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Musicians playing string instruments

Collegium Musicum Fall Concert

Dec 13, 7 PM
PNW 101
Free and open to the public

The Collegium Musicum is an ensemble of students and faculty, devoted to the performance of early music, drawn from the courts and chapels of Renaissance Europe, on original instruments. Directed by Laura Jeppesen.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form (the Wellesley contact for the form is concerts@wellesley.edu).

This performance may also be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Yanvalou performance

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble Fall Concert

Dec 10, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble will perform the folkloric music and dance of Africa, as it exists today throughout Africa and the African Diaspora, particularly in Haiti, Ghana, Zimbabwe, and Brazil. Directed by Kera Washington.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form (the Wellesley contact for the form is concerts@wellesley.edu).

This performance may also be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Musicians smiling and holding instruments

Wellesley BlueJazz Big Band Fall Concert

Dec 9, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Get on the jazz train this fall, with big band music of Count Basie, Chick Corea, Charles Mingus and more! Enjoy spirited big band jazz with the Wellesley BlueJazz Big Band. Directed by Cercie Miller.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form (the Wellesley contact for the form is concerts@wellesley.edu).

This performance may also be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Students playing instruments

BlueJazz Strings and Combos Fall Concert

Dec 2, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Join us for a lively evening as our wonderful instrumentalists and vocalists create the interplay between group and individual expression, weaving together musical influences from around the world, in the best of small ensemble jazz. Directed by Paula Zeitlin.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form (the Wellesley contact for the form is concerts@wellesley.edu).

This performance may also be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

 

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Three street lamps in front of snow-covered trees

Faculty Midday Muse: Tracy McGinnis, Kathleen Boyd, and Kyoko Hida-Battaglia

Dec 1, 1 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Join performance faculty members Tracy McGinnis, Kathleen Boyd, and Kyoko Hida-Battaglia, with Eliko Akahori and Erica Johnson, for a lunchtime concert, featuring works by Vivaldi, Quantz, and Poulenc.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form (the Wellesley contact for the form is concerts@wellesley.edu).

This performance may be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

 

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Brandeis-Wellesley orchestra members playing string instruments

Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra Fall Concert

Nov 19, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

The Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra is composed of students, faculty, staff, and associates of Wellesley College and Brandeis University, bringing inspiring performances of the great orchestral literature—past and present—to a new generation of musicians and audiences. Conducted by Neal Hampton.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form (the Wellesley contact for the form is concerts@wellesley.edu).

This performance may also be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Faculty performing

Classical Faculty Concert

Oct 29, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Members of the Music Department classical music performance faculty will perform some of their favorite compositions.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form (the Wellesley contact for the form is concerts@wellesley.edu).

This performance may also be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

 
For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

student playing the carillon

Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs

Directed by Margaret Angelini
Oct 21, 4 PM, Oct 29, 1 PM, Dec 3, 1 PM
Galen Stone Tower
Free and open to the public

The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the 90-year tradition of bell-ringing in Galen Stone Tower, which began when the carillon was first installed in 1931.

  • Family and Friends Tower: Friday, October 21, 4-6 p.m.
  • Halloween Tower: Saturday, October 29, 1-3 p.m.
  • Holiday Tower: Saturday, December 3, 1-3 p.m.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form (the Wellesley contact for the form is concerts@wellesley.edu).

This performance may also be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

 

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Choir members standing and singing

Wellesley College Choral Program: The Dober Memorial Concert

Nov 5, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

The highly acclaimed Wellesley College Choral program promotes the great art of ensemble singing while building community and joy in performance. Directed by Lisa Graham, Evelyn Barry Director of Choral Music.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form (the Wellesley contact for the form is concerts@wellesley.edu).

This performance may also be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Kate Price, Janelle Nanos, Linda Williams, Layli Maparyan

Searching for Truth: Healing from Child Sexual Exploitation

Oct 19, 1 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

A decade ago, WCW Visiting Scholar Kate Price, Ph.D., and Boston Globe Journalist Janelle Nanos, M.A., began a journey together to investigate Price’s history as a child sex trafficking survivor. The culmination of their partnership, a multi-media article in the Boston Globe Magazine, was published in July 2022. During this program, Nanos and Price will discuss their project and how they unearthed pieces of Price’s history. Price and WCW Senior Research Scientist Linda Williams, Ph.D., will also share their research and expertise on child sexual abuse cases, how Price’s personal experience connects to broader research findings, and how society can better support healing and justice for survivors of child sexual abuse and exploitation.

Please register in advance for this event.

This virtual program is part of the Social Change Dialogues series hosted by the Wellesley Centers for Women, with support from the Cowles/Sulzberger Fund. The program will be recorded and shared with those who cannot attend live.

Panelists:

  • Kate Price, Ph.D., Visiting Scholar, Wellesley Centers for Women; Expert on prevention of child sexual exploitation

  • Janelle Nanos, M.A., Journalist, The Boston Globe

  • Linda M. Williams, Ph.D., Director of the Justice and Gender-Based Violence Research Initiative; Senior Research Scientist, Wellesley Centers for Women

  • Moderated by Layli Maparyan, Ph.D., Executive Director, Wellesley Centers for Women

For more information, please contact:

wcw@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Cowles/Sulzberger Fund

Aerial view of Science Complex

Wellesley College Science Complex Opening Celebration

Oct 3, 2–5 PM
Science Center
See access restrictions below

In spring 2022, Wellesley completed the ambitious reimagining of the Science Complex, the most significant capital project the College has undertaken in the past 100 years. The new Science Complex represents a critical investment in our students, our faculty, and our future.

To mark the opening of its newly transformed Science Complex, the College is convening a half day series of events on October 3 to celebrate the power of STEM. The program will include:

2 p.m.: Opening remarks by President Paula A. Johnson, M.D., M.P.H. and Massachusetts Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito, following by a keynote speech from Reshma Kewalramani, M.D., CEO and president, Vertex Pharmaceuticals

3 p.m.: Panel discussion focused on changing the culture of STEM with leaders from higher education, government, life sciences, and technology, featuring:

  • Jake Auchincloss, United States Representative for Massachusetts
  • Dana Im ’10 M.D., director of quality and safety, department of emergency medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • Reshma Kewalramani, M.D., CEO and president, Vertex Pharmaceuticals
  • Nergis Mavalvala ’90, Ph.D., dean of the MIT School of Science; Curtis and Kathleen Marble Professor of Astrophysics, MIT

4 p.m.: Community reception and research poster session. Remarks by President JohnsonColin Koop, design partner, SOM; and Megan Núñez, Nan Walsh Schow ’54 and Howard B. Schow Professor in the Physical and Natural Sciences, professor of chemistry, and dean of faculty AffairsPerformance by the Observatory Hill Ramblers.

 

Please RSVP to attend the celebration. The program will also be livestreamed if you cannot attend in person.

This celebration is part of STEM Forward, an effort that will continue throughout the year with events highlighting the role of science and technology in confronting some of our greatest challenges, new programming from career education, and rich storytelling around Wellesley’s leadership in the sciences.

For more information, please contact:

publicaffairs@wellesley.edu

Book cover for “Becoming Mary Sully”

Philip J. DeLoria: “Becoming Mary Sully”

Oct 25, 5:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Dakota Sioux artist Mary Sully was the great-granddaughter of respected nineteenth-century portraitist Thomas Sully, who captured the personalities of America’s first generation of celebrities (including Andrew Jackson, as immortalized on the twenty-dollar bill). Born on the Standing Rock reservation in South Dakota in 1896, she was largely self-taught. Steeped in the visual traditions of beadwork, quilling, and hide painting, she also engaged with the experiments in time, space, symbolism, and representation characteristic of early twentieth-century modernist art. Sully’s position on the margins of the art world meant that her work was exhibited only a handful of times during her life. In Becoming Mary Sully, Philip J. Deloria reclaims that work from obscurity, exploring her stunning portfolio through the lenses of modernism, industrial design, Dakota women’s aesthetics, mental health, ethnography and anthropology, primitivism, and the American Indian politics of the 1930s. Deloria recovers in Sully’s work a move toward an anti-colonial aesthetic that claimed a critical role for Indigenous women in American Indian futures—within and distinct from American modernity and modernism.

Please register in advance for this webinar.

Philip J. Deloria (Dakota descent) is professor of history at Harvard University and the author of Indians in Unexpected Places and Playing Indian. His most recent book, coauthored with Alexander I. Olson, is American Studies: A User’s Guide. He is a trustee of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian, where he chairs the Repatriation Committee; a former president of the American Studies Association; and an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

For more information, please contact:

skhanred@wellesley.edu or 781-283-2051

Book covers for "Sea People" and "Come on Shore and We Will Kill and Eat You All"

Christina Thompson: “How Do We Tell the Story of What Happened?”

Oct 20, 5:30 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Christina Thompson is the author of Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia, which won the 2020 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for nonfiction and the 2019 NSW Premier's General History Prize and was a finalist for the 2020 Phi Beta Kappa Ralph Waldo Emerson Award, the 2019 Mountbatten Maritime Award, the 2019 Sigurd F. Olson Nature Writing Award, and the 2019 Queensland Literary Award. Her first book, Come on Shore and We Will Kill and Eat You All, was a finalist for the 2009 NSW Premier's Literary Award and the 2010 William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. She is the recipient of fellowships from the NEA and NEH, including a Public Scholar Award. Her essays have appeared in the New York Times, Vogue, American Scholar, and BBC World Histories. She teaches in the Writing Program at Harvard University Extension and can be found at christinathompson.net.

 

Please register in advance for this webinar.

For more information, please contact:

skhanred@wellesley.edu or 781-283-2051

Earring made of gold and garnet

Roman, Openwork Earring, 3rd–6th century C.E., Gold and garnet(?), Anonymous gift 2002.0.122

 

Gallery Talk: Laure Marest in Conversation with Nicole Berlin

Gems and Jewelry in the Ancient Mediterranean World
Oct 5, 1 PM
L2, FoA Gallery, Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

Join Dr. Laure Marest, Associate Curator of Greek and Roman Art at the MFA, Boston and Dr. Nicole Berlin, Assistant Curator of Collections, for new perspectives on gems and jewelry in the ancient Mediterranean world. This program is organized in conjunction with the exhibition Gold, Glass, and Pearls: Ancient Mediterranean Jewelry.

Visiting the Davis

All visitors are required to register in the Davis lobby, show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination, and masks are recommended while in the galleries.

 

For more information, please contact:

skhanred@wellesley.edu or 781-283-2051

Oil painting on canvas

Virginia Berresford, Fort at Antibes, 1929, Oil on canvas, Museum purchase, The Class of 1947 Acquisition Fund 2018.277

Telling Time: Recent Acquisitions

Sep 15–Dec 18
Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

Over the last five years, the Davis has acquired thousands of artworks through gifts and purchases. At the same time, staff members have asked new questions about what the Davis can be, as an institution committed to stewarding and interpreting artworks from the past and of the present. As Achille Mbembe has argued, museums have historically served racist colonial structures that imagined most people in the world to exist “outside of time.” What happens to our experiences of time if we try to, as author Ariella Aïsha Azoulay describes, “rewind the imperial condition”? In classes, extracurricular decolonial theory reading sessions, and staff meetings, Wellesley students and employees have read curator Yesomi Umolu’s call to care for bodies and their politics. In our galleries, we invite you to join us in inventing visual and corporeal experiences that can reorient our understandings of time, race, museums, and empire.  

These recent acquisitions contribute to shifting narratives at Wellesley and in the museum field writ large. “Recent” may imply “new,” but in these galleries—and those that surround it—we witness how objects come into the museum marked by their histories. Through the care, labor, and time of many, they become parts of ongoing human stories—at the Davis and around the world. 

Curated by Amanda Gilvin, Sonja Novak Koerner ’51 Senior Curator and Assistant Director of Curatorial Affairs.

Visiting the Davis

All visitors are required to register in the Davis lobby, show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination, and masks are recommended while in the galleries.

For more information, please contact:

skhanred@wellesley.edu or 781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

the Anonymous ’70 Endowed Museum Program Fund

Image Credit:

Copyright owned by the artist’s estate

video still from exhibition

Lisa Reihana, In Pursuit of Venus [infected], 2015-17, video still

 

Lisa Reihana: In Pursuit of Venus [infected]

Sep 15–Dec 18
Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

Māori artist Lisa Reihana’s conceptually provocative panorama, In Pursuit of Venus [infected] (iPOVi), 2015-2017, is based on a fashionable early nineteenth-century French scenic wallpaper, Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique (see the reproduction on view in the adjacent Bronfman Gallery), that capitalized on popular fascination with the voyages of Captain James Cook and other European “explorers” to the South Pacific. The wallpaper painted Pasifika peoples, cultures, and lands through a lens at once romanticizing and abstracting, embellishing primitivist colonial stereotypes of the “Noble Savage” and the “Dusky Maiden.”

Reihana says she “chose to transgress the wallpaper’s conventions. Well aware of the slippery nature of viewpoints and truth, I deliberately included scenes that show the risks of encounter and cultural conflicts… I used several techniques in my attempts to resist what I describe as the “festival gaze” (brown bodies on show).” 

Reihana staged dances, ceremonies, and scenes of cross-cultural encounter and used digital strategies to suture live-action reenactments over a hand-painted backdrop appropriated from Les Sauvages. A soundtrack adds birdsong, ocean, Aboriginal singing, drumming, the ticking of the Royal Society’s clock, taonga puoro (Māori instruments), various voices and languages, and electronic rhythms. Compositionally, the seamless scrolling loop privileges the Māori conception of space-time, as non-linear, three-dimensional, and spiraling. Martin Rumsby notes that “the viewpoint here is a Native one, looking from the land toward the sea from which the eighteenth-century Europeans have arrived.”

Reihana destabilizes the dominant historical narrative of encounter, flipping the script to center Indigenous people as agents rather than subjects, privileging Native realities, experiences, and points of view. She vividly reframes the historical stereotypes that linger from Cook’s colonizing endeavors forward, challenging the imperial gaze—as she put it—“with a twist that disrupts previous notions of beauty, history, authenticity.” The critique embedded in the work is political, aesthetic, technological, and historical—rendered through a decolonial lens.

In ways that mark the distinction of Reihana’s vision and artistic practice, iPOVi accumulates new resonances with the colonial histories in every context of its presentation.  What does iPOVi look like in Massachusetts, against Eurocentric mythologies of “first encounter” and “Thanksgiving”? How does it resonate at the Davis Museum at Wellesley College?

 

Visiting the Davis

All visitors are required to register in the Davis lobby, show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination, and masks are recommended while in the galleries.

About the Exhibition

The exhibition extends from the main Chandler Gallery presentation of In Pursuit of Venus [infected] to the adjacent Bronfman Gallery, which stages a 75% reproduction of Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique, the fashionable wallpaper that inspired Lisa Reihana, along with a print, The Head of a New Zealander of 1773, after an original rendering by Sydney Parkinson, shipboard artist to the HMS Endeavor, and a library table and chairs for perusal of titles on subjects related to Māori art and global Indigeneity.

 

In Pursuit of Venus [infected] premiered at the Auckland Art Gallery in 2015, represented New Zealand at the Venice Biennale in 2017, and has been shown worldwide to great acclaim. See www.inpursuitofvenus.com/ for full production credits.

Curated by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director of the Davis Museum, with research contributions from Annabel Brazaitis ’22, Stephanie Fan ’22, Chloe Pearce ’21, and Isak Sjursen. 

About Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique

The wallpaper’s title, which translates from the French most egregiously to “The Savages of the Pacific Ocean,” signals the ways in which this opulent panorama exoticized the representation of Indigenous peoples of the “South Seas”—solidifying and exploiting colonial tropes of “savage” otherness and reifying the vision of imperial France through luxurious interior design. This “colonial picturesque,” as Nicholas Thomas puts it, debuted at the Fourth Paris Industrial Exposition, opened by Emperor Napoleon in February 1806. 

A feat of contemporary technical expertise, the wallpaper was designed by Jean-Gabriel Charvet (1750–1829) and printed by Joseph Dufour et Cie (1742–1827); its twenty “drop” panels featured one thousand woodblock prints and hand painted elements. The imagery capitalized on popular fascination with the Pacific voyages of Captain James Cook and the exploits of subsequent invaders. Adapted at a far remove from original sources, including the landscapes, figures, dress, and adornment depicted in the many drawings and paintings such voyages produced, the images have been further romanticized, classicized, and idealized into a complex colonial pastiche. The figures are garbed with a Grecian flourish in neo-classical drapery and set into paradisiacal Acadian scenes. The panels reinforce the racist underpinnings of Enlightenment thinking and embellish specific representational strategies used to depict encounters between colonizing “explorers” and Pasifika peoples and cultures. As Lisa Reihana writes: “This fascinating wallpaper is a concoction, a fabulation invented in someone else’s elsewhere.”

About The Head of a New Zealander

This print reproduces (in reverse) a pen and wash original by Sydney Parkinson, one of two artists aboard the HMS Endeavor. In style and treatment, it reflects Parkinson’s training as a botanical illustrator and the tenets of ethnographic depiction: it is guided by the conventions of “observational naturalism” and inflected by what might be called “imperial realism.”

One immediately wonders about the conditions of its production: Did the subject sit for the picture? How did artist and sitter communicate? What was involved in the exchange? Persuasion? Coercion? Force? Barter? Trade?

When Cook sailed from England to chart the 1769 Transit of Venus and to seek the continent of “Terra Australis Incognita,” he did so as an agent of imperial exploration, charged with the “discovery” and cataloguing of sea and sky, flora and fauna, and all natural resources—for king and crown. In the colonial view, Indigenous people were similarly categorized, and Cook’s orders were: “likewise to observe the Genius, Temper, Disposition and Number of the Natives….”

Colonial expansion and exploitation had devastating effects on the Indigenous peoples of the Pacific, rupturing traditional cultures and languages, incurring myriad losses, bringing disease, enforcing displacement. The imperative to collect produced fraught encounters; it happened by gift and trade, also by theft and violence. The material legacy of such voyages now resides largely in museums; by necessity, Lisa Reihana turned to such collections to reconstruct pre-contact Indigenous dress and adornment.  

Parkinson’s portraits, including this one, exoticized Indigenous sitters into types, stripping individuals from their network of relations and eliminating the complexities of full humanity. They were the first images of Māori warriors made for European audiences, and it would be hard to overstate their hold on the eighteenth-century European imagination—and far beyond. For Reihana, this portrait not only “is the most reproduced image from the entire archive of European travel,” but also “defined the conventions and stereotypes I am hoping to break.”    

 

About the Star Map

One entry wall in the gallery features a star map, which plots the Position of the Sun, Mercury, and Venus during the Transit of Venus as seen by James Cook from Tahiti, June 3, 1769, Papeete, French Polynesia.

When Cook set sail on the HMS Endeavour from Plymouth, England, on August 26, 1768 his was a planned voyage of circumnavigation, plotted in part to observe a celestial rarity, the Transit of Venus. Ahead lay a vast unknown: the Pacific Ocean covers almost one third of our planet and includes scores of islands. He was accompanied by naturalists, astronomers, cartographers, and—unusually—skilled artists, hired to document the much anticipated “discoveries” of a world little known to Europeans. A crucial addition to the crew was Tupaia, an extraordinarily skilled star navigator, mapmaker, translator, and ario (priest) from Ra’iatea who guided the ship to Tahiti and onward to Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia.

About the Artist

Lisa Reihana (b. 1964, Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand) is a multi-disciplinary artist of Māori (Ngā Puhi) descent whose practice spans film, sculpture, costume and body adornment, text, and photography. Her work has been presented around the world: solo exhibitions include Mai i te aroha, ko te aroha, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, New Zealand (2008); Lisa Reihana: Digital Marae, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand (2007); and Native Portraits n.19897, Museo Laboratorio di Arte Contemporanea, Rome, Italy (2007).

Important group exhibitions include Oceania, Royal Academy, London, England (2018); Pacific Sisters: Fashion Activists, Te Papa Tongarewa: Wellington, New Zealand (2018); Tai Whetuki – House of Death Redux, The Walters Prize 2016, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland, New Zealand (2016); Suspended Histories, Museum Van Loon, Amsterdam, Netherlands (2013); Close Encounters: The Next 500 Years, Plug In ICA, Winnipeg, Canada (2011); Global Feminisms, Brooklyn Museum, New York (2007); and Paradise Now? Contemporary Art from the Pacific, Asia Society Museum, New York (2004). 

Reihana was honored with an Arts Laureate Award by the Arts Foundation of New Zealand in 2014, the Te Tohu Toi Ke Te Waka Toi Maori Arts Innovation Award from Creative New Zealand in 2015, and was made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2018.

For more information, please contact:

skhanred@wellesley.edu or 781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

the Mildred Cooper Glimcher ’61 Endowed Fund, the Davis World Cultures Fund, the Davis Museum Endowed Fund for International Cultural Programs, and Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis.

Roman pair of gold earrings

Roman, Pair of Earrings, 2nd–4th century C.E., Gold and glass, Anonymous gift 2002.0.128

Gold, Glass, and Pearls: Ancient Mediterranean Jewelry

Sep 15–Dec 18
Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

The numerous examples of jewelry that survive from the ancient Mediterranean suggest that it was an important means of self-expression for people of all social classes. Expert craftspeople transformed both modest and luxurious materials into sophisticated works of art. A single gold earring represents the complex routes of trade across long distances, the technical skill of the artisan who fashioned it, and the taste of the person who purchased it. Through a focus on craftsmanship and technology, Gold, Glass, and Pearls examines the journey from raw materials to objects of personal adornment. Overall, the Davis Museum’s collection of Greco-Roman jewelry tells the manifold stories of the people who created and wore it thousands of years ago.

The exhibition was curated by Nicole Berlin, Assistant Curator of Collections.

Visiting the Davis

All visitors are required to register in the Davis lobby, show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination, and masks are recommended while in the galleries.

For more information, please contact:

skhanred@wellesley.edu or 781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

the Sandra Cohen Bakalar ’55 Fund and Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis, with special thanks to Wellesley College Special Collections

Print titled Sunday Promenade

Hale Aspacio Woodruff, Sunday Promenade, 1931-46 (printed 1996), Linocut, sheet, Gift of Isabel Carter Johnston Stewart (Class of 1961) in memory of Kathryn Hoffman (Class of 1983) 1999.9.8 © 2022 Estate of Hale Woodruff/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Freedom of Expression: African American Printmakers Abroad

Sep 15–Dec 18
Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

Throughout the twentieth century, African American artists traveled or permanently relocated abroad for various—but often overlapping—reasons. They sought to escape systemic racial oppression in the United States, pursue specialized artistic training, collaborate with artists with shared political ideologies, and seek inspiration from new surroundings. This exhibition highlights the impact of overseas travel on the artistic practices of ten artists who journeyed from the US to Europe, Africa, and Latin America. By focusing on printmaking, Freedom of Expression examines how artists embraced one particular medium as a vehicle for technical experimentation, personal expression, and social commentary.

Often funded through private philanthropic organizations, Black artists working from the 1920s through the 1940s were drawn to countries reputed to be welcoming to expatriates of color and where they could receive training in avant-garde styles to help them achieve new levels of international prominence. In France, Americans trained under leading Modernist artists in academies and private studios and viewed collections of African art. For some, France was a launchpad to other European visual traditions, like German Expressionism and Scandinavian folk art. Those hoping to use their practice to advance social causes traveled to Mexico, where they learned how to make prints at the Taller de Gráfica Popular—an activist printmaking collective. Later artists charted their own international paths, identifying educational opportunities and expanding their cultural horizons across the globe. The artworks in this focused exhibition provide an introduction to an expansive history of Black American artists who profited from the creative, social, and professional opportunities afforded by living overseas. 

This exhibition is curated by Heather Hughes, former Kemper Assistant Curator of Academic Affairs and Exhibitions at the Davis and current Kathy and Ted Fernberger Associate Curator of Prints at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, with the 2021 Davis Museum Interns—Chloe Pearce ’21, Grey Devlin ’22, Kay Bobb ’23, and Uttkantha Sindhwani ’22.

Visiting the Davis

All visitors are required to register in the Davis lobby, show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination, and masks are recommended while in the galleries.

For more information, please contact:

skhanred@wellesley.edu or 781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

the Kemper Curator of Academic Programs Fund

Woman dribbling a basketball outside on multicolored court; buildings in the background

Molteni, Maria, A Sea Bird (video detail) (2021), Industrial concrete/ground paint, colors mixed by hand, hand painted with brushes by 4 Molteni

Prilla Smith Brackett Award Ceremony

Oct 18, 6:30 PM
Davis Museum Lobby; Virtual
Free and open to the public

Join us for a celebration of the second Prilla Smith Brackett Award, which honors an outstanding female-identified visual artist based in the Greater Boston area. Funded by Prilla Smith Brackett (Wellesley Class of 1964) and administered by the Davis Museum at Wellesley College, the Brackett Award is given to the artist whose work and exhibition record demonstrate extraordinary artistic vision, talent, and skill. Celebrate the 2022 PSB Award winner with the Brackett Award Jurors and the award’s generous sponsor, Prilla Smith Brackett!

The ceremony will also be livestreamed on Zoom. To participate virtually, please register in advance.

Visiting the Davis

All visitors are required to register in the Davis lobby, show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination, and masks are recommended while in the galleries.

For more information, please contact:

skhanred@wellesley.edu or 781-283-2051

Image Credit:

Courtesy of the artist

Photo of Ruth Ozeki

The Jordan Lecture: A Reading and Conversation with Ruth Ozeki

Nov 7, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center Lounge
Free and open to the public

Ruth Ozeki is a filmmaker, novelist, and Zen Buddhist priest, whose award-winning novels have been described as “witty, intelligent and passionate” by The Independent, and as possessing “shrewd and playful humor, luscious sexiness and kinetic pizzazz” by the Chicago Tribune.

Ruth Ozeki’s 2013 novel, A Tale for the Time Being, was shortlisted for the 2013 Man Booker Prize and explores the relationships between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth. Her latest novel, The Book of Form and Emptiness (2021), the 2022 winner of the Women’s Prize for Fiction, is a brilliantly inventive new story about a boy who hears the voices of objects all around him and a mother drowning in her possessions.  

Ruth Ozeki was born and raised in New Haven, Connecticut, by an American father and a Japanese mother. She studied English and Asian Studies at Smith College and traveled extensively in Asia. She received a Japanese Ministry of Education Fellowship to do graduate work in classical Japanese literature at Nara University. During her years in Japan, she worked in Kyoto’s entertainment or “water” district as a bar hostess, studied flower arrangement as well as Noh drama and mask carving, founded a language school, and taught in the English Department at Kyoto Sangyo University.

 

For more information, please contact:

lcote2@wellesley.edu

grayscale image of person pursing their lips and holding up three fingers

Theatre Studies Fall 2022 Mainstage Production: Cabaret

Music by John Kander, Lyrics by Fred Ebb, Book by Joe Masteroff, Directed by Marta Rainer
Dec 8–Dec 11
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre, Alumnae Hall
See access restrictions below

Set in 1929–1930 Berlin during the twilight of the Jazz Age as the Nazis are ascending to power, the musical focuses on the divinely decadent Kit Kat Klub and all who escape into the nightlife of the Weimar Republic, including American writer Clifford Bradshaw and the ambitious English cabaret performer Sally Bowles.

In-person performances will take place on the following dates:

  • Thursday, December 8 at 7:00pm
  • Friday, December 9 at 7:00pm
  • Saturday, December 10 at 2:00pm
  • Saturday, December 10 at 7:00pm
  • Sunday, December 11 at 2:00pm

Free for Wellesley College students. Tickets will be available in mid-November. Please check the Theatre Studies Events page for information and reservations!

For more information, please contact:

Sarah Vandewalle, Theatre Studies Academic Administrator, sv104@wellesley.edu

Jennifer Yee

Jennifer Yee

French House Virtual Lecture Series: Jennifer Yee

Baudelaire’s Melancholy Orientalism
Oct 27, 12:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Charles Baudelaire’s exoticism is mediated by his passion for the visual arts. His admiration for the colourist, painterly style of Eugène Delacroix was deep and long-lasting, and he was particularly fascinated by the monumental Death of Sardanapalus and the two versions of Women of Algiers in their Apartment. Baudelaire’s response to Delacroix thus provides a key to understanding the Orientalism that underlies his exotic writings more widely. Among the many things that make us uneasy in Baudelaire’s works are his treatment of slavery, his ‘othering’ of the East and of women, and his fascination with cruelty and violence. But we should also not lose sight of the fact that his writing aims deliberately to unsettle and confront the ‘hypocrite lecteur’ (hypocritical reader): we too are the cruel Oriental Despot.

This paper explores the melancholy nature of Baudelaire’s poetic Orientalism, which simultaneously invokes the fantasy of exotic wish-fulfillment and reveals it to be impossible. Situating this Orientalism in the specific context of nineteenth-century France – when the geopolitical background of the ‘Question d’Orient’ overlaps with anxieties about the place of the individual in emerging capitalist, bourgeois modernity – may give us a key to understanding the ‘secret douloureux’ (the painful secret) of ‘La Vie antérieure.’

Please register in advance for this event.

Jennifer Yee is a Professor of Literature in French at the University of Oxford (Christ Church), and Deputy Chair of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages.

For more information, please contact:

ls114@wellesley.edu

Éric Fassin

Éric Fassin

Éric Fassin: Why Academic Freedom Matters

The Politics of Anti-Intellectualism
Oct 6, 12:45 PM
Virtual
Free and open to the public

Academic freedom is under attack, in overtly illiberal regimes as well as in ostensibly liberal ones – not only from Hungary to Turkey, but also from France to the United States. The usual targets range from the (so-called) “ideology of gender” to Critical Race Studies – that is, critical thought. Paradoxically, these attacks are often launched in the name of freedom of expression, echoing the polemic against so-called “cancel culture.” This battle is about the status of truth in democratic societies. Truth is not just a matter of opinion, since opinion is about values. But the search for truth is the intellectual value that defines academic work.

Please register in advance for this virtual event.

Éric Fassin is a professor of sociology at Paris 8 University with a joint appointment in the Department of Political Science and the Department of Gender Studies affiliated with the first research center in gender studies in France, created in 2015. He is also a senior member of the Institut Universitaire de France. His research focuses on contemporary sexual and racial politics with a comparative, transnational perspective.

For more information, please contact:

ls114@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

The French House and the Suzy Newhouse Center for the Humanities

Fadzayi Mahere

Fadzayi Mahere

Youth and Democracy in Africa and the World

A talk and Q&A with Fadzayi Mahere
Oct 6, 7 PM
Collins Cinema
See access restrictions below

Presented by the Department of Africana Studies, Wellesley is thrilled to welcome Fadzayi Mahere, a lawyer and politician who is currently one of the youngest women involved in Zimbabwe national politics, to talk about the future of democracy in Zimbabwe and around the world.

The event is open to all Wellesley College students, faculty, and staff. Please register in advance. The event is also open to members of the public by advance registration only.

Doors will open at 6:15 p.m. In addition to the ticket, all attendees will be required to present a photo ID. No photography or recording will be allowed during this event.

COVID-19 Protocols

All visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form.

Security Procedures

All persons and bags are subject to search for safety by assigned security personnel. The following items are prohibited for the event:

  • Bags larger than 12x6x12, backpacks, smoking or e-cigarettes, weapons (including pocket knives), posters or signs larger than 8.5x11, video cameras, and artificial noisemakers/radios

Parking

Public parking is available at the Davis Parking Facility, adjacent to the Wellesley Campus Police.

 

For more information, please contact:

Lizette Rodriguez-Ponce, lrodriguezponce@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Office of the Provost, Albright Institute, and Knapp Social Science Center

people playing chamber music

Chamber Music Society Fall Concerts

Dec 4, 2 PM, Dec 11, 7 PM, Dec 12, 7 PM, Dec 14, 7 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Founded in 1958, The Chamber Music Society of Wellesley College provides an opportunity for instrumentalists and vocalists to prepare and perform works for small ensembles. Each chamber group receives weekly coaching from a member of the Wellesley College Music Department, and performs at one of several concerts held at the end of each semester. Directed by David Russell and Jenny Tang.

Performances will take place on the following dates:

  • Sunday, December 4, 2:00 p.m.
  • Sunday, December 11, 7:00 p.m.
  • Monday, December 12, 7:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday, December 14, 7:00 p.m.

Masks are required in the venue. Please note, all visitors to the College must be vaccinated and complete the visitor registration form.

This performance may also be viewed online on the Concert Series YouTube channel.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu