury
Apr 25, 4 PM
Hybrid
See access restrictions below

Ethical Encounters is an exploration of the intersection of feminism, human rights, and memory to illuminate how visual practices of recollecting violent legacies in Bangladeshi cinema can conjure a global cinematic imagination for the advancement of humanity. By examining contemporary, women-centered Muktijuddho cinema—features and documentaries that focus on the Bangladesh Liberation War of 1971—Newhouse Center fellow Elora Chowdhury (UMASS Boston) shows how these films imagine, disrupt, and reinscribe a gendered nationalist landscape of trauma, freedom, and agency. Chowdhury analyzes Bangladeshi feminist films including Meherjaan, and Itihaash Konna (Daughters of History), as well as socially-engaged films by activist-filmmakers including Jonmo Shathi (Born Together), and Shadhinota (A Certain Liberation), to show how war films of Bangladesh can generate possibilities for gender justice. 

Elora Halim Chowdhury is Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She is the author of Transnationalism Reversed: Women Organizing Against Gendered Violence in Bangladesh, which won the National Women’s Studies Association’s Gloria Anzaldúa Book Prize. She is the coeditor of South Asian Filmscapes: Transregional Encounters; Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human Rights: History, Politics, Practice; and Dissident Friendships: Feminism, Imperialism, and Transnational Solidarity.

This in-person event is open only to students, staff, and faculty in the Wellesley College testing protocol. No prior registration is required for community members to attend in-person.

Remote access is free and open to the public. Click here to register for remote attendance

For more information, please contact:

lcote2@wellesley.edu