content

text that says "presidential election 2020" with an illustration of red elephant and blue donkey

The Outlook for the 2020 Election

Faculty Panel Discussion of Key Points and Takeaways from the Presidential Debates
Oct 28, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

The last of three Presidential debates will take place on Thursday, October 22, 2020. Will the debates give us a glimpse of what to expect from the upcoming election? What will be the most debated points and policy stances, and what might be missing? The Knapp Social Science Center and the CPLA invite you to join Wellesley social science faculty for a debrief, conversation, and Q&A.

Faculty panelists: Maneesh Arora, assistant professor of political science; Jennifer Chudy, Knafel Assistant Professor of Social Sciences, assistant professor of political science; Erich Matthes, associate professor of philosophyfrom, director of the Frost Center for the Environment; Daniel Sichel, professor of economics; Natali Valdez, assistant professor of women’s and gender studies.

This event is open to Wellesley College faculty, staff, students, and alumnae.

Please register in advance.

For more information, please contact:

kssc@wellesley.edu

Samantha Harris

Title IX and Sexual Misconduct on Campus

A Discussion with Samantha Harris
Nov 11, 4:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

This talk will cover the history of Title IX, the changes to its enforcement under the Obama and Trump administrations, and will discuss how colleges can protect students from discrimination without compromising free speech and due process rights.

Title IX, the law prohibiting sex discrimination in federally funded educational institutions, has led colleges and universities to set up parallel justice systems that adjudicate claims of some of society’s most serious crimes — but often without any of the procedural protections normally afforded to people facing such serious accusations. This past May, the Department of Education implemented new Title IX regulations that provide many important procedural protections, but opponents of these regulations are already attacking them both in court and on campus.

Samantha Harris is a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education and is of counsel to the firm of Mudrick & Zucker, where she concentrates her practice in the areas of campus discipline, Title IX, and free speech. For more than 15 years, she has advised students, faculty, administrators, and attorneys on issues of free speech and due process on campus. She lectures regularly about students' rights at campuses and conferences around the country, including at the Judicial Conferences of the Third and Fourth Circuits. Ms. Harris has been published in Inside Higher Ed, the New York Daily News, Reason, The Washington Post, Vox, and other publications, and has represented FIRE on ESPN, Fox News, NPR, and more. Ms. Harris received her undergraduate degree in Politics from Princeton University in 1999, and went on to earn her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2002. She completed a judicial clerkship with the late Judge Jay C. Waldman of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

Please register in advance.

Place Holder

Student Panel: Sharing our Expertise on Campaigns and Elections

Nov 10, 5:30–6:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

A discussion with Wellesley students Pilar Birriel ’22, Jenn Horkovich ’22, and Avery Lumeng ’21 about their experiences campaigning during the 2020 election cycle. Topics will include campaigning during a pandemic and with Trump on the ticket. Moderated by Maneesh Arora, assistant professor of political science.

Please check back for updated registration information.

This event is part of the Wellesley College 2020 Election Speaker Series and #WellesleyVotes.

 

Generously supported by:

the political science department, the Project on Public Leadership & Action, Wellesley in Washington, the Slater International Center, and the Wellesley College Alumnae Association.

placeholder

Election Wrap-Up Panel

Nov 4
Virtual
Free and open to the public

A day-after wrap-up discussion of the 2020 presidential election with Welleslsey faculty.

Panelists

Please check back for updated information on event time and registration link.

This event is part of the Wellesley College 2020 Election Speaker Series and #WellesleyVotes.

Generously supported by:

the political science department, the Project on Public Leadership & Action, Wellesley in Washington, the Slater International Center, and the Wellesley College Alumnae Association.

Hahrie Han

Reclaiming People Power in 2021

A Conversation with Hahrie Han
Nov 18, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Join Laura Grattan, Jane Bishop ’51 Associate Professor of Political Science, for a conversation with Hahrie Han about building grassroots power in the aftermath of the 2020 election. This event is part of #WellesleyVotes.

Hahrie Han is the Inaugural Director of the SNF Agora Institute and Faculty Director of the P3 Research Lab at Johns Hopkins University. She is an expert on political participation, social movements, collective action, and organizing, and was formerly a professor in the Political Science Department at Wellesley.

Please check back for registration information.

Generously supported by:

the PPLA.

Lisa D. Cook

Lisa D. Cook.

The 2020 Goldman Lecture in Economics

150 Years of Violence and Economic Implications for Today
Nov 11, 2:30 PM
Virtual
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

Lisa D. Cook, professor of economics and international relations at Michigan State University, will deliver the 2020 Goldman Lecture in Economics: 150 Years of Violence and Economic Implications for Today.

In a recent paper, Cook shows the negative impact of violence on innovative activity and economic activity using patent and other data from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Given recent events, she will present these findings, as well as how the evidence informs our understanding of current racial and political violence and its implications for economic and broader outcomes.

Please register in advance.

For more information, please contact:

sdatz@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Marshall I. Goldman Fund

Marguerite Duras and Barney Rosset, 1969

Marguerite Duras and Barney Rosset, 1969

Transatlantic Pacts: America and the Production of Postwar French Literature

A Newhouse at Home Presentation by Sara Kippur
Dec 3, 4–5:15 PM
Virtual
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

While at the Newhouse Center, I will be working on my current book project, a literary history tentatively titled Transatlantic Pacts: America and the Production of Postwar French Literature. The book demonstrates how institutional shifts in the U.S.—in literary journalism, the expansion of Hollywood, the rise of television, and the explosion of the college textbook industry—transformed how French literature was produced and read both in America as well as, more surprisingly, in France itself. Drawing on archival collections in France and the U.S., Transatlantic Pacts examines a slate of unknown, and lesser known, literary materials to show ties between American cultural institutions and the writing of some of France’s most renowned postwar writers—authors such as Samuel Beckett, Assia Djebar, Marguerite Duras, Romain Gary, Eugène Ionesco, Alain Robbe-Grillet, and Jean-Paul Sartre.

My Newhouse presentation will focus on the French writer Marguerite Duras (see image above), whose 1959 film Hiroshima mon amour earned her an Academy Award nomination for best original screenplay. In light of new archival discoveries, my talk asks how we might take a renewed look at one of Duras’ most well-regarded novels, The Ravishing of Lol V. Stein (1964), knowing now that she originally wrote the book as a screenplay for American television audiences. The talk will situate this discussion through a comparative examination of television and media culture in France and the U.S. in the early 1960s. This presentation will also feature commentary from Professor Codruța Morari (CAMS, French).

Sara Kippur is Associate Professor of French at Trinity College in Hartford, CT, where she also serves as Chair of the Department of Language & Culture Studies (on leave in 2020-21). Her research is at the intersection of 20th-21st century French and Francophone literature, translation studies, cultural studies, and book history. She has published a scholarly monograph on modern and contemporary self-translators, titled Writing It Twice: Self-translation and the Making of a World Literature in French (Northwestern, 2015), and she is co-editor of the volume Being Contemporary: French Literature, Culture, and Politics Today (Liverpool, 2016), which examines current, pressing issues in the field of French Studies.

This event will be a workshop-style presentation of Professor Kippur's work in progress. Pre-registration is required. Please click here to sign up.

Post charge gallop at Little Bighorn

Remembering the Battle of Greasy Grass, aka The Battle of Little Bighorn

A Newhouse at Home Presentation by Professor Elena Creef
Nov 11, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

On June 25th every year, a multi-generational group of some 30 Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho riders on horseback conclude a weeklong journey across Montana that formally ends with a powerful ceremonial charge to the top of what is known as “Last Stand Hill” in order to remember their ancestors’ historic 1876 victory over the U.S. Army and the defeat of General George Armstrong Custer and the 7th Cavalry. The event is neither a performance nor a reenactment. Instead, it is a sacred Native American Prayer Ride. 

For the past four years, I have been one of the few non-Native participants on this annual Ride to Little Bighorn where I have been honored to serve as part of the camp cook crew, occasional horse wrangler, and even informal documentary photographer. This auto-ethnographic presentation will share my visual record of this Ride that has also inspired my first public humanities project.

Following the presentation, Professor Genevieve Clutario (American Studies) will provide a response to Professor Creef's presentation. An open Q&A session will follow. 

This event is open to members of the Wellesley College community. Pre-registration is required. Please click here to register. 

 
For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote at lcote2@wellesley.edu.

Image Credit:

Image courtesy of Elena Creef

On Being a Pacifist Critic

On Being a Pacifist Critic

A Newhouse at Home Presentation by Professor Larry Rosenwald
Sep 23, 2:30 PM
Virtual
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

We have no account of pacifist criticism. On Being a Pacifist Critic will provide one. It understands pacifism as both a radical idea and a tenable one, and explores how that idea shapes the literary and cultural criticism of those committed to it. As such it is necessarily personal and partial, shaped and limited by my perspectives and reading. (It is, for example, centered in the literary and pacifist traditions of Europe and the United States.) It is divided into five sections. The first three are conceptually simple: a prologue setting our my pacifist and critical perspectives, an account of antiwar literature, an account of pacifist writers. The last two are more complicated. The fourth discusses manifestations in literary texts of what the Quaker diarist John Woolman called "the seeds of war," e.g., military metaphors; the fifth discusses manifestations of what Denise Levertov called "peace" an energy field more intense than war," e.g., scenes of durable, vibrant harmony.

This virtual event is open to all members of the Wellesley College community. Pre-registration is required. Please click here to register.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote at lcote2@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Copyright Bill Watterson

abstract photo of white hands against blue background

Edie Bresler, 5 participants (2 days, 3 places), 2019, Four unique cyanotypes on archival vellum, 18 x 48 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Virtual Artist Talk Series: Edie Bresler

Oct 22, 5–6:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Join Patricia Berman, Theodora L. and Stanley H. Feldberg Professor of Art at Wellesley College, in conversation with photographer Edie Bresler, who creates cyanotypes as a premise for chance encounters that become both a subject of investigation and a strategy of engagement. 

Registration is required.

 

Davis Museum: Handmade Photography Today Virtual Artist Talk Series
In conjunction with the exhibition, Making, Not Taking: Portrait Photography in the 19th Century, the Davis Museum presents a series of virtual artist talks to explore contemporary iterations of nineteenth-century photographic processes. This fall, join us for conversations with Takashi Arai, Edie Bresler, Myra Greene, and Will Wilson.

Co-hosted with the Photographic Resource Center.

Generously supported by:

the Bern Schwartz Family Foundation

Philippe Blanchet

Philippe Blanchet: Glottophobie: discriminations à prétexte linguistique

Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies
Oct 7, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

The French Department welcomes Philippe Blanchet, professor of socio-linguistics, Université Rennes 2, to deliver a lecture, Glottophobie: discriminations à prétexte linguistique, as part of a virtual colloquia series Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies.

This disucssion will be delivered in French. Please register via Zoom.

This series features eminent scholars examining the role race plays in systems of power and thought in the field of French and Francophone Studies. We hope our series will foster conversations that combat racism and promote inclusion and equity in our classrooms and research.

 

About the series:
The recent death of George Floyd and the ensuing Black Lives Matter protests in the United States have resonated powerfully in France, which witnessed its own case of police brutality against Adamé Traroé, a young French-Malian man who died in police custody in 2016. These events have triggered difficult conversations in both countries about national identity, the memory of slavery, and notions of race. In France, these debates have led to a revaluation of France’s legacy of colonization, notably through a critical reappraisal of the ideologies that undergird traditional notions of French citizenship.

Given the urgency of such discussions, the members of the French Department, as both individuals and scholars, propose a public examination of the role race plays in systems of power and thought in our own field, in order to deepen classroom discussions and promote inclusion and equity in our courses. To this end, we have organized a fall virtual colloquium series featuring eminent French Studies scholars who will speak on topics ranging from “art and race” and “the illegibility of French anti-Blackness” to “racial dimensions of the notion of freedom” and “anti-racism campaigns in Paris.” We hope our series will foster conversations that illuminate the entrenched role of race and racism both in France and the US. Please join us for these conversations.

For more information, please contact:

ml104@wellesley.edu

jamie gass

K-12 School Choice and The Liberal Arts: The Student Fellows Lecture

Oct 29, 4:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

In the 2020 annual Freedom Project Student Fellows lecture, Jamie Gass, director of the Center for School Reform at the Boston-based think tank Pioneer Institute, will argue that school choice provides the best possibility for America’s K-12 schoolchildren to access the high-quality liberal arts curriculum found in excellent public, private, and parochial schools, as well as preparation for higher education. Gass will discuss a variety of school options, the legal and political barriers to greater choice, and the importance of time-tested academic content in primary and secondary education.

Please register in adavance

Jamie Gass is Pioneer Institute’s Director of the Center for School Reform. At Pioneer, he has framed, commissioned, and managed over 100 research papers and numerous policy events on K-12 education reform topics, including several with Pulitzer Prize-winning historians. Jamie has more than two decades of experience in public administration and education reform at the state, municipal, and school district levels. Previously, he worked at the Massachusetts Office of Educational Quality and Accountability as Senior Policy Analyst-Technical Writer and in the state budget office under two Massachusetts governors. In the 1990s, Jamie worked for the Dean of the Boston University School of Education/Boston University Management Team in its historic partnership with the Chelsea Public Schools. He has appeared on various Boston media outlets, as well as talk radio shows throughout the country. He has been quoted in Bloomberg/Businessweek, The Economist, Education Week, and The Boston Globe, and his op-eds are regularly published in New England newspapers, as well as in The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, The Hechinger Report, The Hill, The Daily Caller, The Federalist, Education Next, and City Journal. He’s won school reform awards in Massachusetts and Florida for his work on U.S. History/civic education, vocational-technical schools, and digital learning. Jamie speaks on academic standards, school choice options, and school accountability at events across the country.

Generously supported by:

The Freedom Project

Jay Turner

Charged: The History of Batteries and Prospects for a Clean Energy Future

A Knapp/Newhouse at Home Presentation by Professor Jay Turner
Oct 8, 2:45–4 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

From disposable AA batteries in remote controls to the lithium-ion batteries powering a new generation of electric cars, the history of batteries offers a window into the challenges of achieving a just and environmentally sustainable future. By focusing on the environmental history of a ubiquitous, but understudied, consumer product essential to a modern culture of mobility, this project will inform current debates and plans for a clean energy future. This presentation will feature commentary from Professor Erich Hatala Matthes (Director, Frost Center for the Environment; Associate Professor of Philosophy).

This event is free and open to the public. Pre-registration is required. Please click here to sign up.

Mary Kate McGowan

Silencing: On Various Kinds of Communicative Interference and Why They Matter

A Newhouse at Home Presentation by Mary Kate McGowan
Oct 29, 4–5:15 PM
Virtual
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

Lately, there has been quite a lot of discussion – both in academic philosophy and in the media - about silencing. Quite a few interesting, controversial, and even perplexing claims have been made. Pornography is alleged to silence women and the liberal climate on college campuses is alleged to silence conservative voices. These claims seem quite different. The latter seems to concern the unjust punishment or even prevention of speech, but the former does not. This suggests that silencing can manifest in a variety of ways. I argue that it does. The common element, I suggest, is communicative interference. When a person is silenced, that person’s intended (or in some cases potential) communication is thwarted in some important way. Since communication is a complex and multi-faceted process, it can go awry in many different ways. The different sorts of silencing on offer in this project correspond with these different ways that communication can be undermined.

In this project, I distinguish between various kinds of silencing and I offer an account of each. Through an exploration of real world cases (e.g., from law, the media, the classroom, and so on), I also demonstrate that these types of silencing are actualized and why they matter.

Following the presentation, Newhouse Center fellow Veronika Fuechtner (Associate Professor of German Studies, Dartmouth College) will offer commentary on Professor McGowan's research. 

This event will be hosted as a workshop-style presentation and is open only to the Wellesley College community. Pre-registration is required. Please click here to sign up. 

Image Credit:

Mary Kate McGowan

abstract collage

Wellesley College Theatre Showcase

Oct 14, 7 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

A virtual performance of original works featuring the combined forces of all fall Theatre Studies courses.

Fall courses offer Wellesley’s students of theatre—onstage and off—the ability to explore the power of writing plays, find authentic presence thru acting, realize envisioned worlds in set design, and comment on your world through the generation of comedy. Join Wellesley College Theatre for a virtual evening of short, original collaborative works in our third annual Fall Showcase.

Please register in advance.

Kellie Carter Jackson, Callie Crossley ’73, Liz Miranda ’02

Kellie Carter Jackson, Callie Crossley ’73, Liz Miranda ’02

Black Lives and Black Votes: Election 2020 and Beyond

Oct 7, 7 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

In this #WellesleyVotes conversation, GBH Boston host and commentator Callie Crossley ’73 will moderate a discussion with Liz Miranda ’02, Massachusetts State Representative, and Kellie Carter Jackson, Knafel Assistant Professor of Humanities and assistant professor of Africana studies. Their conversation will center on the evolution of the Black Lives Matter movement and how people of color—especially Black women and women of color—are mobilizing around the election to fight systemic racism and push for change.

Please register for this virtual event. The event will be live captioned.

image of Gail Cruise-Roberson, Lisette DeSouza, Kamilah Drummond-Forrester, LaShawnda Lindsay, Layli Maparyan

Advancing Racial Justice Through Research and Action

Oct 21, 1–2:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

The United States is in the midst of a long-overdue reckoning with systemic racial inequality. To move the needle on this issue, each of us needs to take it upon ourselves to understand structural racism, and — just as importantly — take action to dismantle the systems that keep it in place. During this program, panelists will discuss the ways they advance racial justice through their research and action work at the Wellesley Centers for Women. Panelists will also offer ways that participants can take action to advance racial justice in their lives and their communities.

This virtual program is part of the Social Change Dialogues series hosted by the Wellesley Centers for Women. The series is made possible with support from the Cowles/Sulzberger Fund, an endowed gift to the Centers. This program will be recorded and shared with those who cannot attend live.

Panelists

  • Gail Cruise-Roberson, Co-Director, National SEED Project, Wellesley Centers for Women
  • Lisette DeSouza, Ph.D., Associate Research Scientist, National Institute on Out-of-School Time, Wellesley Centers for Women
  • Kamilah Drummond-Forrester, M.A., CAGS, Director, Open Circle, Wellesley Centers for Women
  • LaShawnda Lindsay, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Wellesley Centers for Women
  • Moderator: Layli Maparyan, Ph.D., Katherine Stone Kaufmann & Executive Director, Wellesley Centers for Women; Professor of Africana Studies, Wellesley College 

This event is part of #WellesleyVotes. Please register in advance.

For more information, please contact:

wcw@wellesley.edu

images Karen Craddock, Sari Pekkala Kerr, Wendy Wagner Robeson, Layli Maparyan

COVID-19 and Gender Equality

Oct 14, 2:30–4 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Pandemics tend to have an outsize impact on women and families, beyond the immediate health risks. COVID-19 is no exception. During this panel, experts from the Wellesley Centers for Women will discuss the unique ways that COVID-19 is impacting women’s work-life balance, economic opportunity, and mental wellbeing.

This virtual program is part of the Social Change Dialogues series hosted by the Wellesley Centers for Women. The series is made possible with support from the Cowles/Sulzberger Fund, an endowed gift to the Centers. This program will be recorded and shared with those who cannot attend live. 

Panelists

  • Karen Craddock, Ph.D., Visiting Scholar, Wellesley Centers for Women
  • Sari Pekkala Kerr, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist and Economist, Wellesley Centers for Women
  • Wendy Wagner Robeson, Ed.D., Senior Research Scientist, Wellesley Centers for Women
  • Moderator: Layli Maparyan, Ph.D., Katherine Stone Kaufmann '67 Executive Director, Wellesley Centers for Women; Professor of Africana Studies, Wellesley College

This event is part of #WellesleyVotesPlease register in advance.

For more information, please contact:

wcw@wellesley.edu

Photo taken from a Zumba cruise

Fun, Fitness, Fiesta: Constructing Latinness in Zumba Fitness

A Knapp/Newhouse at Home Presentation by Petra Rivera-Rideau
Nov 19, 4–5:15 PM
Virtual
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

Fun, Fitness, Fiesta shows how Zumba Fitness brand centers a “Latinness” that draws from and informs a wider set of values and assumptions about Latinx people and cultures in the United States. More specifically, Zumba Fitness promotes a tropicalized Latinness that reinforces stereotypes of the exotic, foreign, Latin other. Fun, Fitness, Fiesta demonstrates how Zumba’s tropicalized Latinness reproduces racist stereotypes of Latinx populations, contradicting the company’s message about cultural tolerance and acceptance. I use an interdisciplinary approach that combines different sources including media coverage of Zumba, advertisements, products and videos produced by Zumba, and interviews that I conducted with Zumba instructors. Taken together, these sources tell a complex story about how Zumba represents and disseminates ideas about “Latin culture,” and how these representations are interpreted on the ground. I argue that it is critical to unpack the lessons, images, and ideas about Latinx cultures that circulate in the Zumba universe. Doing so unearths much deeper and entrenched understandings of the relationship between race, belonging, citizenship, and Latinidad.

This event will is open to all members of the Wellesley College community. Pre-registration is required. Please click here to sign up.

image of Cara Romero's photograph "The Last Indian Market"

Detail from The Last Indian Market by Cara Romero.

Virtual Artist Talk Series: Cara Romero

Sep 30, 3–4 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Join Dr. Carrie Cushman, Linda Wyatt Gruber ’66 Curatorial Fellow in Photography at the Davis Museum, for a virtual conversation with photographer Cara Romero to discuss her work, Last Indian Market.

Registration is required.

 

Davis Museum: Handmade Photography Today Virtual Artist Talk Series
In conjunction with the exhibition, Making, Not Taking: Portrait Photography in the 19th Century, the Davis Museum presents a series of virtual artist talks to explore contemporary iterations of nineteenth-century photographic processes. This fall, join us for conversations with Takashi Arai, Edie Bresler, Myra Greene, and Will Wilson.

Nikole Hannah-Jones

Nikole Hannah-Jones

Nikole Hannah-Jones: The Legacy of 1619 and Racial Justice Today

A conversation with Michael Jeffries
Sep 29, 6 PM
Online
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

Wellesley welcomes Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and MacArthur Fellow Nikole Hannah-Jones to speak about the legacy of slavery in the United States and the need for racial justice today. Her lecture, to be delivered remotely, will serve as both the Betsy Wood Knapp ’64 Lecture in the Social Sciences and the Wilson Lecture, two of the College’s premier academic lectures.

Following an introduction by President Paula A. Johnson, Hannah-Jones will join Michael Jeffries, dean of academic affairs, for a moderated discussion. This event is part of #WellesleyVotes. 

Free and open to Wellesley College students, faculty, and staff only. Please pre-register for the event.

 

Generously supported by:

This event is generously supported by the Knapp Social Science Center and the Wilson Lectures Fund supported by Carolyn Ann Wilson, Class of 1910.

black and white photo of a Native American woman posing

Virtual Artist Talk Series: Will Wilson

Dec 10, 5–6:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Elena Creef, Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Wellesley College, in conversation with photographer Will Wilson, who reinscribes the varied identities, values, and customs of the contemporary Native American community in tintypes.

Registration is required.

 

Davis Museum: Handmade Photography Today Virtual Artist Talk Series
In conjunction with the exhibition, Making, Not Taking: Portrait Photography in the 19th Century, the Davis Museum presents a series of virtual artist talks to explore contemporary iterations of nineteenth-century photographic processes. This fall, join us for conversations with Takashi Arai, Edie Bresler, Myra Greene, and Will Wilson. The series is generously sponsored by the Bern Schwartz Family Foundation.

Kelly Dittmar

A Seat at the Table: Women Voters in Trump’s America

Sep 17, 5:30–6:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

A discussion with Kelly Dittmar, associate professor of political science at Rutgers University and director of research at the Center for Women and Politics. Zoom attendance link.

This event is part of the Wellesley College 2020 Election Speaker Series.

Generously supported by:

the political science department, the Project on Public Leadership & Action, Wellesley in Washington, the Slater International Center, and the Wellesley College Alumni Association.

Lynn Vavreck and Michel Tesler

The 2016 and 2020 Elections and the Battle for the Meaning of America

Oct 6, 5:30–6:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

A talk by Lynn Vavreck, professor of political science at UCLA and consultant to the Joe Biden campaign, and Michel Tesler, professor of political science at UC Irvine.

Zoom attendance link.

This event is part of the Wellesley College 2020 Election Speaker Series.

For more information, please contact:

Maneesh Arora, maneesh.arora@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the political science department, the Project on Public Leadership & Action, Wellesley in Washington, the Slater International Center, and the Wellesley College Alumni Association

Sono Shah

Social Media, the Black Lives Matter Movement, and the 2020 Election

Sep 30, 5:30–6:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

A talk by Sono Shah, Computational Social Scientist at Pew Research Center. Zoom attendance link.

This event is part of the Wellesley College 2020 Election Speaker Series.

For more information, please contact:

Maneesh Arora, maneesh.arora@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the political science department, the Project on Public Leadership & Action, Wellesley in Washington, the Slater International Center, and the Wellesley College Alumni Association.

Matt Barreto

Sleeping Giants? Latinx Voters and the 2020 Election

Sep 23, 5:30–6:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

A talk by Matt Barreto, professor of political science and Chicana/o studies at UCLA and consultant for the Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden presidential campaigns.

Zoom attendance link.

This event is part of the Wellesley College 2020 Election Speaker Series.

 

For more information, please contact:

Maneesh Arora, maneesh.arora@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the political science department, the Project on Public Leadership & Action, Wellesley in Washington, the Slater International Center, and the Wellesley College Alumni Association

Tyler Stovall

Tyler Stovall: White France? Freedom and Race in the Modern Republic

Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies
Nov 12, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

The French Department welcomes Tyler Stovall, dean, Fordham University’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, to deliver a lecture, White France? Freedom and Race in the Modern Republic, as part of a virtual colloquia series Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies.

Please register via Zoom.

This series features eminent scholars examining the role race plays in systems of power and thought in the field of French and Francophone Studies. We hope our series will foster conversations that combat racism and promote inclusion and equity in our classrooms and research.

 

About the series:
The recent death of George Floyd and the ensuing Black Lives Matter protests in the United States have resonated powerfully in France, which witnessed its own case of police brutality against Adamé Traroé, a young French-Malian man who died in police custody in 2016. These events have triggered difficult conversations in both countries about national identity, the memory of slavery, and notions of race. In France, these debates have led to a revaluation of France’s legacy of colonization, notably through a critical reappraisal of the ideologies that undergird traditional notions of French citizenship.

Given the urgency of such discussions, the members of the French Department, as both individuals and scholars, propose a public examination of the role race plays in systems of power and thought in our own field, in order to deepen classroom discussions and promote inclusion and equity in our courses. To this end, we have organized a fall virtual colloquium series featuring eminent French Studies scholars who will speak on topics ranging from “art and race” and “the illegibility of French anti-Blackness” to “racial dimensions of the notion of freedom” and “anti-racism campaigns in Paris.” We hope our series will foster conversations that illuminate the entrenched role of race and racism both in France and the US. Please join us for these conversations.

For more information, please contact:

ml104@wellesley.edu

Dorian Bell

Dorian Bell: Co-optations of Antiracism by the French and American Right

Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies
Nov 5, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

The French Department welcomes Dorian Bell, associate professor of literature and Jewish studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, to deliver a lecture, The ‘Real’ Racists: Co-optations of Antiracism by the French and American Right, as part of a virtual colloquia series Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies.

Please register via Zoom.

This series features eminent scholars examining the role race plays in systems of power and thought in the field of French and Francophone Studies. We hope our series will foster conversations that combat racism and promote inclusion and equity in our classrooms and research.

 

About the series:
The recent death of George Floyd and the ensuing Black Lives Matter protests in the United States have resonated powerfully in France, which witnessed its own case of police brutality against Adamé Traroé, a young French-Malian man who died in police custody in 2016. These events have triggered difficult conversations in both countries about national identity, the memory of slavery, and notions of race. In France, these debates have led to a revaluation of France’s legacy of colonization, notably through a critical reappraisal of the ideologies that undergird traditional notions of French citizenship.

Given the urgency of such discussions, the members of the French Department, as both individuals and scholars, propose a public examination of the role race plays in systems of power and thought in our own field, in order to deepen classroom discussions and promote inclusion and equity in our courses. To this end, we have organized a fall virtual colloquium series featuring eminent French Studies scholars who will speak on topics ranging from “art and race” and “the illegibility of French anti-Blackness” to “racial dimensions of the notion of freedom” and “anti-racism campaigns in Paris.” We hope our series will foster conversations that illuminate the entrenched role of race and racism both in France and the US. Please join us for these conversations.

For more information, please contact:

ml104@wellesley.edu

Anne Lafont

Anne Lafont: Race and Art in French Enlightenment

Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies
Sep 30, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

The French Department welcomes Anne Lafont, directrice d’études, EHESS, to deliver a lecture, Art and Race in French Enlightenment, as part of a virtual colloquia series Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies.

This disucssion will be delivered in French, English subtitles will be provided. Please register via Zoom.

This series features eminent scholars examining the role race plays in systems of power and thought in the field of French and Francophone Studies. We hope our series will foster conversations that combat racism and promote inclusion and equity in our classrooms and research.

 

About the series:
The recent death of George Floyd and the ensuing Black Lives Matter protests in the United States have resonated powerfully in France, which witnessed its own case of police brutality against Adamé Traroé, a young French-Malian man who died in police custody in 2016. These events have triggered difficult conversations in both countries about national identity, the memory of slavery, and notions of race. In France, these debates have led to a revaluation of France’s legacy of colonization, notably through a critical reappraisal of the ideologies that undergird traditional notions of French citizenship.

Given the urgency of such discussions, the members of the French Department, as both individuals and scholars, propose a public examination of the role race plays in systems of power and thought in our own field, in order to deepen classroom discussions and promote inclusion and equity in our courses. To this end, we have organized a fall virtual colloquium series featuring eminent French Studies scholars who will speak on topics ranging from “art and race” and “the illegibility of French anti-Blackness” to “racial dimensions of the notion of freedom” and “anti-racism campaigns in Paris.” We hope our series will foster conversations that illuminate the entrenched role of race and racism both in France and the US. Please join us for these conversations.

Image Credit:

ml104@wellesley.edu

Alice L. Conklin

Alice L. Conklin: Race Talk: Antiracism at UNESCO in Postwar Paris 1948–1965

Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies
Sep 24, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

The French Department welcomes Alice L. Conklin, Distinguished Professor of History, Ohio State University, to deliver a lecture, Race Talk: Antiracism at UNESCO in Postwar Paris 1948-1965, as part of a virtual colloquia series Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies.

Please register via Zoom.

This series features eminent scholars examining the role race plays in systems of power and thought in the field of French and Francophone Studies. We hope our series will foster conversations that combat racism and promote inclusion and equity in our classrooms and research.

 

About the series:
The recent death of George Floyd and the ensuing Black Lives Matter protests in the United States have resonated powerfully in France, which witnessed its own case of police brutality against Adamé Traroé, a young French-Malian man who died in police custody in 2016. These events have triggered difficult conversations in both countries about national identity, the memory of slavery, and notions of race. In France, these debates have led to a revaluation of France’s legacy of colonization, notably through a critical reappraisal of the ideologies that undergird traditional notions of French citizenship.

Given the urgency of such discussions, the members of the French Department, as both individuals and scholars, propose a public examination of the role race plays in systems of power and thought in our own field, in order to deepen classroom discussions and promote inclusion and equity in our courses. To this end, we have organized a fall virtual colloquium series featuring eminent French Studies scholars who will speak on topics ranging from “art and race” and “the illegibility of French anti-Blackness” to “racial dimensions of the notion of freedom” and “anti-racism campaigns in Paris.” We hope our series will foster conversations that illuminate the entrenched role of race and racism both in France and the US. Please join us for these conversations.

For more information, please contact:

ml104@wellesley.edu

Crystal Fleming

Crystal Fleming ’04: On the Illegibility of French Antiblackness

Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies
Nov 17, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

The French Department welcomes Crystal Fleming ’04, professor of sociology, Stony Brook University, to deliver a lecture, On the Illegibility of French Antiblackness: Notes from an African American Critic, as part of a virtual colloquia series Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies.

This talk employs a critical race framework to explore historical and present-day dynamics of antiblackness in France. Reflecting on her own experiences as an African American researcher studying French racism and commemorations of slavery in the Paris region, the author considers the discursive practices of denial and minimization that continue to obfuscate French antiblackness. The author argues that despite rising attention to the legacies of slavery and a massive resurgence of mobilizations focusing on the experiences and suffering of Black people, the denial of systemic racism and French antiblackness remains hegemonic. Obscuring, erasing, justifying and trivializing antiblack racism are common features of French life—with devastating consequences for people of African descent.

Please register via Zoom.

 

About the series:
This series features eminent scholars examining the role race plays in systems of power and thought in the field of French and Francophone Studies. We hope our series will foster conversations that combat racism and promote inclusion and equity in our classrooms and research.

The recent death of George Floyd and the ensuing Black Lives Matter protests in the United States have resonated powerfully in France, which witnessed its own case of police brutality against Adamé Traroé, a young French-Malian man who died in police custody in 2016. These events have triggered difficult conversations in both countries about national identity, the memory of slavery, and notions of race. In France, these debates have led to a revaluation of France’s legacy of colonization, notably through a critical reappraisal of the ideologies that undergird traditional notions of French citizenship.

Given the urgency of such discussions, the members of the French Department, as both individuals and scholars, propose a public examination of the role race plays in systems of power and thought in our own field, in order to deepen classroom discussions and promote inclusion and equity in our courses. To this end, we have organized a fall virtual colloquium series featuring eminent French Studies scholars who will speak on topics ranging from “art and race” and “the illegibility of French anti-Blackness” to “racial dimensions of the notion of freedom” and “anti-racism campaigns in Paris.” We hope our series will foster conversations that illuminate the entrenched role of race and racism both in France and the U.S. Please join us for these conversations.

For more information, please contact:

ml104@wellesley.edu

Marlene L. Daut

Marlene L. Daut: Haiti: History and Denial

Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies
Sep 17, 2:30–3:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

The French Department welcomes Marlene L. Daut, professor of African diaspora studies, University of Virginia, to deliver a lecture, Haiti: History and Denial, as part of a virtual colloquia series Addressing Racism and Anti-Blackness in French and Francophone Studies. This series features eminent scholars examining the role race plays in systems of power and thought in the field of French and Francophone Studies. We hope our series will foster conversations that combat racism and promote inclusion and equity in our classrooms and research.

This discussion will be delivered in English. Please register via Zoom.

 

About the series:
The recent death of George Floyd and the ensuing Black Lives Matter protests in the United States have resonated powerfully in France, which witnessed its own case of police brutality against Adamé Traroé, a young French-Malian man who died in police custody in 2016. These events have triggered difficult conversations in both countries about national identity, the memory of slavery, and notions of race. In France, these debates have led to a revaluation of France’s legacy of colonization, notably through a critical reappraisal of the ideologies that undergird traditional notions of French citizenship.

Given the urgency of such discussions, the members of the French Department, as both individuals and scholars, propose a public examination of the role race plays in systems of power and thought in our own field, in order to deepen classroom discussions and promote inclusion and equity in our courses. To this end, we have organized a fall virtual colloquium series featuring eminent French Studies scholars who will speak on topics ranging from “art and race” and “the illegibility of French anti-Blackness” to “racial dimensions of the notion of freedom” and “anti-racism campaigns in Paris.” We hope our series will foster conversations that illuminate the entrenched role of race and racism both in France and the US. Please join us for these conversations.

For more information, please contact:

ml104@wellesley.edu

Camara Jones ’76, President Johnson, Ophelia Dahl DS ’94

From left: Camara Jones ’76, President Johnson, and Ophelia Dahl DS ’94.

Racial and Global Disparities in COVID-19

Sep 8, 7 PM
Online
Free and open to the public

Ophelia Dahl DS ’94, co-founder of Partners In Healthand Camara Jones ’76, senior fellow at the Satcher Health Leadership Institute and Cardiovascular Research Institute at Morehouse School of Medicinejoin President Paula A. Johnson in a conversation to discuss the prevalence and dire effects of racial and other global health disparities during this pandemic. This event is part of #WellesleyVotes. 

This event has ended. Please visit our YouTube channel to view the recording.

About the Panelists

Ophelia Dahl co-founded Partners In Health (PIH), a global health non-profit dedicated to delivering high-quality care to the poor. PIH, which began in Haiti’s rural Central Plateau, now serves millions of patients in ten countries on four continents around the world. PIH’s community-based model has helped to redefine what’s possible in health care delivery in settings of poverty, proving that HIV, multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, and other diseases that stalk the poor can be effectively treated in communities from Peru to Rwanda to West Africa. Ms. Dahl led PIH as executive director for 16 years, and now chairs its Board of Directors. She continues to write, teach, and speak about the health and rights of the poor, moral imagination, and accompaniment.

Ms. Dahl also helps to lead the Roald Dahl Literary Estate, which manages the works of her late father, the writer Roald Dahl. She is a director’s fellow at the MIT Media Lab, and a trustee of Wellesley College, her alma mater. Ms. Dahl is a recipient of the Union Theological Seminary’s Union Medal and, together with her PIH colleagues, the Hilton Humanitarian prize. She lives in Cambridge with her family.

Camara Phyllis Jones, MD, MPH, PhD is a family physician, epidemiologist, and past president of the American Public Health Association, whose work focuses on naming, measuring, and addressing the impacts of racism on the health and well-being of the nation. Valued for her creativity and intellectual agility, she seeks to broaden the national health debate to include not only universal access to high quality health care, but also attention to the social determinants of health (including poverty) and the social determinants of equity (including racism). Her allegories on "race" and racism illuminate topics that are otherwise difficult for many Americans to understand or discuss.

Dr. Jones recently completed tenure as the 2019-2020 Evelyn Green Davis Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University.

Past roles include assistant professor at the Harvard School of Public Health (1994 to 2000); medical officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2000 to 2014); senior fellow at the Morehouse School of Medicine (2014 to present); and president of the American Public Health Association (2015 to 2016). She is also an adjunct professor at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University (2004 to present) and an adjunct associate professor at the Morehouse School of Medicine (2003 to present).

Generously supported by:

This event is generously supported by the Office of the President.

Newhouse Placeholder

Newhouse Placeholder

Sep 23
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Newhouse Placeholder

Newhouse Placeholder

Newhouse Placeholder

Sep 13
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Newhouse Placeholder

Newhouse Placeholder

Newhouse Placeholder

Sep 12
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Newhouse Placeholder

Place Holder

Newhouse Placeholder

Sep 12
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Newhouse Placeholder

photo collage of a person's face

Virtual Artist Talk Series: Myra Greene

Nov 12, 5–6:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Nikki Greene, Assistant Professor of Art at Wellesley College, in conversation with photographer Myra Greene, who uses ambrotypes to challenge visual legacies of ethnographic classification in detailed explorations of her own skin color and facial features.

Registration is required.

 

Davis Museum: Handmade Photography Today Virtual Artist Talk Series
In conjunction with the exhibition, Making, Not Taking: Portrait Photography in the 19th Century, the Davis Museum presents a series of virtual artist talks to explore contemporary iterations of nineteenth-century photographic processes. This fall, join us for conversations with Takashi Arai, Edie Bresler, Myra Greene, and Will Wilson. The series is generously sponsored by the Bern Schwartz Family Foundation.

abstract photography pattern

Virtual Artist Talk Series: Takashi Arai

Sep 17, 5–6:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Join Carrie Cushman, Linda Wyatt Gruber ‘66 Curatorial Fellow in Photography at the Davis Museum, in conversation with photographer Takashi Arai, who uses daguerreotypes to explore the relationship between nuclear exposure, monuments, and historical memory in Japan.

Registration is required.

 

Davis Museum: Handmade Photography Today Virtual Artist Talk Series
In conjunction with the exhibition, Making, Not Taking: Portrait Photography in the 19th Century, the Davis Museum presents a series of virtual artist talks to explore contemporary iterations of nineteenth-century photographic processes. This fall, join us for conversations with Takashi Arai, Edie Bresler, Myra Greene, and Will Wilson. The series is generously sponsored by the Bern Schwartz Family Foundation.

Protestors march in Russia.

Protestors march in Russia’s Far East.

Russia NOW: The Current State of the Former Soviet Union

Russian Area Studies Panel
Sep 15, 8 PM
Virtual
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only
The Russian Area Studies Program annual panel on the former Soviet Union.
 
Russia today is awash in crises and contradictions. It ranks fourth in global coronavirus cases, having recently surged to over a million cases; at the same time its reported death toll is suspiciously low. The recent poisoning of the Kremlin’s only significant political opponent, Aleksei Navalny, has once again brought on the wrath of European leaders. Massive summertime protests in the country’s far east shocked the Kremlin, and now the recent and current vast and sustained protests in Belarus—Russia’s close neighbor—against its (likely fraudulently) reelected thuggish longtime president, Alexander Lukashenko, have made Russian authorities watchful, while President Putin has vowed public support for Belarusian dictator and promised to ship him Russia’s newly minted coronavirus vaccine. Primal fears of widespread popular unrest spreading to Russia are paramount despite recent attempts to inspire solidarity in the massive summertime Victory Parade to mark the 75th anniversary of the Soviet defeat of Nazi Germany. And Siberia and Russia’s arctic have fallen victim to dramatic and unprecedented levels of heat and destruction due to global warming.
 
Wellesley College’s Russia experts will shed light on the country that many consider our foremost geopolitical adversary.
 
Faculty Speakers: Thomas Hodge (Russian), Nina Tumarkin (History), Christiana Botticello (Political Science)
Moderator: Adam Weiner (Russian)
 

This live event is open to the Wellesley College community only, please register in advance. A recording of the event will be available on our Russian Area Studies webpage following the live event.

 

For more information, please contact:

ksangoja@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Kathryn Wasserman Davis ’28 Fund.

Image Credit:

Reuters/E. Pereverzev

Crystal Fleming

How To Be Less Stupid About Race: A Conversation With Crystal Fleming ’04

Sep 15, 6–7:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Please join us for How to Be Less Stupid About Race: A Conversation with Crystal Fleming ’04. Dr. Crystal Fleming is an internationally recognized expert on racism and anti-racism. She is currently a professor of Sociology and Africana Studies at SUNY Stony Brook. She earned her Ph.D. and a master’s degree in Sociology from Harvard University and graduated with honors in Sociology and French from Wellesley College. She will join us to discuss her critically acclaimed book How to Be Less Stupid About Race, its continued relevance in the current political and social climate, and how we can move forward. Known for her frank talk and insouciant humor, Dr. Fleming is an incredibly engaging speaker, and we cannot wait to welcome her (virtually) to campus.

Please register in advance.

Hosted by the Office of Intercultural Education. The event is co-sponsored by the Student Life, The Center for the Environment, Botanic Gardens, and The Paulson Initiative.

For more information, please contact:

tbarbalh@wellesley.edu

image of a voting ballot box

Film Screening and Discussion of “Rigged: The Voter Suppression Playbook”

Sep 9, 5:30–6:45 PM
Virtual
Ticket information appears below

Rigged film screening and panel featuring Barbara Friedman ’75, senior producer of Rigged; Jocelyn Benson ’99, Michigan Secretary of State; and Gilda Daniels, lead counsel at Advancement Project, law professor University of Baltimore.

This event is part of the Wellesley College 2020 Election Speaker Series. Please register in advance.

For more information, please contact:

Maneesh Arora, maneesh.arora@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the political science department, the Project on Public Leadership & Action, Wellesley in Washington, the Slater International Center, and the Wellesley College Alumni Association.

students protesting the immigration executive order

Town Hall Meeting: Understanding the Executive Order

A Conversation with an Immigration Attorney
Apr 12, 2017, 5 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

A facilitated town hall with a leading immigration attorney designed to help students, staff, and faculty understand how to navigate the new executive orders.

Generously supported by:

the Office of the President, the Working Group on Immigration Policy, and Slater International Center.

A group of 5 people sitting in a gallery at the Davis Museum.

*Canceled* Mindful Meditation

Feb 19, Mar 18, Apr 15, May 20
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Surround yourself with art, and experience present-moment awareness in this 30 minute meditation session. Guided by Kotatsu John Bailes Roshi, the College’s Buddhist chaplain. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Davis’s permanent collections and special exhibitions and includes a guided meditation.

Meet in the Davis Lobby at 12:30 p.m.

  • February 19
  • March 18 *canceled*
  • April 15 *canceled*
  • May 20 *canceled*

Co-sponsored by the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

image of a porcelain bowl with blue illustration on it

Bowl: Grape and Squirrel Design, Qing dynasty, Kangxi period, early 18th century.

*Cancled* Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month Tour

Drop-in Public Tour
May 2, 2 PM
Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

*This event is canceled due to the COVID-19 outbeak.*

Generously supported by:

the Elizabeth Bein Keto ’48 Endowed Memorial Art Fund.

Image Credit:

Anonymous gift Object No.: 2002.0.12

collage of a renaissance painting of a woman dressed in fancy clothes. one of the collaged images is blurred out

*Canceled* Wellesley Repertory Theatre Presents: “The Last Wife”

By Kate Hennig, Directed by Kelly Galvin
Jun 3–Jun 28
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Ticket information appears below

*This event is canceled due to the COVID-19 outbeak.*

A contemporary retelling of the compelling relationship between Katherine Parr and Henry VIII, “The Last Wife” is a funny, powerful examination of patriarchy, sexual politics, and women’s rights. Kate Parr is smart, confident, and passionate, a rising star in a world of intense competition. But her obligatory marriage to Henry is rife with the threat of violence and lure of deceit; her secret liaisons with Thom, her husband’s former brother-in-law, could send her to an early grave; and her devotion to the education and equal rights of Henry’s daughters is putting an even bigger strain on her marriage. Will Kate risk her life to gain authority in both her relationship and her political career? Which love will she be led to if she follows her heart? And what kind of future will there be for her children if she makes a crucial mistake?

Ticket information:

Show times:

  • Thursdays | 7pm
  • Fridays | 7 pm
  • Saturdays | 2 pm, 7 pm
  • Sundays | 2 pm
students holding peace signs at a immigration rally

*Postponed* Supporting our Undocumented, DACA, and TPS Students

A Workshop with Dr. Lorgia Garcia Peña
Apr 9, 12:45 PM
Alumnae Hall Ballroom
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, this even has been postponed.*

A workshop for Wellesley faculty and staff with Dr. Lorgia Garcia Peña about how to best support undocumented, DACA, and TPS studentsis. National and regional resources will be shared.

Dr. Lorgia Garcia Peña is a professor of Latinx Studies at Harvard University and cofounder of Freedom University in Georgia. She specializes in identity and migration studies and is the award winning author of The Borders of Dominicanidad: Race, Nations and Archives of Contradictions, a study of the impact of stories—historical and fictional—on the national and racial identity of a people.

Please RSVP.

For more information, please contact:

maliceaw@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

The President's Office, the Immigration Working Group, the Office of Intercultural Education, and the CLCLE.

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble

*Canceled* Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble

Kera Washington, Director
May 2, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble will perform the folkloric music and dance of Africa, as it exists today throughout Africa and the African Diaspora, particularly in Haiti, Ghana, Zimbabwe, and Brazil.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Wellesley College BlueJazz performing

Wellesley College BlueJazz

*Canceled*Wellesley BlueJazz Big Band Spring Concert: “Have you Heard?”

Cercie Miller, Director
May 1, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Get on the jazz train this spring, with music of Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and more! The Wellesley College Big Band performs new and classic jazz repertoire with a fresh take, featuring dynamic ensemble passages, big band shouts, and spirited improvisations by soloists. Celebrate jazz this spring with Wellesley BlueJazz, directed by Cercie Miller.

 
For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Wellesley College BlueJazz Ensemble performing

Wellesley College BlueJazz Ensemble

*Canceled* Wellesley BlueJazz Combos Concert: No Walls, No Borders

Apr 24, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Join us for a lively evening as our wonderful instrumentalists and vocalists create the interplay between group and individual expression, weaving in musical influences from around the world, in the best of small ensemble jazz.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Wellesley College Collegium Musicum performance

Wellesley College Collegium Musicum

*Canceled* Collegium Musicum (Early Music Ensemble)

Andrew Arceci, Director
Apr 14, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

The Collegium Musicum is an ensemble of singers and instrumentalists open to Wellesley College students, faculty, staff, and the local community. The Collegium specializes in the performance of Western music from the Middle Ages to the early 19th century. The Collegium is often joined by faculty and outside guest artists who enrich the ensemble for special projects. 

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Place Holder

Brandeis Wellesley Orchestra

*Canceled* The Baum Memorial Concert

Lisa Graham, Conductor
Apr 4, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

For this concert, Wellesley College Choir is joined by Rutgers University Glee Club, Patrick Gardner, Conductor. The highly acclaimed Choral program at Wellesley allows students to experience the exhilaration and joy of performing the great choral repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. National and international tours have led them to perform in venues such as the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., La Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal, and the Mezquita in Cordoba, Spain.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Galen Stone Tower

*Canceled* Change Ringing Open Tower

Margaret Angelini, Director
May 2, 2–4 PM
Galen Stone Tower
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

If you’ve ever wanted to play the bells, here’s your chance! The students lead all visitors in playing simple melodies on the college carillon. Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the tradition of bell ringing, which has continued since the carillon was first installed in 1931. Listen from the academic quad or from Founders 305.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Wellesley College Chamber Music Society performance

Wellesley College Chamber Music Society

*Canceled* Chamber Music Society

David Russell and Jenny Tang, Directors
Apr 26, Apr 30, May 3, May 5, May 6
Various locations
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Founded in 1958, The Chamber Music Society of Wellesley College provides an opportunity for instrumentalists and vocalists to prepare and perform works for small ensembles. Each chamber group receives weekly coaching from a member of the Wellesley College Music Department, and performs at one of several concerts held at the end of each semester.

Chamber Music Marathon: Sunday, April 26, 12 p.m. | Anderson Forum, Lulu

CMS #1: Thursday, April 30, 7 p.m. | Sargent Salon (PNW-101)

CMS #2: Sunday, May 3, 2 p.m. | Jewett Auditorium

CMS #3: Tuesday, May 5, 7 p.m. | Jewett Auditorium

CMS #4: Wednesday, May 6, 7 p.m. | Sargent Salon (PNW-101)

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Brandeis Wellesley Orchestra performing a concert

Brandeis Wellesley Orchestra

*Canceled* Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra Spring Concert: Catch a Rising Star!

Neal Hampton, Conductor
Apr 25, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Catch a Rising Star! Features the Afro American Symphony by William Grant-Still and performances by the winners of the 2019 Concerto Competition.

Program includes:

Mozart Bella Mia Fiamma; Tiffany Sharma ’20, soprano

Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto Mvt 1; Hannah Ryu ’23, violin

William Grant-Still, Afro American Symphony

The Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra is composed of students, faculty, staff, and associates of Wellesley College, Brandeis University and Babson College. Uniting the standards of excellence associated with Wellesley and Brandeis, the orchestra brings inspiring performances of the great orchestral literature—past and present—to a new generation of musicians and audiences.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Wellesley College Choral Program singing

Wellesley College Choral Program

*Canceled* Skylark Ensemble presents Sub Rosa: Secrets Revealed

Special Event presented by and with the Wellesley College Choral Program, Lisa Graham, Conductor
Apr 23, 7 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Ticket information appears below

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

What might happen if Robert Langdon, acclaimed professor of Symbology at Harvard University–and fictional hero of Dan Brown’s best-selling novels, including The Da Vinci Code–were enlisted to explore hidden symbols, secret codes, and long-forgotten historical connections buried in manuscripts of choral music over the centuries? Join Skylark to find out.

Featuring video introductions by author Dan Brown and stunning new music by Gregory W. Brown.

Skylark strives to set the standard for innovative and engaging programs that re-define the choral experience for audiences and singers alike. Artistic Director Matthew Guard’s well-researched and creative programs have been described as “engrossing” (WQXR New York) and “original, stimulating, and beautiful” (BBC Radio 3). Often incorporating extensive research to explore connections to history, literature, art, and other disciplines, Skylark's programs engage the audience in new ways, always trying to provide the appropriate context for pieces to have an authentic emotional impact. The sampling of past programs below, including links to full-color program booklets–artfully designed by Cory Klose–gives you a window into the unique experience of attending a Skylark concert.

Please reserve tickets. Free admission with Wellesley I.D.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Music Department

Chucho Valdes

Chucho Valdés

*Canceled* Chucho Valdés: A Legend!

Apr 18, 7:30 PM
Alumnae Hall Ballroom
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

The Music Department is honored to welcome the legendary Chucho Valdés for a solo performance at Wellesley College. The Cuban pianist, composer, and arranger is the most influential figure in modern Afro-Cuban jazz. He is the winner of six GRAMMY Awards and four Latin GRAMMY Awards. Valdés received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences and was inducted in the Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2018. Born in a family of musicians in Quivicán, Havana province, Cuba, Dionisio Jesús “Chucho” Valdés Rodríguez, has distilled elements of the Afro-Cuban music tradition, jazz, classical music, rock, and more, into an organic, personal style that has a truly distinct style and substance.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Marjorie Copland Baum Fund, and the Florence Jeup Ford ’22, Mary M. Crawford ’22, and Virginia Ford ’48 Artist in Residence Endowment Fund.

Image Credit:

Carol Friedman

Galen Stone Tower

*Canceled* Spring Recital and Open Tower

Margaret Angelini, Director
Apr 4, 2–4 PM
Galen Stone Tower
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

Guest Carillonneurs will perform on the Wellesley College carillon. The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the tradition of bell ringing, which has continued since the carillon was first installed in 1931. All Carillon events are held at Galen Stone Tower. Listen from the academic quad or from Founders 305.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

photoshopped image a starry night sky

*Canceled* Wellesley College Theatre Presents: Silent Sky

By Lauren Gunderson, Directed by Marta Rainer
Apr 23–Apr 26
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Ticket information appears below

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

When Henrietta Leavitt begins work at the Harvard Observatory in the early 1900s, she isn’t allowed to touch a telescope or express an original idea. Instead, she joins a group of women “computers,” charting the stars for a renowned astronomer who calculates projects in “girl hours” and has no time for the women’s probing theories. As Henrietta, in her free time, attempts to measure the light and distance of stars, she must also take measure of her life on Earth, trying to balance her dedication to science with family obligations and the possibility of love. The true story of 19th-century astronomer Henrietta Leavitt explores a woman’s place in society during a time of significant scientific discoveries, when women’s ideas were dismissed until men claimed credit for them. Social progress, like scientific progress, can be hard to see when one is trapped among earthly complications; Henrietta Leavitt and her female peers believed in both, and their dedication changed the way we understand both the heavens and Earth.

Show times:

  • Thursday, April 23 | 7pm
  • Friday, April 24 | 7 pm
  • Saturday, April 25 | 2 pm, 7 pm
  • Sunday, April 26 | 2 pm

Ticket Information:

  • $15 General Admission, $10 for Seniors and Students 
  • Free for BOW and MIT students
  • Pay What You Will on Thursday, April 23
image of a Tina D'Elia looking at the camera and wearing a blue sweatshirt with the words "New York" on it.

Tina D'Elia

*Canceled* Wellesley College Theatre Presents: Overlooked Latinas

Written and performed by Tina D'Elia
Apr 6, 7 PM
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

This award-winning one-woman show is a live telenovela celebrating queer culture, friendship and Latinx history.

Generously supported by:

the CLCE, The Spanish Department, the Office of Intercultural Education, and the Latinx Advisor's Office

students looking at photographs taped to a wall

The 2020 Senior and Thesis Art Exhibition

May 9–May 31
N/a
Free and open to the public

As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event will be moved online. Please check back for details.

Celebrate the work of graduating seniors at the 2019–20 Senior and Thesis Exhibition! Featuring thesis projects and artwork by advanced senior students in studio art, media arts and sciences, and cinema and media studies, among others, this exhibition showcases the range of skills and techniques mastered by Wellesley art students, including painting, photography, video, installation, and more.

For more information, please contact:

Samara Pearlstein, spearls2@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Art Department.

image of Christina Yu Yu smiling at the camera

Christina Yu Yu

It All Started with ARTH 100 *Canceled*

The 2019-20 Art History Club Alumnae Speaker: Christina Yu Yu ’02, Matsutaro Shoriki Chair, Art of Asia, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Mar 30, 5:30 PM
Jewett Arts Center 450
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been canceled.*

This talk, the fifth in an annual series, brings an alumna of the Art Department to campus to meet with art history club students and speak about her professional and personal trajectory after Wellesley. Please bring your questions! A reception will follow in the Jewett Sculpture Court.

Christina Yu Yu ’02 is the Matsutaro Shoriki Chair of the Art of Asia Department at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Prior to her position at the MFA, she served as director of the University of Southern California Pacific Asia Museum, where she revolutionized the museum’s image, programs, and exhibitions. She will speak about her professional journey in museum work and the role Wellesley has played in it, as well as discuss some of the new challenges facing museums today.

For more information, please contact:

Diane Schrenzel ’20, Art History Club president, dschrenz@wellesley.edu.

portrait of Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum

Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum

The Betsy Wood Knapp ’64 Lecture *Postponed*

A Conversation About Race with Beverly Daniel Tatum
Apr 14, 4 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

*As a result of the the COVID-19 outbreak, this event has been postponed.*

How do we talk about race on campuses that have become increasingly diverse and that seek to promote equity and a sense of belonging? Join Beverly Daniel Tatum, author of Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race and president emerita of Spelman College, and Megan Núñez, dean of faculty affairs at Wellesley, for a candid conversation about racial relations in this country, and learn ways to facilitate necessary conversations about race and inclusion among young people.

For more information, please contact:

kssc@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Office of the President, the PLTC, the Knapp Social Science Center, the Department of Education, the HHMI-funded Inclusive Excellence grant and the ER&D Inclusive Excellence grant.

black and white illustration of abstract shapes and bodies

barbones (detail), Cesar Gabler, ink on paper.

Toro Herrera: An Exhibition by César Gabler

Mar 13–Apr 20
Jewett Art Gallery
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please note: As a precaution against the spread of COVID-19, the opening event has been canceled and the exhibition is open for Wellesley College campus community only.*

Chilean artist César Gabler exhibits new drawings in the Jewett Art Gallery at Wellesley College, including an installation drawn on-site over the course of a week. Gabler’s imagery makes references both allusive and explicit to social, political, and philosophical themes while referencing the visual languages of art history, illustration, and more.

Gallery hours: Mon–Fri, 10 am–4 pm; Sat–Sun, 12–4 pm.

For more information, please contact:

Samara Pearlstein, spearls2@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Art Department.

black and white archive photo of Wellesley students marching in a 1915 suffrage parade

Wellesley students marching in a 1915 suffrage parade

The Wellesley-Deerfield Symposium *Canceled*

From Suffrage to Stonewall: The Visual and Material Culture of Social Justice
Mar 14, 8:30 AM–5 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

*Please note: As a precaution against the spread of COVID-19, this event has been canceled.*

This symposium will examine the visual and material culture of social justice movements in the United States. Illustrated scholarly presentations will explore artistic expressions deployed to foster social, political, economic, and cultural change.

The years 2019 and 2020 mark significant anniversaries in the history of social justice movements in the United States, commemorating the many reform campaigns that have taken place from the 19th century to the present, including abolition/antislavery, women’s rights, and the civil rights movements for the African-American, LGBTQ, Native American, and disability communities. These campaigns sought political, social, economic, and cultural change, and they all deployed visual and material culture to advance their goals. The 2020 Wellesley-Deerfield Symposium will focus on research related to the wide range of artistic expression generated by social justice movements, from painting, sculpture, public performance, and installation to ephemera, costume, and craft.

Generously supported by:

the Barra Foundation.

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Archives

People with children in strollers in the Davis museum

Stroller Tours

Feb 12, Mar 11, Apr 8, May 13
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Spend an art-filled morning at the Davis strolling the galleries during this free guided tour—a special opportunity for families open before normal hours. Designed for art lovers and their little ones. Join us for a different theme on the second Wednesday of each month from 10:15-11 a.m.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

student wearing a Davis Museum t-shirt while standing in a gallery

Drop-in Public Tours

Feb 8–May 2, 2 PM
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Designed by Wellesley students representing a range of academic majors, these thematic tours of special exhibitions and permanent collections led by a student guide are free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. No tours on March 21 and March 28. For a full schedule of tours, please visit www.theDavis.org.

The Davis is committed to making our museum and programs accessible to all audiences. We encourage you to contact us about the following guided tour options, available for free with two weeks advance notice. To book your customized tour, please contact Arthurina Fears, Curator of Education and Programs, at afears@wellesley.edu or call 781.283.3045.

  • American Sign Language interpreted tours of the permanent collections and special exhibitions (subject to interpreter availability).
  • Tactile tours or verbal description tours of the permanent collections.
Generously supported by:

the Elizabeth Bein Keto ’48 Endowed Memorial Art Fund and Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.

Image of artwork in the Davis museum

Making Memories

Accessible Art Program for Adults Living with Alzheimer’s and Other Dementias
Feb 14, Mar 13, Apr 10, May 8
11 am in Davis Museum Lobby
Ticket information appears below

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Making Memories is an accessible arts program for adults living with early Alzheimer’s and other dementias and their care partners that provides a guided exploration of our permanent collections with specially trained museum staff and student guides. This free program offers opportunities to enjoy conversation, works of art, and new experiences at the Davis. Participation is free with advance registration. RSVPs required; in addition, private groups are encouraged to book a custom program.

Meet at 11 am in Davis Museum Lobby. For more information or to preregister, email Arthurina Fears, Curator of Education and Programs, at afears@wellesley.edu.

The Davis is committed to making our museum and programs accessible to all audiences. We encourage you to contact us about the following guided tour options, available for free with two weeks advance notice. To book your customized tour, please contact Arthurina Fears, Curator of Education and Programs, at afears@wellesley.edu or call 781.283.3045.

  • American Sign Language interpreted tours of the permanent collections and special exhibitions (subject to interpreter availability).
  • Tactile tours or verbal description tours of the permanent collections.

afears@wellesley.edu

Elizabeth Bein Keto ’48 Endowed Memorial Art Fund

Archival image of Dr. Harriett Alleyne Rice (Class of 1887), surrounded by purple geometric pattern and stylized shapes

Windows Invitational

Alexandria Smith: Seed to Harvest
Sep 1, 2019–Aug 31, 2020
Davis Museum Lobby Windows
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

The Windows Invitational engages artists in transforming the dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows that articulate the lobby and courtyard plaza of our signature Rafael Moneo building. The third commission in the series is by Alexandria Smith, head of painting at the Royal College of Art in London, formerly assistant professor of painting at Wellesley College.

Smith’s Seed to Harvest foregrounds portraits of Wellesley’s first African American graduates and borrows its title from the “Patternist” series of novels by Octavia Butler, stories that explore themes of science fiction, humanity, and the ethical and unethical uses of power. Rendering with hand-drawn and computer techniques, Smith embellishes original photographic portraits of five alumnae: Dr. Harriett Alleyne Rice (Class of 1887), Ethel M. Caution-Davis (Class of 1912), Katherine Naomi Robinson (Class of 1922), Clarissa Scott Delany (Class of 1923), and Jane Bolin (Class of 1928). She adds symbolic elements derived from her own visual vocabulary and from quilt patterns used to convey messages along the Underground Railroad (there were two stops in the town of Wellesley) to create the unique crests that adorn each with an honorific flourish.

Curated by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Wellesley’s Friends of Art at the Davis

abstract colorful painting by Elizabeth Mooney titled Cut Towards Center

Elizabeth Mooney, Cut Towards Center, 2019 (detail), Acrylic on wood panel, 48 x 48 inches.

Q20: Wellesley Faculty Artists

Feb 7–Jun 7
Camilla Chandler and Dorothy Buffum Chandler Gallery, Marjorie and Gerald Bronfman Gallery
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Q20 celebrates the inventive diversity of practices among professional faculty artists at Wellesley College. The 2020 edition of this quinquennial showcase at the Davis Museum features works across media, including photography, painting, collage, sculpture, book-arts, printmaking, installation, video, sound, and transmedial making.

The 10 artists included are: Jenny Olivia Johnson, Claudia Joskowicz, Phyllis McGibbon, Kelsey MillerElizabeth MooneyAndrew MowbrayDavid Teng OlsenDaniela Rivera, Katherine Ruffin, and William Van Beckum.

Q’20 is organized by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director of the Davis Museum, and Mark Beeman, manager of exhibitions and collections preparation, with major support from Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis and the Erna Bottigheimer Sands (class of 1929) Art Fund.

For more information, please contact:

781.283.2051

Image Credit:

Courtesy of the Elizabeth Mooney.

very old painting of a shirtless man (Saint Sebastian) pierced with arrows while people look on.

Unknown Venetian Artist, Holy Family with St. Catherine, St. Sebastian, and a Donor, 16th century, Oil on cradled panel, 49 3/8 in. x 65 3/4 in. (125.4 cm x 167 cm), Gift of Peter H. and Joan Macy Kaskell (Class of 1953) 2017.184.

Hidden Histories: Revealing the Life of a Painting

Sep 13, 2019–Jun 7, 2020
Robert and Claire Freedman Lober Viewing Alcove
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Hidden Histories: Revealing the Life of a Painting examines a 16th-century Venetian Sacra Conversazione, recently donated to the Davis Museum. This Holy Family with St. Catherine, St. Sebastian, and a donor was previously attributed to Giorgione, and exists in multiple versions, including one at the Musée du Louvre, Paris. Several important details in the Davis’s painting, such as the donor figure and the background landscape, differ from the other nearly identical works. Restorations, like the head of St. Joseph, are clearly visible on the canvas. The history of visual change evident in this painting spans centuries and now raises many questions: Who made it? How many artists or conservators worked on the painting? Why are there multiple copies, and why is this work different from the others? Hidden Histories explores this Sacra Conversazione painting through recent conservation, technical analysis, and an art historical lens to uncover a wealth of new information and highlight the unknown.

Co-curated by Alicia LaTores, Friends of Art Curatorial Research Assistant, and Katherine Davies ’19, the summer 2019 Eleanor P. DeLorme Museum Intern.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Peter H. Kaskell and Joan Macy Kaskell ’53.

sepia toned antique photos of a woman wearing a white dress and standing in various poses

André Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, Mme. Cusani, ca. 1860, Uncut albumen cartes-de-visite, 7 5/16 in. x 6 1/16 in.,

Making, Not Taking: Portrait Photography in the 19th Century

Feb 7–Jun 7
Joan Levine Freedman ’57 and Richard I. Freedman Gallery
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Mounted in conjunction with Going Viral: Photography, Performance, and the Everyday, this exhibition tells an earlier history of vernacular photography—that of 19th-century portraiture. Similar to snapshots, the portrait photograph is enigmatic for its ability to be a one-of-a-kind object (a family keepsake) and a duplicate (a repetition of conventional settings, poses, and framing devices) all at once. However, before photographs were taken or snapped, they were made. Early photography was a process that involved a great deal of time, labor, and costly materials. Thus, this exhibition explores the materiality, the craft, and the event of photography in its earliest iterations.

Curated by Carrie Cushman, Linda Wyatt Gruber ’66 Curatorial Fellow in Photography.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Linda Wyatt Gruber (class of 1966) and Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.

Image Credit:

Museum purchase with funds provided by Jacqueline Loewe Fowler (Class of 1947), 1997.47

sepia toned photograph of a person in the mountains, bending over with their rear end to the camera

Anonymous snapshot photograph, Gift of Peter J. Cohen, 2019.633

Going Viral: Photography, Performance, and the Everyday

Snapshots from the Peter J. Cohen Collection Gift
Feb 7–Jun 7
Morelle Lasky Levine '56 Works on Paper Gallery
Open to the Wellesley College campus community only

*Please Note: The Davis Museum at Wellesley College has suspended all public access through March 31. Public programs have been canceled or rescheduled and gallery access is limited to the Wellesley College campus community. Please call for more information and updates: 781.283.2051.*

Today, we use the phrase “going viral” to describe the rapid reception and reproduction of media on the internet. However, since the dawn of amateur photography in the late 19th century, critics have warned of a “universal snapping psychosis.” Long before the age of the selfie, the craze for candid cameras spawned innumerable tropes that snapshooters found irresistible. This exhibition of early 20th-century American snapshots considers our everyday relationship to photography: the ways in which we mediate, understand, and narrate our lives through the snapping and sharing of photographs, and how and why certain types of images become socially infectious.

Mined from the Peter J. Cohen Collection gift of nearly 1,000 anonymous snapshots, the exhibition is organized into 11 sections that explore various performances, rituals, and gestures that have gone viral via photography. The texts for each section provide micro-histories of these diverse social phenomena and demonstrate how vernacular photographs might function as affective historical documents and offer rich rewards for the imaginative historian, anthropologist, or sociologist.

The exhibition will also showcase an original Kodak camera, early amateur photography manuals, Kodak 1s and 2s, 20th-century album pages, and six photo albums as well as the latest from Kodak—the Printomatic—with which visitors can shoot and print their own snapshots in the gallery.

We invite you to share your own snapshots and impressions with us on social media using #davisgoingviral.

Curated by Carrie Cushman, Linda Wyatt Gruber ’66 Curatorial Fellow in Photography.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Linda Wyatt Gruber (class of 1966) and Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.

Leah Price

*CANCELLED* What We Talk About When We Talk About Books

A Lecture by Leah Price (Rutgers University)
Apr 30, 4:30 PM, May 1, 12:30 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

What We Talk About When We Talk About Books
Thursday, April 30th, 4:30-6:00pm
Newhouse Center Lounge

Pundits warn that as our appetite for books dwindles, so too do the virtues in which printed, bound objects once trained us. But English professor Leah Price finds scant proof that a golden age of reading ever existed. From the dawn of mass literacy to the invention of the paperback, most readers already skimmed and multitasked. The evidence that books are dying proves even scarcer. In encounters with librarians, booksellers, and activists who are reinventing old ways of reading, Price offers fresh hope to bibliophiles and literature lovers alike. This lecture is free and open to the public. 

Book Learning: Media History as Negative Pedagogy
Friday, May 1st, 12:30-2:00pm

Newhouse Center

After opening remarks on what Leah Price calls "negative pedagogy" — classroom strategies that rely on forbidding students to write, read, keyboard, or even look at a book — this workshop will open up for discussion of methods for integrating book arts with media history. What can book history and bookmaking contribute to media literacy, to research skills, and to what's too often dismissed under the ugly name of "study skills"? How can introducing students to media artifacts from different times and places help them make sense of their own information management practices, inside the classroom and beyond? Which aspects of bibliographical description can provide the most useful tools to cultivate students' skepticism about the institutions (commercial and otherwise) from which they derive their knowledge of the world?

This workshop is open to Wellesley's faculty, staff, and advanced students. 

image of Hélène E. Bilis standing in a garden, looking at the camera, and smiling

*CANCELLED* Lessons on a Literary Rivalry

Lessons on a Literary Rivalry: Corneille and Racine, Dueling Playwrights, A Presentation by Newhouse Fellow Hélène Bilis
Apr 21, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Newhouse Fellow Hélène E. Bilis analyzes the literary and cultural phenomenon of doublons: dueling plays on the same subject, by different playwrights, presented on two Parisian stages on nearly the same dates.

In 1670, Pierre Corneille and Jean Racine squared off with Tite et Bérénice vs. Bérénice. France’s foremost playwrights battled for box office receipts, public esteem, artistic superiority, and overall bragging rights. In highlighting their dramatic duel, Bilis asks what can be learned about the creative process when it occurs in such an outwardly competitive context and explores how subsequent accounts of the doublon complicate traditional notions of authorship, biography, influence, and literary prestige.

Hélène E. Bilis is an associate professor of French at Wellesley College. She is a 2019-2020 faculty fellow at the Newhouse Center for the Humanities. 

black and white image of two people looking at a video camera on a film shoo in the desert

*CANCELLED* Cinematic Offerings from AdeRisa Productions

The Importance of Representation: Cinematic Offerings from AdeRisa Productions
Apr 15, 4:30–6:30 PM, Apr 16, 12:45 PM
Collins Cinema (screenings) and the Newhouse Center for the Humanities (workshop)
Free and open to the public

Film screenings and discussions of the importance of representation in film and the opportunities independent films offer marginalized communities as they seek to tell their own stories.

This two-day event includes screenings of various short films from AdeRisa Productions, under the direction of Adelina Anthony and Marisa Becerra. Their company focuses on producing Two Spirit, LGBTQ+POC films with an emphasis on Xicana/o/x, Chicanx, Mexican, and Latinx stories. The first event includes a discussion with Anthony and Becerra and a screening of six award-winning short films: The Good Kind (2014), Gold Star (2016), Amigas with Benefits (2017), Guarding Santos (2019), Ode to Pablo (2019), and La Serenata (2019). The second event is a workshop designed for students interested in creating and funding independent films.

Generously supported by:

Women's and Gender Studies, LGBTQ Office, Latinx Advisor Office, Cinema and Media Studie, Education, American Studies, Latin American Studies, Spanish, Media Arts and Sciences, English and Creative Writing, Latinx Studies Minor

 Four Students in a Dorm Room in College Hall

Four students in a dorm room in College Hall (1881)

*CANCELLED* Hispanism Colloquium 2020

Transatlantic Hispanism, Feminism and Education: The Pioneers
Apr 14, 2–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

The Hispanism Colloquium 2020 will focus on literary and academic exchanges between Spain and the United States during the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century by exploring the innovative projects and intellectual dialogue that created and fostered cross-cultural understanding. 

  • Inspired by women's colleges of the Northeast United States, a group of pioneers, including Wellesley's professor of English, Katharine Lee Bates 1880, worked to establish the "International Institute for Girls in Spain" in order to bring a quality education to a long-underserved population. 
  • Harvard University's George Ticknor—an influential scholar, book collector and literary historian—established the first canon for the study of Spanish literature in the United States. Meanwhile, his wife, Anna Eliot Ticknor, and daughter, Anna E. Ticknor, contributed in unique ways to the growing international dialogue. 
  • Among the distinguished writers and academics who came to the United States to live and teach in the wake of the Spanish Civil War, Wellesley's Pedro Salinas and Jorge Guillén produced autobiographical writings that evolved significantly the longer they remained in their adopted home. 

Panelists include Anna Caballé (Universitat de Barcelona), José Manuel del Pino (Dartmouth College), Carlos Ramos (Wellesley College) and Margery Resnick (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). 

Generously supported by:

Department of Spanish, Women's and Gender Studies Department, and Education Department; and with the collaboration of The Leslie Center for the Humanities at Dartmouth College.

Image Credit:

Wellesley College Archives, Library and Technology Services

Composite image of Martín Espada and Yara Liceaga-Rojas

Martín Espada and Yara Liceaga-Rojas

*CANCELLED* Conversation and Bilingual Poetry Reading

Featuring Martín Espada and Yara Liceaga-Rojas
Apr 9, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

About Martín Espada
Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His latest collection of poems from Norton is called Vivas to Those Who Have Failed (2016). Other books of poems include The Trouble Ball (2011), The Republic of Poetry (2006), Alabanza (2003), A Mayan Astronomer in Hell’s Kitchen (2000), Imagine the Angels of Bread (1996), City of Coughing and Dead Radiators (1993) and Rebellion is the Circle of a Lover’s Hands (1990). He is the editor of What Saves Us: Poems of Empathy and Outrage in the Age of Trump (2019). His many honors include the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Creeley Award, the National Hispanic Cultural Center Literary Award, an American Book Award, an Academy of American Poets Fellowship, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. The Republic of Poetry was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His book of essays and poems, Zapata’s Disciple (1998), was banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona, and reissued by Northwestern University Press. A former tenant lawyer in Greater Boston’s Latinx community, Espada is a professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

About Yara Liceaga-Rojas
I am a queer Afro-Caribbean Puerto Rican mother, poet/writer, performer, cultural worker, and educator. My projects revolve around the visibility of marginalized subjects. I write and publish, perform at festivals, and coordinate projects that address origin, gender, race, and class. Coming from a United States colony, Puerto Rico, my main concern is to be visible since we as colonial subjects are made invisible. Self-determination has been stripped away from us. 

In projects, I gather multi-disciplinary artists - musicians, writers, performers, visual and audiovisual artists - and I include cisgender, trans, and non-binary folks, and/or BIPoC of various origins who are not usually given the space to perform their art. For example, my projects Acentos espesos/Thick Accents and Poetry Is Busy: Visible Caribe Series, portray the complexities of life for migrants who live in the United States. Making what's hidden visible is always a creative fuel for me. 

In 2019, I became a Brother Thomas Fellow and published Hacernos el adiós with the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture; I have five poetry books published in previous years. I've secured funding for my projects from Cambridge Arts, Kindle Project LLC, New England Foundation for the Arts' Creative City, The Boston Foundation's Live Arts Boston and the Boston Center for the Arts. El despojo: ¿Alguien ha/Has Anyone?, my latest project, deals with the experience of Hurricane María in the Puerto Rican Diaspora as a way of healing environmental disaster trauma.

Generously supported by:

the LatinX Advisor Office and MassPoetry

logo