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New Yorker cartoon of critic reviewing piece of art

Critics’ Roundtable

With K. Austin Collins (Vanity Fair), Amanda Petrusich (The New Yorker), and Alexandra Schwartz (The New Yorker), hosted by Dan Chiasson
Dec 5, 5 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities, Green Hall, Second Floor
Free and open to the public

A roundtable discussion of the art of writing criticism on deadline, for general audiences. What kinds of choices do critics make when they work up a piece? How do they see the role of praise and promotion in their work? Under what circumstances would they publish a negative review? An hour of lively discussion of the critical art, with questions from the audience.

The critics include:

K. Austin Collins: Collins is a film critic for Vanity Fair. His writing has appeared in The Ringer, the Los Angeles Review of Books, Reverse Shot, and the Brooklyn Rail. He writes crosswords for The New Yorker, The New York Times and the American Values Crossword Club.

Amanda Petrusich: Petrusich is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of three books. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in nonfiction and has been nominated for a Grammy Award. Her criticism and features have appeared in the Times, The Oxford American, Spin, Pitchfork, GQ, Esquire, The Atlantic, and the Virginia Quarterly Review. Her most recent book, “Do Not Sell At Any Price,” explored the obsessive world of 78-r.p.m. record collectors. She is an assistant professor at New York University’s Gallatin School.

Alexandra Schwartz: Schwartz has been a a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2016. She was the winner of the National Book Critics Circle’s Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing for 2014.

The roundtable is hosted by Dan Chaisson, Lorraine C. Wang Professor of English at Wellesley and the poetry critic for The New Yorker.

 

For more information, please contact:

nchadmin@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

The Newhouse Center for the Humanities and the English department.

Image Credit:

Condé Nast Collection

watercolor painting of people working in what looks like an old factory

Newhouse Faculty Series: Rebecca Summerhays

The Novel on the Defensive: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, William Paley’s Natural Theology, and the Human Machine
Nov 4, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Newhouse Center faculty fellow Rebecca Summerhays, a visiting lecturer in the Writing Program, discusses her ongoing research project. Her research interests include Victorian fiction, natural history, evolutionary theory, narrative theory, and feminist theory.

Representations of Victor Frankenstein’s monster, both popular and critical, refuse to see him whole. That is, in both film and theory, the creature is either a hideous body or a beautiful mind, but rarely both. Summerhays argues instead that the monster embodies the grim truth of human life in the mechanical age: to survive industrialization, workers had to become more machine than human, physically and psychically bound by what Shelley describes as “mechanical impulse” to other workers and the machines they operated. To make this argument, Summerhays reads Shelley’s novel as a critical response to William Paley’s enormously popular (if all-but-forgotten) creationist “classic,” Natural Theology (1802). Natural Theology is remarkable for its attempt to consecrate machinery, requiring readers to worship all bodies, including their own, as miniature versions of the factories, mills, and refineries springing up around Britain. For Shelley, the biomechanical world that Paley romanticizes places the novel form on the defensive. How did the novel subsequently evolve in the early nineteenth century, when machine deposed the mind as the seat of human consciousness and life itself?

Chamber music society concert

Chamber Music Society Concert Series

David Russell and Jenny Tang, Directors
Dec 4, Dec 5, Dec 8, Dec 10
Various locations
Free and open to the public

Founded in 1958, the Chamber Music Society of Wellesley College provides an opportunity for instrumentalists and vocalists to prepare and perform works for small ensembles. Each chamber group receives weekly coaching from a member of the Wellesley College Music Department and performs at one of several concerts held at the end of each semester.

Concert 1: December 4 | 7 p.m. | Jewett Auditorium

Concert 2: December 5 | 7 p.m. | Sargent Salon (PNW 101)

Concert 3: December 8 | 2 p.m. | Jewett Auditorium

Concert 4: December 10 | 7 p.m. | Jewett Auditorium

 

 

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

image of a woman guiding a man through a landscape. The man has a walking stick and his eyes are shut.

Antoni Brodowski's 1828 painting Oedipus and Antigone

Newhouse Center Faculty Series: Carol Dougherty

The Question of the Foreigner in Sophocles’ Antigone
Nov 19, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Newhouse Center faculty fellow Carol Dougherty explores the ways that Sophocles’ Antigone brings immigration, marriage, and burial together to destabilize Athens’ own democratic strategies for accommodating the stranger within the city in ways that resonate with contemporary issues of citizenship, mobility, and political identity.

Carol Dougherty is a professor in Comparative Literature and classical studies at Wellesley College.

Generously supported by:

the Newhouse Center for the Humanities.

sheet of music on top of a piano keyboard

Classical Faculty Concert: Spiritual World

Nov 9, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

From Ravel's Piano Trio (1914) to Jonathan Harvey's Advaya for cello and electronics (1994), this program explores a wide spectrum of spiritual sonorities. Performers include Jenny Tang, piano; David Russell, cello; Jenny Johnson, electronics; and others.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

portrait of actor Yalitza Aparicio

Yalitza Aparicio

An Evening with Yalitza Aparicio

Nov 12, 4:30–5:30 PM
Alumnae Hall
Free and open to the public

Yalitza Aparicio, actor, teacher, and activist was nominated for an Academy Award for her work in the 2018 award-winning Mexican film Roma. The Newhouse Center invites Professors Irene Mata (Women and Gender Studies), and Codruta Morari (Cinema and Media Studies) to interview Ms. Aparacio about her work in Mexican cinema, her responses to overnight global fame, and her subsequent wide-ranging social justice activism. Screenings of Roma will be held prior to the event.

Born in 1993 in Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, Mexico, Ms. Aparicio, a primary school teacher, answered a call for Alfonso Cuarón’s highly stylized story of childhood, Roma. Since the day she was cast as a housekeeper in the role of Cleo, Ms. Aparicio has intentionally used her new platform to advocate for gender equality, indigenous rights, and labor rights for domestic workers. The first indigenous woman to appear on the cover of Vogue Mexico, Ms. Aparicio is also the first indigenous woman nominated for an Academy Award and the second Mexican woman ever nominated for the Oscar for Best Actress.

Doors to Alumnae Hall auditorium will open at 3:45pm. Seating is available on a first come, first served basis. 

Screenings of the film Roma: Thursday, November 7, 6:30-9 pm | Sunday, November 10, 1:30-4 pm | Collins Cinema

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, Women's and Gender Studies, and Cinema and Media Studies.

illustration of a seagull against a yellow background

“Stupid F*cking Bird”: A Contemporary Adaptation of Chekhov’s “The Seagull”

By Aaron Posner, Directed by Marta Rainer
Nov 14–Nov 17, Thu/Fri/Sat at 7 PM; Sun/Sat at 2 PM
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Ticket information appears below

Wellesley College Theatre presents Stupid F*cking Bird, a contemporary adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull.

An aspiring young director rampages against the art created by his mother’s generation. A young actress wrestles with an aging Hollywood star for the affections of a renowned novelist. And everyone discovers just how disappointing love, art, and growing up can be. In this irreverent, contemporary, and very funny remix of Chekhov’s The Seagull, Aaron Posner stages a timeless battle between young and old, past and present, in search of the true meaning of it all. Stupid F*cking Bird will tickle, tantalize, and incite you to consider how art, love, and revolution fuel your own pursuit of happiness.

Click here to make a reservation. For questions, please call the Box Office: 781-283-2000.

Photograph of an old building in Havana Cuba today with an overlay of a vintage postcard of the same building on top

Havana Revisited: An Architectural Heritage

Oct 7–Dec 20
Founders 300CC
Free and open to the public

Havana Revisited: An Architectural Heritage amasses one of the most complete historical and digital portfolios of Havana’s notable buildings. The traveling exhibition offers a rare view of an exclusive collection of early 20th-century postcards along with digital photos of Havana today, and presents architecture as a critical artistic and historical component of the city.

The exhibition consists primarily of framed pairs of images in which a reproduction of a picture postcard dating from 1900 to about 1930 is paired with a photograph of the same location as it appears now. The exhibition also includes two large maps and a video.

The main themes address the architecture of Havana and the restoration of its most significant buildings. Efforts to rehabilitate the city were given a tremendous boost when Old Havana and the city’s fortifications were declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1982.

The exhibition captures Havana’s architectural past and its evolving present with the utmost respect for the contributions of the original architects of the buildings and urban spaces, as well as the architectural historians and preservation architects who have worked diligently in recent years to restore and preserve the city’s rich heritage. Books will be available for sale.

The city of Havana traces its founding to November 16, 1519, when Spanish settlers observed a Catholic mass under a ceiba tree. The site stands on today’s Plaza de Armas, which is featured in the exhibition. On November 16, 2019, Havana will observe its 500th anniversary, providing a unique opportunity for the exhibition be displayed in conjunction with that celebration.

Curated by artist Cathryn Griffith DS ’88.

Opening talk, with Cathryn Griffith DS ’88, and reception: October 7, 4:30 PM

photo of Peter Norvig

How to Think About Machine Learning

A Talk by Peter Norvig, Director of Research at Google
Nov 5, 7 PM
Tishman Commons
Free and open to the public

Join us for an exciting discussion with Peter Norvig, a leader at Google for the past twenty years, and co-author of Artificial Intelligence, A Modern Approach, a leading text on antifical intelligence. Norvig will address the landscape of artificial intelligence and machine learning and their impact on all our lives.

A pre-lecture reception will be held at 7 PM, lecture to follow at 7:30 PM.

For more information, please contact:

PMetaxas@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Math Department, Computer Science Department, and Development Office

Democratic candidates take the stage for third primary debate

Democratic candidates take the stage for third primary debate.

November 2019 Democratic Debate: Faculty Discussion of Key Points and Takeaways

Nov 21, 12:45 PM
Knapp Atrium in Pendleton East
Free and open to the public

The next Democratic debate takes place on Wednesday, November 20. Who will emerge as the front runner? What will be the most debated points and policy stances? What predictions can be made for the upcoming election? The Knapp Social Science Center invites you to join Wellesley social science faculty for a debrief, conversation, and Q&A.

Pizza lunch will be provided.

For more information, please contact:

kssc@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Win McNamee/Getty Images

portrait of Nell Scovell against a dark grey backdrop

Nell Scovell

A Conversation With Nell Scovell

Oct 23, 4:30 PM
Pendleton Atrium
Free and open to the public

Nell Scovell, T.V. writer, producer, and director, in conversation with Lauren Holmes, Newhouse visiting professor of creative writing. In 2018, Scovell published a memoir titled Just the Funny Parts… And a Few Hard Truths About Sneaking into the Hollywood Boys’ Club, a juicy and scathingly funny insider look at how pop culture gets made.

For more than thirty years, writer, producer and director Nell Scovell worked behind the scenes of iconic TV shows, including The Simpsons, Late Night with David Letterman, Murphy Brown,NCIS, The Muppets, and Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, which she created and executive produced.

Generously supported by:

department of English and creative writing.

image of a hand holding an vintage photograph. Behind the hand is a wooden box filled with other vintage photographs of people

Still from Asmarina.

Innovations in Contemporary Italian Cinema

Nov 14–Nov 16, 6 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

Wellesley College offers the campus and local communities the chance to catch up on what is happening in contemporary Italian cinema. The three films scheduled, Asmarina (2015), Una storia senza nome/The Stolen Caravaggio (2018), and Sembra mio figlio/Just Like My Son (2018), are “hot off the press,” having been screened at the most recent international film festivals. Each film offers a different take on the multifaceted, in-flux social and political reality of Italy today.

Screenwriters and directors will be present to introduce the films and answer questions after the screenings. Experts on contemporary Italian cinema will take part in a roundtable discussion on Saturday before the screening of the third film, Sembra mio figlio/Just Like My Son (2018). 

Thursday, November 14th - Collins Cinema
I. Asmarina (2015) by Alan Maglio and Newhouse Center fellow Medhin Paolos

6:30pm: Introduction
7:00pm: Screening of the film
8:30pm: Discussion with director Medhin Paolos

Friday, November 15th - Collins Cinema
II. Una storia senza nome/The Stolen Caravaggio (2018) by Roberto Andò

6:30pm: Introduction
7:00pm: Screening of the film
8:30pm: Discussion with screenwriter Angelo Pasquini

Saturday, November 16th - Newhouse Center for the Humanities (Green Hall)  
4:30pm: Roundtable on contemporary Italian cinema
Speakers: Medhin Paolos (director of Asmarina and Newhouse Center fellow), Angelo Pasquini (screenwriter of Una storia senza nome/The Stolen Caravaggio), Antonio Falduto (President of Controluce) and Prof. Giorgio Bertellini (University of Michigan). Moderated by professors David Ward and Flavia Laviosa (Department of Italian Studies). 
5:30pm: Reception at Collins Cinema

III. Sembra mio figlio/Just Like My Son (2018) by Costanza Quatriglio - Collins Cinema
6:30pm: Introduction by director Costanza Quatriglio (via Skype)
7:00pm: Screening of the film
8:30pm: Discussion with Antonio Falduto

Accessibility and disability resources: accessibility@wellesley.edu.

 

For more information, please contact:

Jael Matos, jmatos@wellesley.edu, or Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Newhouse Center for the Humanites, Department of Italian Studies, Cinema and Media Studies, and the Committee on Lectures and Cultural Events.

Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky shakes hands with U.S. president Donald Trump

Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskiy and U.S. president Donald Trump meet during the U.N. General Assembly, on September 25, 2019, in New York City.

Why Ukraine?

Oct 28, 8 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

“The fact is Ukraine is an amazing place,” said President Trump in 2015. “I’ve known so many people over so many years in the Ukraine.” Why? Why and how did Ukraine move into the middle of U.S. politics? Why have so many political figures, from Hillary Clinton to Paul Manafort to Rudy Giuliani, involved themselves with Ukraine, Europe’s second largest country? The largest is Russia, which is itself a major player in this story. Professor Serhii Plokhii, a professor of Ukrainian history at Harvard, Director of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, and author of many books, including The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine, will address these timely questions. As he recently told the New York Times, Ukraine became a “battlefield” between Russia and the West after it became independent almost thirty years ago. “The front lines are always places that attract both heroes and villains who go there from world capitals to make a name, advance a career, make a fortune, etc.—and then carry back home legacies, memories and skeletons for their closets,” observed Professor Plokhii. He will share more observations with the Wellesley College community in his lecture.

Co-sponsored by the Russian Area Studies Program and the History Department.

For more information, please contact:

ntumarki@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

portrait of Mira Jacob

Mira Jacob

Mira Jacob

“Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations”
Oct 7, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Author Mira Jacob joins us for a discussion of her latest book, Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations.

Mira Jacob is the author and illustrator of Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations (2019). Her critically acclaimed novel The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing was a Barnes & Noble Discover New Writers pick, shortlisted for India’s Tata First Literature Award, and longlisted for the Brooklyn Literary Eagles Prize. Her writing and drawings have appeared in the New York Times, Electric Literature, Tin House, Literary Hub, Guernica, Vogue, the Telegraph, and BuzzFeed. She has a drawn column on Shondaland.

Image Credit:

In Kim

black and white image of a woman in car holding two children

Still from Roma.

Film Screening: “Roma”

Alfonso Cuarón’s award-winning 2018 film
Nov 7, 6:30 PM, Nov 10, 1:30 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

The award-winning 2018 film Roma is a semi-autobiographical take on director Alfonoso Cuarón’s upbringing in the Colonia Roma neighborhood of Mexico City. The film stars Yalitza Aparicio and Marina de Tavira and follows the life of a live-in housekeeper of a middle-class family.

Yalitza Aparicio will be on campus on November 12th for a public conversation with Wellesley professors Irene Mata and Codruta Morari.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, Women's and Gender Studies, and Cinema and Media Studies.

aerial view of Wellesley College campus

Sustainability at Wellesley: A Campus Update

Oct 17, 4 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

What is Wellesley doing to reduce the campus’s carbon footprint? Join us to hear about the exciting sustainability efforts happening all across Wellesley—including E2040, the Sustainability Committee, Environmental Studies, Facilities, EnAct, and more—and learn how you can get involved.

This event, which will be a panel presentation followed by an audience Q&A, is organized by the E2040 Working Group and Office of Facilities Management.

Photo of Chief Arvol Looking Horse

We Can Mend the Sacred Hoop Together

The Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Class of 1956 Distinguished Speaker Series on the North American West
Oct 28, 5 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

The women’s and gender studies and American studies departments are honored to welcome Chief Looking Horse back to campus as a distinguished guest who will help launch this exciting new lecture series named in his honor, the Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Class of 1956 Distinguished Speaker Series on the North American West. The newly formed Faculty Group on the North American West, sponsored by the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, is committed to reviving a longstanding interest in Native American history, culture, and social issues that was once prominent at Wellesley College.

Chief Arvol Looking Horse (Lakota Miniconjou) is the 19th generational Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf-Pipe and Bundle and the spiritual leader of the Lakota Sioux Nation—a responsibility he was given at age 12. He has been recognized internationally for his work protecting the environment and for founding World Peace and Prayer Day, and he has spoken many times on behalf of Native American people at the United Nations.

Paula Horne (Dakota Sisseton Wahpeton) has been involved in Native American rights for over 40 years. She is an activist, leader, and renowned singer who has brought her organizational skills to World Peace and Prayer Day since 1996.

For more information, please contact:

Professor Elena Creef, ecreef@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Speaker Series for the American West Program Gift

Image Credit:

Tim Yakaitis

Image of author Min Jin Lee

Min Jin Lee

A Reading and Conversation with Min Jin Lee

Sep 27, 2018, 5–6 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Pachinko, Min Jin Lee’s second novel, traces the arc of one family of resident Koreans of Japan, long the targets of discrimination. With an ear to the nuances of difference, Lee opens a window on a little-known minority group struggling to succeed on the far side of the Japanese economic miracle.

Following the reading, Professor Yu Jin Ko will lead a conversation with author Min Jin Lee.

Lee is a recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. Her 2017 novel, Pachinko, was a finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction, and selected as one of The New York Times 10 Best Books of 2017.

This event is sponsored by the English Department, the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, and the Korean Students Association (KSA).

Image Credit:

Elena Seibert

painting of adam and eve nude in the garden of eden, eve is handing adam an apple while a serpent looks on

Newhouse Faculty Series: Julie Walsh

Nicolas Malebranche, Eve, and the Fall of Eden
Oct 1, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Newhouse Center faculty fellow Julie Walsh discusses her latest research, which explores the question of whether women are intrinsically morally corrupt. Eve’s role in the fall of Eden might suggest that they are, but Walsh argues that what happened in the garden is much more complicated.

Walsh will discuss how the French priest and philosopher Nicolas Malebranche’s views on women are not a damning as they first appear by following the thread of his discussion of Eve, original sin, and the fall of Eden.

Julie Walsh is an assistant professor of philosophy at Wellesley College.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu

Daniel Mendelsohn

Daniel Mendelsohn

Daniel Mendelsohn

An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an Epic
Feb 9, 2018, 4:30 PM
Pendleton West 201
Free and open to the public

International bestselling author Daniel Mendelsohn discusses his book An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an Epic. A Q&A will follow the author’s reading.

Admission will be closed once the hall is filled. Limited seating available. Doors open at 4 PM.  

This event is sponsored in part by the Robert E. Garis and Arthur Gold Humanities Colloquium Fund.

Image Credit:

Matt Mendelsohn

image of the Indian and French flags

“Two Flags” Screening and Conversation with Pankaj Rishi Kumar

Oct 30, 6–9 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

A screening of Pankaj Rishi Kumar’s 2017 documentary Two Flags is followed by a Q&A with the director, moderated by Professors Liza Oliver and Anjali Prabhu. The film chronicles the life and politics of the formerly French town of Pondicherry in India. As the 4,600 Tamil French people belonging to the Tamil ethnic community gear up for the French presidential elections of 2017, the film explores the idea of identity, citizenship, and home in the post-colonial era. The film will be presented in Tamil and French with English subtitles.

Kumar graduated from the Film and Television Institute in Pune, India, in 1992, with a specialization in film editing. He produces, directs, shoots, and edits his own films under the banner of Kumar Talkies. His films have been screened at festivals all over the world, and he is the recipient of numerous grants as well as an Asia Society fellowship at Harvard Asia.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Newhouse Center for the Humanities and the Department of Art History

Hunter Vaughan smiling at camera

Hunter Vaughan

Hollywood’s Dirtiest Secret: The Hidden Environmental Costs of the Movies

A Lecture by Hunter Vaughan (University of Colorado Boulder)
Sep 26, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center Lounge
Free and open to the public

Hunter Vaughan's most recent book, Hollywood’s Dirtiest Secret: The Hidden Environmental Cost of the Movies (Columbia University Press, 2019), offers a new history of the movies from an environmental perspective, arguing that how we make and consume films has serious ecological consequences. In an era when many businesses have come under scrutiny for their environmental impact, the film industry has, for the most part, escaped criticism and regulation. Its practices are more diffuse, its final product less tangible, and Hollywood has adopted public-relations strategies that portray it as environmentally conscious.

Bringing together environmental humanities, science communication, and social ethics, Hollywood’s Dirtiest Secret is a pathbreaking consideration of the film industry’s environmental impact that examines how our cultural prioritization of spectacle has distracted us from its material consequences and natural-resource use. Vaughan examines the environmental effects of filmmaking from Hollywood classics to the digital era, considering how popular screen media shape and reflect our understanding of the natural world.

He recounts the production histories of major blockbusters—Gone with the WindSingin’ in the RainTwister, and Avatar—situating them in the contexts of the development of the film industry, popular environmentalism, and the proliferation of digital technologies. Emphasizing the materiality of media, Vaughan interweaves details of the hidden environmental consequences of specific filmmaking practices, from water use to server farms, within a larger critical portrait of social perceptions and valuations of the natural world.

Generously supported by:

The Newhouse Center for the Humanities, Cinema and Media Studies, the Paulsen Ecology of Place Initiative, Environmental Studies, and the French Department.

Marlon James

An Evening with Marlon James

Distinguished Writers at the Suzy Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Sep 19, 5–6:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Join us for a reading from Black Leopard, Red Wolf, followed by a discussion with the author, Marlon James. In 2015, James became the first Jamaican winner of the Man Booker Prize for A Brief History of Seven Killings, which also won a 2015 American Book Award and was listed as one of the New York Times’ top 10 books of 2014. Black Leopard, Red Wolf (2019) is a period piece influenced by African history and mythology.

Presented in collaboration with the English Department and Harambee House.

Image Credit:

Jeffrey Skemp

close up image of blue fabric with white dye pattern

Blue Worlds: Old and New Perspectives on Indigo

Sep 13, 3–5 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Four artists discuss how they have approached indigo—the plant, the dye, the medium, and the historical phenomenon—in their artistic practices. This panel is held in conjunction with the Davis Museum exhibition Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons (September 13 through December 15). Fatimah Tuggar, a 2019 Guggenheim Fellow, will discuss her multimedia commission for the Davis Museum, Deep Blue Wells, which engages with the indigo dye wells of Kano, Nigeria. Printer, publisher, and designer Ken Botnick will discuss his work adapting textile pattern techniques for paper and book pages. Boston-based artist Stephen Hamilton will share perspectives from his community-based projects. Textile artist Elin Noble will address indigo as one of the many natural dyes that she uses in her teaching and artistic practice.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, the Davis Museum, and the Paulson Ecology of Place Initiative.

Samuel Delany

An Evening with Samuel R. Delany

Distinguished Writers at the Suzy Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Feb 7, 5–6:15 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Join us for a conversation with award-winning author and critic Samuel Delany, whose works deal heavily in Afrofuturism, LGBTQ issues, and gender theory. Prior to retiring from academia in 2010, he taught literature and creative writing at Temple University. By the age of 27, he had won four Nebula Awards and two Hugo Awards. In 2002, he was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, and in 2013 he was named the 31st Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. The Lambda Literary Report has named him as one of the 50 people who has done the most to change society’s view of homosexuality in the last half-century.

For questions, please contact: Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu

Presented in collaboration with blackOUT.

Image Credit:

Michael S. Writz

water color painting of a blue whale against a blue background

The Ethical Choices of Whales

Bowheads, Hunters, and Mutual Adaptations in the Bering Strait 1848-1968
Nov 19, 4:30 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

Bowhead whales have been known by three distinct groups of hunters along the Bering Strait over the past two centuries: indigenous Yupik and Inupiaq whalers, capitalist commercial whalers, and communist industrial whalers. In this talk, Bathsheba Demuth looks at how bowhead whales became known through the conditions under which they were killed, and examines the cosmologies these three kinds of whaling practitioners composed around the animals they hunted. How were whales, particularly bowheads, imagined and treated? What kinds of emotional relationships were possible or considered ethical between humans and whales? Did whales make ethical judgments about their hunters? The talk closes by asking what including whale behavior in our analysis of human-whale interactions provokes in our historical understanding of nonhuman actions in human narratives of the past.

Professor Demuth is an environmental historian at Brown University specializing in the history of energy and past climates. She  She has lived in and studied Arctic communities across Eurasia and North America and is the author of Floating Coast: An Environmental History of the Bering Strait (2019).

This is the second event in the newly formed the Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Class of 1956 Distinguished Speaker Series on the North American West. The newly formed Faculty Group on the North American West, sponsored by the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, is committed to reviving a longstanding interest in Native American history, culture, and social issues that was once prominent here at Wellesley College.

For more information, please contact:

Professor Elena Creef, ecreef@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Speaker Series for the American West Program Gift

two people playing the piano together

Cathy Yang and Benyamin Nuss

“Fables”: Cathy Yang and Benyamin Nuss

Nov 15, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Fables is a project that combines the diverse colors and dream worlds of two distinct genres: classical piano music and video game scores. From the melancholic-expressive melodies of Maurice Ravel’s Ma mère l’Oye to the original harmonies of Nobuo Uematsu’s music for the Final Fantasy game series, the program is woven together by the immensely narrative nature of the music. Perhaps these two genres are not so different after all... Come and explore the worlds full of fantasy and imagination found in the piano works of French Impressionism and in the gaming and virtual worlds of Final Fantasy, Saga Frontier, and more!

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Marjorie Copland Baum fund, the Florence Jeup Ford ’22, Mary M. Crawford ’22, and Virginia Ford ’48 Artist in Residence Endowment Fund.

Heinavanker Estonian vocal ensemble

Heinavanker

Heinavanker, Estonian Vocal Ensemble

Oct 26, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

Heinavanker, an Estonian vocal ensemble under the direction of composer Margo Kõlar, is a convocation of a few of Estonia’s finest voices performing ageless music, ancient to modern. While rooted in liturgical chant and Renaissance polyphony, the group’s repertoire also makes room for vitalizing arrangements of early Estonian folk hymns and runic songs and sacred works by contemporary composers such as Arvo Pärt and Cyrillus Kreek. In Europe, Heinavanker has been a familiar presence on festival and concert stages and on radio for three decades, and the group has toured Europe, South America, and North America with performances and master classes. This company will be working closely with our choral program, directed by Lisa Graham, in its mini-residency and concert.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Marjorie Copland Baum Fund and the Florence Jeup Ford ’22, Mary M. Crawford ’22, and Virginia Ford ’48 Artist in Residence Endowment Fund.

Karen Dynan

Karen Dynan speaking at a Brookings Institution.

The 2019 Goldman Lecture in Economics

What's Wrong With Student Loans (And How to Fix it)
Oct 16, 4:15 PM
Tishman Commons
Free and open to the public

Karen Dynan, Harvard professor and former assistant secretary for economic policy and chief economist at the U.S. Treasury, delivers the 2019 Goldman Lecture in Economics: What's Wrong With Student Loans (And How to Fix it).

For more information, please contact:

Sheila Datz, sdatz@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Marshall I. Goldman Economics Fund

Image Credit:

Ralph Alswang for the Brookings Institution.

a woman standing in a field looking at an industrial building

María Magdalena Campos-Pons looking at factory Sergio Gonzales (formerly Tinguaro).

Newhouse Center Faculty Series: Nikki A. Greene

“Sugar makes me cry”: María Magdalena Campos-Pons and the Performance of Bittersweet Histories
Sep 23, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

In this presentation, Newhouse Center faculty fellow Nikki A. Greene discusses her ongoing research project on black feminist performance art, “Sugar makes me cry”: María Magdalena Campos-Pons and the Performance of Bittersweet Histories.

The performances of the Cuban-born artist María Magdalena Campos-Pons articulate her radical vision of the resiliency of enslaved Africans and their descendants, and the power of black women’s bodies in particular, in ways that seamlessly encompass the worlds of Afro-Cuba and the United States. Focusing on the exhibition Alchemy of the Soul: María Magdalena Campos-Pons at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass., in 2016, Greene will discuss how the performance of Remedios (Remedies), along with sculpture, installation, photography, and video, skillfully document the direct bittersweet histories, or historias agridulces, of Cuba and Massachusetts.

The sonic compositions of Campos-Pons’ co-collaborator, Neil Leonard, and selections from the rumba singer Rafael “El Niño” Navarro complement the gallery experience as a journey through Campos-Pons’s native Matanzas, a center of Afro-Cuban culture, to Salem, a key location for the triangular trade of enslaved people and of goods (sugar, rum, and cod fish, for example). The late Afro-Cuban singer Celia Cruz, who proclaimed “¡azúcar!” as a complex affirmation of her own blackness, makes for a productive comparison. Both Campos-Pons and Cruz chronicle—and embody—the narrative of sugar and rum production, of enslaved laborers and suffering, and, ultimately, death, by means of performance and visual and sound aesthetics.

Nikki A. Greene is an assistant professor of art at Wellesley College.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

Emily Fry/PEM

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Newhouse Center Faculty Series: Koichi Hagimoto

Samurai in the Land of the Gaucho: The Nikkei Experience and the Culture of Modernity in Argentina
Sep 10, 4:30 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

In this presentation, Newhouse Center faculty fellow Koichi Hagimoto discusses his latest research project, in which he explores the little-known history of Japanese immigration in Argentina. In so doing, he complicates the discourse of multiculturalism in the country.

Hagimoto’s emphasis on the Japanese in Argentina illustrates an alternative history of Japanese diaspora in Latin America, especially in comparison to Brazil and Peru, the two nations with the largest Japanese communities in the region. By comparing Argentina to its neighboring countries, Hagimoto challenges the temptation to homogenize the Japanese diasporic narrative or to simplify their experience through historical reductionism. He seeks to shed light on the ways in which the emerging Nikkei voices have both contributed to and resisted the grand narrative of Western modernity in Argentina.

Koichi Hagimoto is an associate professor of Spanish at Wellesley College.

 

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Newhouse Center for the Humanities

black and white still from Alice Guy Blaché’s “The Scarlet Woman”

Still from Alice Guy Blaché’s “The Scarlet Woman.”

Women Filmmakers at Wellesley

Be Natural: Rescuing Film Pioneer Alice Guy Blaché from Oblivion
Oct 10, 6:30 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

A screening of the film Be Natural: Rescuing Film Pioneer Alice Guy Blaché from Oblivion and discussion with Pamela Green, producer, writer, director, and editor.

Pamela B. Green is an American film producer and director known for her work in feature film titles and motion graphics.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Holmes, lholmes@wellesley.edu

Wellesley BlueJazz ensable

Wellesley College BlueJazz Ensemble.

Wellesley BlueJazz Combos and Strings Fall Concert

Paula Zeitlin, Director
Nov 22, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Afro-Cuban, Brazilian, Syrian, blues and funk, contemporary jazz and traditional standards, pop/rock, original arrangements and compositions, and more! The Wellesley BlueJazz Ensemble Program includes Wellesley BlueJazz Big Band and BlueJazz Combos. Students are immersed in a rich jazz repertoire, from classic to contemporary. Faculty-directed rehearsals encourage the development of fluency in jazz improvisation, and guest artists offer workshops and clinics. The ensembles perform throughout the year on campus and with other colleges in the Boston area.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Image of author Jabari Asim

Jabari Asim

2019 Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Lecture

Jabari Asim: Speaking for the Lions
Oct 31, 5:30 PM
Tishman Commons
Free and open to the public

The MLK Jr. Memorial lecture is an annual Wellesley event that pays tribute to the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. and his enormous contribution to advancing civil rights in the United State by leading and inspiring legislative, administrative, behavioral, and attitudinal changes.

The 2019 lecture will be given by Jabari Asim, associate professor of writing, literature, and publishing at Emerson College in Boston and executive editor of The Crisis, the NAACP’s flagship journal of politics, ideas, and culture. He is the author of six books for adults and nine for children. His most recent works are Only the Strong (2015), A Child's Introduction to African American History (2018), and We Can’t Breathe (2018).

For more information, please contact:

Lizette Rodriguez-Ponce, arodrig9@wellesley.edu

black and white image of Eve L. Ewing

Eve L. Ewing

The Diane Silvers Ravitch ’60 Lecture

Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side
Oct 17, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

In this talk, sociologist of education Eve L. Ewing presents her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago's South Side (2018). She will talk about the story of Chicago's 2013 mass public school closures—the largest wave of such closures in the nation's history.

The event will include a reading of excerpts from the book and a discussion of the lessons the book presents about history, segregation, racism, and the future of America’s public schools. The talk will be followed by a question and answer session.

Eve L. Ewing is an assistant professor in the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration. She is a qualitative sociologist of education whose work is centered around two primary questions: First, how do racism and other large-scale structures of social inequality impact the everyday lives and experiences of young people? Second, how can K–12 public school systems serve to interrupt or perpetuate these social problems, and what role can educators, policymakers, families, community members, and young people themselves play in understanding, acknowledging, and disrupting them?

Professor Ewing’s scholarship, community work, and classroom teaching are aimed at expanding the ways that urban school stakeholders, other researchers, and the broader public can be equipped to understand, respond to, and ultimately dismantle white supremacy and to make school systems liberatory institutions rather than oppressive ones. Her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2018. She also writes in other genres for broad audiences; she is the author of the poetry collections Electric Arches and 1919 and writes the Ironheart series for Marvel Comics. Her work has appeared in many venues, including Poetry Magazine, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Nation, The Washington Post, and The New Republic.

Professor Ewing is a faculty affiliate at the University of Chicago’s Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. Prior to joining SSA, Professor Ewing completed her doctoral studies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. While there, she served as editor and co-chair of the Harvard Educational Review. She then completed a Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Chicago. She also holds a Master of Education degree in education policy and management from Harvard University, a Master of Arts in Teaching degree in elementary education from Dominican University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Chicago.

For more information, please contact:

Soo Hong, shong@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Diane Silvers Ravitch Class of ’60 Lecture Series Gift.

portrait of Dr. Eibhear Walshe

Dr. Eibhear Walshe

Out of the Musical Closet: Writing Handel

Sep 30, 5:15 PM
Brackett Room, 2nd Floor Clapp Library
Free and open to the public

Was Handel gay? In his talk, Dr. Eibhear Walshe, University College Cork, will read from his book The Trumpet Shall Sound: A Novel, where he explores Handel's sexuality. A reception will follow the talk. 

Eibhear Walshe was born in Waterford, studied in Dublin, and now lives in Cork, where he lectures in the School of English at University College Cork and is Director of Creative Writing. He has published in the area of memoir, literary criticism and biography, and his books include Kate O’Brien: A Writing Life (2006), Oscar’s Shadow: Wilde and Ireland (2012), and A Different Story: The Writings of Colm Tóibín (2013). His childhood memoir, Cissie’s Abattoir (2009) was broadcast on RTE’s Book on One. His novel, The Diary of Mary Travers (2014) was shortlisted for the Kerry Group Novel of the Year Award in 2015 and longlisted for the 2016 International Dublin Literary Award. He was associate editor, with Catherine Marshall, of Modern Ireland in 100 Artworks (2016), edited by Fintan O’Toole and shortlisted for the Bord & Gais Energy Irish Book Award.

Generously supported by:

the Committee on Lectures and Cultural Events, the Music Department, the English Department, and the Writing Program.

members of Actors From The London Stage posing on a tree trunk

Actors From The London Stage present Twelfth Night

Oct 3, 7 PM, Oct 4, 7 PM, Oct 5, 7 PM
Diana Chapman Walsh Alumnae Hall
Free and open to the public

Twelfth Night is brought to life through the highest quality of Shakespearean performance. Actors From The London Stage are acclaimed for their talent, dexterity with language, and generosity of spirit.

No reservations are necessary.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2000

Generously supported by:

the Committee on Lectures and Cultural Events, under the auspices of the Frye/Martinson Fund, the Marjorie Copland Baum Fund, the Harman Cain Family Foundation, the Ruth Nagel Jones Fund, the Theatre Studies Program and the English Department.

Image Credit:

Robin Savage

low-angle picture of Galen Stone Tower with a yellow tree in foreground

The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs: Family and Friends Concert

Margaret Angelini, Director
Oct 18, 3:30–5 PM
Galen Stone Tower
Free and open to the public

Geert D’hollander, Carillonneur of Bok Tower in Lake Wales, leads the students in a master class. Watch as the students learn from one of the finest composer-performers in the carillon world. Galen Tower is open to community members with a Wellesley ID, everyone is welcome to listen to the simulcast of the concert in Founders 305.

The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the tradition of bell-ringing in Galen Stone Tower, which began when the carillon was first installed in 1931. 

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

abstract art piece of red string strung between black dots.

Yu-Wen Wu, Currents (detail), 2018, Graphite, sandpaper, red thread on duralar, 224” x 144”.

Prilla Smith Brackett Award: Artist’s Presentation and Reception

Sep 23, 6 PM
Davis Lobby
Free and open to the public

Join us as we celebrate Yu-Wen Wu, the recipient of the first biennial Prilla Smith Brackett Award. Funded by Prilla Smith Brackett ’64 and administered by the Davis Museum at Wellesley College, the Brackett Award honors an outstanding woman visual artist based in the Greater Boston area, whose work and exhibition record demonstrate extraordinary artistic vision, talent, and skill. Join the Brackett Award Jurors and the sponsor, Prilla Smith Brackett ’64, in celebrating the inaugural PSB Award winner!

Image Credit:

Courtesy of the artist.

a portrait of a person (Dr. Marisol LeBrón) smiling and looking at the camera

Policing Life and Death: Race, Violence, and Resistance in Puerto Rico

Oct 2, 4:30–6 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

Dr. Marisol LeBrón will give a lecture on her recent book, Policing Life and Death: Race, Violence, and Resistance in Puerto Rico (2019).

LeBrón is an assistant professor in the Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies at the University of Texas at Austin and 2019-20 faculty fellow at Harvard University’s Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History.

Co-sponsored by the Project of Public Leadership & Action and the Knapp Social Science Center.

For more information, please contact:

kssc@wellesley.edu

Portrait of Bradley Cooper

Bradley Campbell

Bradley Campbell: Dignity in an Era of Victimhood and Incivility

Oct 10, 4:30 PM
Alumnae Hall Ballroom
Free and open to the public

Does dignity still matter? In recent years, new rivals to dignity culture have emerged, and whether it is in our politics or at our universities, victimhood and incivility often seem to prevail. Dignity is not dead, though, and it can provide an alternative to recent moral trends—one that might lead to greater happiness, civility, and justice.

Bradley Campbell is a professor of sociology at California State University, Los Angeles. He is broadly interested in the study of moral conflict—clashes of right and wrong—and had written mostly about law, violence, and genocide until he began more recently to examine the conflicts on college campuses over microaggressions, safe spaces, trigger warnings, and free speech, which he will address in this lecture. He is the author of The Geometry of Genocide: A Study in Pure Sociology and coauthor (with Jason Manning of West Virginia University) of The Rise of Victimhood Culture: Microaggressions, Safe Spaces, and the New Culture Wars.

For more information, please contact:

Caryn Sowa, csowa@wellesley.edu

image of five women wearing black and making comedic gestures

Broad Comedy

Broad Comedy, led by comedian Katie Goodman

Oct 20, 7 PM
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Ticket information appears below

This feminist musical comedy is presented by the collective of award-winning performer/writer/directors who make up this company, founded and led by comedian Katie Goodman.

Since Broad Comedy first performed at Wellesley College more than a decade ago, the group has had an off-Broadway residency at SoHo Playhouse; appeared at 54 Below, Joe’s Pub, Caroline’s on Broadway; been named a “Top Ten Comedy Pick” at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland; and headlined fundraisers for Planned Parenthood, the ACLU, LGBTQ+ orgs, Democratic fundraisers, and women’s health organizations.

Katie Goodman—company director, author, keynote speaker, podcaster, improviser, HuffPo front-pager, and O, The Oprah Magazine contributor—was founder and director of the National Women’s Theatre Festival in Los Angeles and artistic director of the Philadelphia Women’s Theatre. It’s high time we have the group back to enjoy the fruits of their recent labor and the development of their feminist humor!

Reserve a free seat.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2000.

Generously supported by:

the Committee on Lectures and Cultural Events

Fatimah Tuggar's Robo Entertains. Image of a robot serving a group of people food at a dinner table

Fatimah Tuggar, Robo Entertains, 2001

Computer montage (inkjet on vinyl)

48 x 140 in. (121 x 357 cm)

 

Fatimah Tuggar Symposium: Time and Technology

Sep 13–Sep 14
Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons, this multiday symposium brings together scholars, artists, technologists, and Wellesley College students to present new critical perspectives on Fatimah Tuggar’s multimedia practice. The event features talks, tours, and interactive workshops organized over two days.

Multimedia artist Fatimah Tuggar (b. 1967, Kaduna, Nigeria) interrogates the systems underlying human interactions with both high-tech gadgets and handmade crafts. Now based in Kansas City, Mo., Tuggar is renowned for her work that layers binary code with artisanry, and her sculptures, photomontages, videos, and interactive works challenge romanticized notions of ancient traditions and recent inventions.

Friday, September 13

10 am: Exploring Augmented Reality | Knapp Center

Workshop with Jesse Berdinka, BrickSimple LLC, and Jordan Tynes, Wellesley LTS

1:30 pm: Tour of Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons with exhibition curator Amanda Gilvin | Davis Museum

3–5 pm: Panel: Blue Worlds: New and Old Perspectives on Indigo | Newhouse Center Lounge, Green Hall

Fatimah Tuggar, Ken Botnick, Stephen Hamilton, Elin Noble

 5–6 pm: Reception | Green Hall

 

Saturday, September 14

10 am: Dyeing with Plants | Paramecium Pond

Workshop with Paulson Ecology of Place Initiative and Wellesley College Botanic Gardens

1–4 pm: Indigo Dyeing Workshop with Elin Noble | Design studio, Pendleton West 102

This workshop is full, but you can sign up to be added to the waitlist.

2 pm Student-led drop-in tour | Davis Museum

Davis Summer Interns Elana Bridges ’20 and Maddy Allan-Rahill ’20 present a tour exploring technological themes in Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

the Paulson Ecology of Place Initiative, the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, the Wellesley College Botanic Gardens, the Knapp Media & Technology Center, and BrickSimple LLC.

Image Credit:

Artwork Credit: Courtesy of Fatimah Tuggar and BintaZarah Studios

Copyright

black and white portrait of a woman wearing glasses and looking at camera

Lauret Savoy

Trace: Memory, History, Race and the American Landscape

A Reading and Discussion by Lauret Savoy
Oct 25, 12:45–2 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Lauret Savoy, an author and professor of environmental studies and geology at Mount Holyoke College, joins the Newhouse Center and the Paulson Ecology of Place Initiative for a collaborative exploration of our land and our stories.

Her writing explores ties between American lands and the stories we tell of them. Her 2015 book Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape won the 2016 American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation and the 2017 ASLE Creative Writing Award. It was also a finalist for a PEN American Book Award.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu

Image Credit:

the Newhouse Center for the Humanities and the Paulson Ecology of Place Initiative.

A group of 5 people sitting in a gallery at the Davis Museum.

Mindful Meditation

Sep 18, Oct 16, Nov 20, Dec 18
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

Surround yourself with art, and experience present-moment awareness in this meditation session guided by Kotatsu John Bailes Roshi, the College’s Buddhist chaplain. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Davis’s permanent collections and special exhibitions and includes a guided meditation.

Meet in the Davis Lobby at 12:30 p.m.

Themes:

  • September 18: Wellesley’s Antioch Mosaic
  • October 16: Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons
  • November 20: Kanishka Raja: I and I
  • December 18: Abstract expressionism

Co-sponsored by the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Credit: Matsuyama Shiki Memorial Museum

A New Year’s Haiku Gathering at Shiki’s House, around 1898 or 1899

Keith Vincent: Masaoka Shiki’s New Haiku

Mar 18, 4:15 PM
Newhouse Center Lounge
Free and open to the public

Masaoka Shiki (1867-1902) was not just any haiku poet. He was the inventor of haiku. The roots of the form are centuries old, but it was Shiki who theorized and popularized it in its current form. But what, for Shiki, made a good haiku?

 

The roots of haiku are centuries old, but it was Masaoka Shiki who promoted the idea of the haiku as a form that could stand on its own rather than remain a part of a collective poetic production. If today’s readers tend to think of haiku, even those of earlier periods, as independent poems, this is the result of Shiki’s retrospective reinvention of the genre in the late nineteenth century.  It was also Shiki who popularized the term haiku itself, taking the "hai" of "haikai no renga" (comic linked verse) and adding it to "ku," or "poem."

 

But what made a good haiku for Shiki? In this talk, Professor Vincent will try to explain, with lots of examples.

 

Image Credit:

Matsuyama Shiki Memorial Museum

Image of a woman smiling at the camera.

2019 Domna Stanton Lecture: Zakiya Luna

How Reproductive Justice Will Save Abortion Rights
Sep 16, 5:30–7 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

The Department of Women’s and Gender Studies presents the annual Domna Stanton Lecture: How Reproductive Justice Will Save Abortion Rights, given by Zakiya Luna.

Zakiya Luna is Assistant Professor of Sociology at University of California, Santa Barbara courtesy appointment in Feminist Studies) and a faculty affiliate of the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law, which she helped co-found. She earned her Master’s of Social Work, and a PhD in Sociology and Women’s Studies from University of Michigan. Her research is in the areas of social change, law, health and inequality. Specifically, she is interested in& social movements, human rights and reproduction with an emphasis on the effects of intersecting inequalities within and across these sites.

This research was funded by multiple sources including the National Science Foundation. Her work has been published in Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Mobilization, Gender and Society, Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change and Societies without Borders: Social Science and Human Rights among others. She was a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow and Woodrow Wilson Career Enhancement Fellow. She is co-creator and co-editor of the University of California Press book series, Reproductive Justice: A New Vision for the 21st Century. She was a CoreAlign Generative Fellow (Blaze Cohort) and member of the Humane Resources Innovation Lab where her team examined how the reproductive justice movement organizations could be accountable to cultivating practices that recognize a person's whole self, in and beyond the workplaces, to help people thrive while sustaining the movement

For more information, please contact:

Elizabeth Tiro, etiro@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

Domna Stanton Lecture Series.

musicians dressed in white jumpsuits speaking into megaphonesl

The International Contemporary Ensemble

Midday Muse: Sound Listening

The International Contemporary Ensemble
Oct 3, 1 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

The International Contemporary Ensemble (I.C.E.) will create an interactive space to learn and perform Pauline Oliveros’ piece Sound Listening with the audience. Participants will work directly with the I.C.E members to create a space for interpretive listening, the discovery of new sounds, and a collective performance of this unique, multimedia work. The interactive performance requires no prior musical experience, just an open mind and the desire to make sounds with found objects on an amplified table.

More I.C.E. events at Wellesley.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Expeditions program of the New England Foundation for the Arts, made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional support from the six New England state arts agencies.  Also supported by the Marjorie Copland Baum Fund and the Florence Jeup Ford ’22, Mary M. Crawford ’22, and Virginia Ford ’48 Artist in Residence Endowment Fund.

black and white drawing of people waiting in line to enter a building

Miné Okubo, Waiting in lines, Tanforan Assembly Center, San Bruno, California (1942). Drawing (detail).

Before the Graphic Memoir

Female Sketchbooks and Visual Chronicles of Love and War
Oct 24, 4:30–6 PM
Newhouse Center for the Humanities
Free and open to the public

Yale University Professor Katie Trumpener discusses the prehistory of the graphic novel by examining artists, works, and genres ranging from alternative press cartoons to Japanese American internment memoirs to Native American ledger books and contemporary West German graphic memoirs.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Newhouse Center for the Humanities and the English Department.

Image Credit:

Courtesy of the Japanese American National Museum, gift of Miné Okubo Estate, 2007.62.

People talking at a Davis opening event

Fall Opening Celebration

Sep 12, 5:30 PM
Collins Cinema, Davis Museum Lobby and Galleries
Free and open to the public

Join the Davis Museum for the opening of our fall 2019 exhibitions, including five special installations that bring spectacular energy and creative artistic innovation to the Wellesley College campus. See the major exhibition, Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons, along with Kanishka Raja: I and I; Recent Acquisitions: New Photographs of Haley Morris-Cafiero and Habiba Nowrose; Hidden Histories: Revealing the Life of a Painting; Alexandra Smith: Seed to Harvest, the third “Windows Invitational” commission, as well as rotations that renew the presentations in our permanent collections galleries.

Artist Talk with Fatimah Tuggar | 5:30–6:30 pm | Collins Cinema

Join 2019 Guggenheim Fellow Fatimah Tuggar for a conversation with Ikem S. Okoye, associate professor of art history, University of Delaware, and Amanda Gilvin, Sonja Novak Koerner ’51 Senior Curator and Assistant Director of Curatorial Affairs, Davis Museum. The speakers will offer their perspectives on Deep Blue Wells, the new multimedia installation commissioned by the Davis that will be on view in Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons.

Opening Reception | 6:30–9 pm | Davis Lobby and Galleries

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2445

two women against black backdrop. One is smiling and looking at the camera, the other is singing

Core Ensemble: “Las Magnificas”

A chamber music theatre performance
Sep 24, 7:30 PM
Jewett Arts Center
Free and open to the public

In this chamber music theatre performance, focusing on the Cuban singer Celia Cruz and the Chilean singer Violeta Parra, Core Ensemble combines music with performance elements such as narrative and dance.

Las Magnificas, scored for cello, piano, percussion and singing actress, is based on the lives of two renowned Latin American singers: Celia Cruz, the Cuban “Queen of Salsa” and Chilean singer-songwriter Violeta Parra, “the Mother of Latin American Folk Music.”

Celia Cruz and Violeta Parra were extraordinary Latina artists. Singers deeply rooted in the tradition of their own country’s musical history, both were iconic figures in their respective countries, yet history intervened in their artistic and personal lives. Both used their voices as instruments of change and resistance, in the midst of political turmoil in their countries.

Las Magnificas was created by award-winning Chilean-American poet Marjorie Agosin. Agosin has gained notability for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. The United Nations has honored her for her work on human rights. The evening-length work is filled with music popularized by Cruz and Parra: Tu Voz, Gracias a la Vida, La Vida es un Carnaval and Volver a los 17 as well as instrumental music by other Latin American Composers such as Ernesto Lecuona, Eduardo Sanchez de Fuentes, Victor Jara, and Tania Leon. The narrative illuminates the social and political struggles and triumphs of the two artists.

Founded in 1993, Core Ensemble has earned acclaim for developing a new genre of chamber music theatre works, as well as commissioning and performing contemporary chamber music. Core Ensemble maintains a deep commitment to reaching the widest possible range of audiences demographically and geographically, in formats ranging from formal performance to informal lecture and educational residency programs.

Core Ensemble has commissioned many of today’s finest composers for new works featuring the unique instrumental combination of cello, piano, and percussion, many funded by the most prestigious commissioning programs in the United States. CD recordings have been released on the New World, Albany, and Centaur labels.

For more information, please contact:

Jael Matos, jmatos@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the CLCE, International Friends of Chile Commission on Human Rights, the Newhouse Center, and the Wellesley College Department of Music, Theatre Studies program, and Writing Program,

Image Credit:

Michael Parola

a group of Wellesley theater students smiling and laughing together

Theatre Studies 2019 Showcase

Dec 16, 7 PM
Ruth Nagel Jones Theatre
Free and open to the public

See the combined efforts of students from many of the Theatre Studies fall courses, highlighting the collaborative work of student actors, playwrights, and designers.

For more information, please contact:

Kate Svirsky 781-283-2678

Generously supported by:

the Ruth Nagel Jones Fund.

image from the gallery exhibition of Black Spaces Matter

Gallery Image, Black Spaces Matter: Exploring the Aesthetics and Architectonics of an Abolitionist Neighborhood, McCormick Gallery, Boston Architectural College, November, 2017 to January 2018

The Harry Halverson Lecture on American Architecture: Pamela Karimi

Black Spaces Matter: Learning from an Abolitionist Neighborhood
Nov 5, 5 PM
Jewett Arts Center 450
Free and open to the public

Architect and architectural historian Pamela Karimi, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, deploys a teaching methodology that engages with the university's surrounding communities. Using the historic architecture of New Bedford, Mass. as a springboard, Karimi considers issues vital for the sustainable renewal of the built environment in the context of the American Post-industrial city. A key contribution in this vein is the Black Spaces Matter traveling exhibition that she organized in collaboration with local experts, students, and residents in order to showcase the extraordinary history of New Bedford in the abolitionist movement. This talk presents some of these activities.

Pamela Karimi is an architect and an architectural historian. Her work spans two fields of inquiry. The first is architecture and visual culture of the modern Middle East. The second is design and sustainability in North America. She is the author of Domesticity and Consumer Culture in Iran: Interior Revolutions of the Modern Era and co-editor of Images of the Child and Childhood in Modern Muslim Contexts, Reinventing the American Post-Industrial City & The Destruction of Cultural Heritage in the Middle East: From Napoleon to ISIS. Her major curatorial projects include Urban Renewal and Creative Economy in Massachusetts Gateway Cities at the New Bedford Art Museum, Black Spaces Matter at the BAC’s McCormick Gallery and Stateless: Artists Respond to the Refugee Crisis in the University Art Gallery at UMass Dartmouth. In 2018 she received the Manning Prize for Excellence in Teaching. Karimi is the co-founder of Aggregate Architectural History Collaborative.

Generously supported by:

The Harry Halverson Lecture Fund

Image Credit:

Pamela Karimi

image of a thatched roof structure reflecting onto vivid blue water with a mirror image of a suburban house

L: Fatimah Tuggar, Home’s Horizons 1, 2019. Computer montage diptych (inkjet on vinyl) 40 x 23 in., 40 x 23 in.

R: Fatimah Tuggar, Home’s Horizons 2, 2019. Computer montage diptych (inkjet on vinyl) 40 x 23 in., 40 x 23 in.

Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons

Sep 13–Dec 15
Camilla Chandler and Dorothy Buffum Chandler Gallery, Marjorie and Gerald Bronfman Gallery
Ticket information appears below

The Davis Museum at Wellesley College presents Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons, a major solo exhibition that investigates history, technology, and the home. A multimedia artist born in Nigeria in 1967 and currently based in Kansas City, Mo., Tuggar has taught and exhibited around the world. Curated by Amanda Gilvin, Sonja Novak Koerner ’51 Senior Curator and Assistant Director of Curatorial Affairs at the Davis, this exhibition features works from 1995 to 2019—in sculpture, photomontage, video, and augmented reality (AR)—and highlights Tuggar’s interrogation of the systems underlying human interactions with both high-tech gadgets and handmade crafts. It also features Deep Blue Wells, a new interactive, multimedia installation commissioned by the Davis that engages with the indigo dye wells of Kano, Nigeria, and pushes at the limits of current digital technologies while honoring expert artisanal work. The installation was developed in collaboration with the software development firm BrickSimple LLC.

Tuggar is renowned for her work that layers binary code with artisanry; her sculptures, photomontages, videos, and interactive works challenge romanticized notions of ancient traditions and recent inventions. She seeks to promote social justice by implicating everyone in these systems, while playfully proposing new ways of seeing and making.

Please note: Tickets are required for entry to this special exhibition. General admission, $12; Wellesley College alumnae, $6. Free entry for all students with I.D., Wellesley College faculty and staff, Friends of Art members, and Durant Society members. For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit thedavis.org.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2445

Generously supported by:

the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, with additional support from BrickSimple LLC. Generous support for the exhibition and publication was provided by Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis, the Kathryn Wasserman Davis ’28 Fund for World Cultures and Leadership, the Mildred Cooper Glimcher ’61 Endowed Fund, the E. Franklin Robbins Art Museum Fund, the Davis Museum and Cultural Center Endowed Fund, the Anonymous ’70 Endowed Davis Museum Program Fund, the Judith Blough Wentz ’57 Museum Programs Fund, and the Constance Rhind Robey ’81 Fund for Museum Exhibitions.

Image Credit:

Courtesy of Fatimah Tuggar and BintaZarah Studios

two photos next to each other: one of a person covered in pink flowers, the other are people standing on a beach

L: Habiba Nowrose, Concealed, 2017, inkjet print, 31 ½ in. x 20 ⅞ in. (80 cm x 53 cm)

R: Haley Morris-Cafiero, Sunscreen, 2015, digital print, 24 in. x 24 in.

Recent Acquisitions: New Photographs of Haley Morris-Cafiero and Habiba Nowrose

Sep 13–Nov 15
Friends of Art Gallery
Free and open to the public

Two recent acquisitions of work by up-and-coming women photographers, Haley Morris-Cafiero and Habiba Nowrose, embrace the performative aspects of portraiture, one of photography’s oldest genres, to confront societal expectations around body image and identity.

The institutionalization and historicization of photography began with rigor in the 1970s. Since then, the Davis Museum has stewarded and grown a robust photography collection that represents a range of approaches, uses, and interpretations of the medium. From the vernacular to the iconic, from serial projects to singular works, recent acquisitions continue to expand the geographic, cultural, and technical scope of the museum’s photographic holdings.

Haley Morris-Cafiero (b. 1976, Memphis, Tenn.) holds an MFA from the University of Arizona and is a lecturer in photography at the Belfast School of Art at Ulster University, Ireland. She was nominated for a Prix Pictet in 2014 and was a 2016 Fulbright finalist. She has had solo exhibitions at UPI Gallery in New York, the University of Dayton, and the Centre de la Photographie Genève in Geneva, Switzerland.

Habiba Nowrose (b. 1989, Dhaka, Bangladesh) holds an MS in women’s and gender studies from the University of Dhaka and is currently enrolled in the Professional Program on Photography at the Pathshala South Asian Media Institute. Her series, Concealed, was a finalist for the 2018 Invisible Photographers Awards.  

Curated by Carrie Cushman, Linda Wyatt Gruber ’66 Curatorial Fellow in Photography.

 

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Linda Wyatt Gruber ’66.

a variety of print frames leaning against a wall

Fourth Annual Davis Holiday Frame and Print Sale

Dec 3–Dec 15, 11 AM–5 PM
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

An annual Davis tradition! Stop by the Davis Museum lobby to find a cool frame for a photograph, or pick up a print or poster for holiday gift-giving. We will also have a sale on art books and exhibition catalogues, which make perfect gifts. Prints from $5 and up; frames and catalogues from $10 and up. Come early for best selection, while supplies last.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

colorful artwork of geometric abstract shapes

Kanishka Raja, I and I (Translate); SW2, 2015-16. Handwoven cotton thread, hand embroidered silk, UV-cured, solvent-based inks on linen. 74 x 74 in.

Kanishka Raja Celebration

Nov 22, 6–8 PM
Davis Lobby & Galleries
Free and open to the public

Join exhibition co-curators Laylah Ali and Lisa Fischman, along with friends, family, and fans of the artist, in celebrating the life and work of Kanishka Raja, whose series I and I is installed in two galleries on L2.

Image Credit:

Courtesy of the Artist's Estate and Juli Raja, © Kanishka Raja

People with children in strollers in the Davis museum

Stroller Tours

Oct 9, Nov 13, Dec 11
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

Spend an art-filled morning at the Davis strolling the galleries during this free guided tour—a special opportunity for families open before normal hours. Designed for art lovers and their little ones. Join us for a different theme on the second Wednesday of each month from 10:15-11 a.m.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Fatimah Tuggar's artwork Lady and the Maid.

Fatimah Tuggar, Lady and the Maid, 2000

Computer montage (inkjet on vinyl)

108 x 45 in. (274 x 115 cm)

Artist Skype Talk Series: Fatimah Tuggar

Nov 19, 10 AM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

The capstone in a series of three conversations via Skype between Davis curators and artists Haley Morris-Cafiero, Habiba Nowrose, and Fatimah Tuggar.

Multimedia artist Fatimah Tuggar (b. 1967, Kaduna, Nigeria) will discuss her current exhibition, Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons, with a focus on Deep Blue Wells, a commission by the Davis Museum. The installation engages with the indigo dye wells of Kano, Nigeria, to transform widely held ideas about art, history, and technology.

Image Credit:

Courtesy of Fatimah Tuggar and BintaZarah Studios

 
Unknown Venetian artist painting of the Holy Family with St. Catherine, St. Sebastian, and a Donor, 16th century

Unknown Venetian Artist, Holy Family with St. Catherine, St. Sebastian, and a Donor, 16th century, Oil on cradled panel, 49 3/8 in. x 65 3/4 in. (125.4 cm x 167 cm)

Davis Discoveries Fall 2019 Symposium: A Sacra Conversazione

Nov 15, 2–4:30 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

Organized in conjunction with the recent gift of a 16th-century Venetian painting, Holy Family with St. Catherine, St. Sebastian, and a Patron, this symposium brings together a conservator, a curator, and a recent Wellesley graduate to offer new insights on the painting.

As a complement to the exhibition Hidden Histories: Revealing the Life of a Painting, presentations will be given by Lydia Vagts, conservator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, who performed technical analysis on the painting; Frederick Ilchman, chair, art of Europe, and Mrs. Russell W. Baker Curator of Paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, an expert on 16th-century Venetian painting; and Katherine Davies ’19, the Eleanor P. DeLorme Museum Intern for the summer of 2019 at the Davis and co-curator of the exhibition.

Generously supported by:

Gift of Peter H. and Joan Macy Kaskell (Class of 1953) 2017.184

a group of people viewing art at the Davis Museum

Educator Workshop

Nov 6, 3:30–5 PM
Davis Lobby and Galleries
Ticket information appears below

The Davis welcomes local K-12 educators for a workshop focused on utilizing resources from our permanent collections and the special exhibition, Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons. Explore how to connect the themes and works of art on view with your classroom curricula.

Participation is free, but advance registration is required. Please e-mail Arthurina Fears at afears@wellesley.edu to reserve your space.

For more information, please contact:

Arthurina Fears, afears@wellesley.edu.

Generously supported by:

the Palley Endowment Fund for Davis Museum Outreach Programs.

Fatimah Tuggar's artwork: a record player with folk art on the record

Fatimah Tuggar, Fai-Fain Gramophone, 2010

Record player, raffia disks with labels, music by Barmani Choge, entertainment center

53 x 32 1/2 x 24 in. (134.6 x 82.5 x 70 cm)

 

Gallery Talk: Amanda Gilvin: Fatimah Tuggar

Nov 5, 4 PM
Davis Museum
Free and open to the public

Join Amanda Gilvin, Sonja Novak Koerner '51 Senior Curator and Assistant Director of Curatorial Affairs, in examining Fatimah Tuggar’s work through a discussion of Home’s Horizons, a major solo exhibition that investigates history, technology, and the home. Free and open to the public.

Multimedia artist Fatimah Tuggar (b. 1967, Kaduna, Nigeria) interrogates the systems underlying human interactions with both high-tech gadgets and handmade crafts. Now based in Kansas City, Mo., Tuggar is renowned for her work that layers binary code with artisanry; her sculptures, photomontages, videos, and interactive works challenge romanticized notions of ancient traditions and recent inventions.

 

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, with additional support from BrickSimple LLC. Generous support for the exhibition and publication was provided by Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis, Kathryn Wasserman Davis '28 Fund for World Cultures and Leadership, Mildred Cooper Glimcher '61 Endowed Fund, E. Franklin Robbins Art Museum Fund, Davis Museum and Cultural Center Endowed Fund, Anonymous '70 Endowed Davis Museum Program Fund, Judith Blough Wentz '57 Museum Programs Fund, and Constance Rhind Robey '81 Fund for Museum Exhibitions.

Image Credit:

Artwork Credit: Courtesy of Fatimah Tuggar and BintaZarah Studios

children with art supplies

Family Day: Dream Home

Oct 26, 11 AM–3 PM
Davis Lobby, Plaza, and Galleries
Free and open to the public

During this free, family-friendly event, explore technology through hands-on activities. Join us for a treasure hunt in the galleries; engage in hands-on art activities, including photomontage and mini dyeing projects; take an interactive family tour of the special exhibition Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons; meet CGI (computer-generated imagery) students; and join us for robot story time (1:30-2pm), where we’ll listen to stories and sing songs with the Wellesley Free Library NAO robot!

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

a person's face covered in pink daisies against a pink floral background

Habiba Nowrose, Concealed, 2017, inkjet print, 31 ½ in. x 20 ⅞ in. (80 cm x 53 cm)

Artist Skype Talk Series: Habiba Nowrose

Oct 18, 11 AM–12 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

Second in a series of three conversations via Skype between Davis curators and artists Haley Morris-Cafiero, Habiba Nowrose, and Fatimah Tuggar.

Habiba Nowrose (b. 1989, Dhaka, Bangladesh) holds an MS in women’s and gender studies from the University of Dhaka and is currently enrolled in the Professional Program on Photography at the Pathshala South Asian Media Institute. Her series, Concealed, was a finalist for the 2018 Invisible Photographers Awards.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Image Credit:

Museum purchase with funds given through the generosity of Linda Wyatt Gruber (Class of 1966), 2018.291

People with children in strollers in the Davis museum

Stroller and Story Time Saturday

Oct 12, 11 AM–12 PM
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

Families are invited to spend an art-filled morning at the Davis strolling the galleries with their little ones during a free guided tour of Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons from 11 to 11:30 am and then join a special guest from the Wellesley Free Library from 11:30 am to noon for books and songs!

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

people on the beach

Haley Morris-Cafiero, Sunscreen, 2015, digital print, 24 in. x 24 in.

Artist Skype Talk Series: Haley Morris-Cafiero

Oct 8, 2–3 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

The first in a series of three conversations via Skype between Davis curators and artists Haley Morris-Cafiero, Habiba Nowrose, and Fatimah Tuggar.

Haley Morris-Cafiero (b. 1976, Memphis, Tenn.) holds an MFA from the University of Arizona and is a lecturer in photography at the Belfast School of Art at Ulster University, Ireland. She was nominated for a Prix Pictet in 2014 and was a 2016 Fulbright finalist. She has had solo exhibitions at UPI Gallery in New York, the University of Dayton, and at the Centre de la Photographie Genève in Geneva, Switzerland

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Image Credit:

Museum purchase with funds given through the generosity of Linda Wyatt Gruber (Class of 1966), E.2019.10.3

image of art hanging in Davis gallery

Making Memories

Accessible Art Program for Adults Living with Alzheimer’s and Other Dementias
Sep 27, 11 AM, Oct 25, 11 AM, Nov 22, 11 AM
Davis Museum Lobby
Ticket information appears below

Making Memories, an accessible arts program for adults living with early Alzheimer’s and other dementias and their care partners, provides a guided exploration of our permanent collections with specially trained museum staff and student guides.

This free program offers opportunities to enjoy conversation, works of art, and new experiences at the Davis. Participation is free, but advance registration is required as space is limited. In addition, private groups are encouraged to book a custom program. For more information or to pre-register, email Arthurina Fears, curator of museum education and programs, at afears@wellesley.edu.

For more information, please contact:

Arthurina Fears, curator of museum education and programs, afears@wellesley.edu.

student wearing a Davis Museum t-shirt while standing in a gallery

Drop-in Public Tours

Sep 14–Dec 7, 2 PM
Davis Museum Lobby
Free and open to the public

Designed by Wellesley students representing a range of academic majors, these thematic tours of special exhibitions and permanent collections led by a student guide are free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. No tours on October 12 and November 30. For a full schedule of tours, please visit www.theDavis.org.

Generously supported by:

the Elizabeth Bein Keto ’48 Endowed Memorial Art Fund.

Kanishka Raja's painting I and I. Multi-colored green and blue abstract painting.

Kanishka Raja, I and I (Translate); SW1, 2015-16 

Handwoven cotton thread, hand embroidered silk, UV-cured, solvent-based inks on linen

74 x 76.5 in

 

Kanishka Raja: I and I

Sep 13–Dec 15
Joan Levine Freedman ’57 and Richard I. Freedman Gallery
Free and open to the public

Painter Kanishka Raja transforms a hybrid inheritance—the post-colonial confluences of an urban Indian childhood, familial roots in textile manufacture and clothing design, liberal arts and studio education in the US, bi-national footing in New York and Kolkata—into gorgeously patterned and painted work that both reflects and exceeds its foundational elements. As the artist put it, his practice “explores the intersection of representation, craft, technology, and the gaps that occur in the transmission of information.” At once conceptually heady and aesthetically alluring, Raja’s series, I and I, combines traditional painting with woven, scanned, printed, embroidered, and reproduced counterparts. Strategies of variation, repetition, reversal, and mirroring converge in “composite fields that tap into oppositions—the technological versus the handmade, original versus reproduction, and neutral versus contested.”

Born in Calcutta in 1969, Kanishka Raja lived and worked in New York and Kolkata until his death in 2018. He received a BA from Hampshire College, an MFA from the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University, and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. 

Raja’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally with solo presentations at the Barbara Walters Gallery at Sarah Lawrence College, the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery at the University of the Arts, Philadelphia, Greenberg van Doren, Jack Tilton Gallery, and Envoy, in New York, and Galerie Mirchandani + Steinrücke, Mumbai; and group exhibitions at the Asia Society Museum, NY, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, the Dorsky Museum of Art at SUNY, New Paltz, ICA Philadelphia, and the Rose Art Museum, among others.

Raja received a Painters and Sculptors Grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation and the ICA Artists’ Prize from the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; and was awarded a Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC) Workspace Residency, a Fellowship at the Civitella Ranieri Center in Umbertide, Italy, and an NEA funded residency at the International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP), New York. In 2016, he completed work on a major Percent for Art commission from the Department of Cultural Affairs, New York City for a permanent public artwork.

Co-curated by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro '37 Director of the Davis Museum, with Laylah Ali, the Francis Christopher Oakley Third Century Professor of Art at Williams College.

Generously supported by:

the Wellesley College Friends of Art at the Davis, the Alice Gertrude Spink Art Fund (1963), the June Feinberg Stayman '48 Art Fund, Davis Museum Endowed Fund for International Cultural Programs, The Helyn MacLean Endowed Program Fund for Contemporary and South Asian Art, and The Mildred Cooper Glimcher '61 Endowed Fund. The catalogue has been realized with additional funds generously provided by Prateek and Priyanka Raja, Jane DeBevoise, Jane Penner, and Juli Raja.

Image Credit:

Courtesy of the Artist's Estate and Juli Raja, © Kanishka Raja,

Photo: Steve Briggs

very old painting of a shirtless man (Saint Sebastian) pierced with arrows while people look on.

Unknown Venetian Artist, Holy Family with St. Catherine, St. Sebastian, and a Donor, 16th century, Oil on cradled panel, 49 3/8 in. x 65 3/4 in. (125.4 cm x 167 cm), Gift of Peter H. and Joan Macy Kaskell (Class of 1953) 2017.184.

Hidden Histories: Revealing the Life of a Painting

Sep 13–Dec 15
Robert and Claire Freedman Lober Viewing Alcove
Free and open to the public

Hidden Histories: Revealing the Life of a Painting examines a 16th-century Venetian Sacra Conversazione, recently donated to the Davis Museum. This Holy Family with St. Catherine, St. Sebastian, and a donor was previously attributed to Giorgione, and exists in multiple versions, including one at the Musée du Louvre, Paris. Several important details in the Davis’s painting, such as the donor figure and the background landscape, differ from the other nearly identical works. Restorations, like the head of St. Joseph, are clearly visible on the canvas. The history of visual change evident in this painting spans centuries and now raises many questions: Who made it? How many artists or conservators worked on the painting? Why are there multiple copies, and why is this work different from the others? Hidden Histories explores this Sacra Conversazione painting through recent conservation, technical analysis, and an art historical lens to uncover a wealth of new information and highlight the unknown.

Co-curated by Alicia LaTores, Friends of Art Curatorial Research Assistant, and Katherine Davies ’19, the summer 2019 Eleanor P. DeLorme Museum Intern.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Peter H. Kaskell and Joan Macy Kaskell ’53.

Archival image of Dr. Harriett Alleyne Rice (Class of 1887), surrounded by purple geometric pattern and stylized shapes

Windows Invitational

Alexandria Smith: Seed to Harvest
Sep 1–Aug 31, 2020
Davis Museum Lobby Windows
Free and open to the public

The Windows Invitational engages artists in transforming the dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows that articulate the lobby and courtyard plaza of our signature Rafael Moneo building. The third commission in the series is by Alexandria Smith, head of painting at the Royal College of Art in London, formerly assistant professor of painting at Wellesley College.

Smith’s Seed to Harvest foregrounds portraits of Wellesley’s first African American graduates and borrows its title from the “Patternist” series of novels by Octavia Butler, stories that explore themes of science fiction, humanity, and the ethical and unethical uses of power. Rendering with hand-drawn and computer techniques, Smith embellishes original photographic portraits of five alumnae: Dr. Harriett Alleyne Rice (Class of 1887), Ethel M. Caution-Davis (Class of 1912), Katherine Naomi Robinson (Class of 1922), Clarissa Scott Delany (Class of 1923), and Jane Bolin (Class of 1928). She adds symbolic elements derived from her own visual vocabulary and from quilt patterns used to convey messages along the Underground Railroad (there were two stops in the town of Wellesley) to create the unique crests that adorn each with an honorific flourish.

Curated by Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director.

For more information, please contact:

781-283-2051

Generously supported by:

Wellesley’s Friends of Art at the Davis

Collegium Musicum ensemble musicians and singers performing

Collegium Musicum (Early Music Ensemble)

Andrew Arceci, Director
Nov 12, 7:30 PM
Sargent Music Salon (PNW-101)
Free and open to the public

The Collegium Musicum is an ensemble of singers and instrumentalists open to Wellesley College students, faculty, staff, and the local community. The Collegium specializes in the performance of Western music from the Middle Ages to the early 19th century. The Collegium is often joined by faculty and outside guest artists who enrich the ensemble for special projects.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Galen Stone Tower

The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs: Holiday Concert

Margaret Angelini, Director
Dec 8, 12–2 PM
Galen Stone Tower
Free and open to the public

Ring in the most wonderful time of year with music, decorations, and sweets. Listen from the Academic Quad or chapel lawn as the Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the tradition of bell-ringing in Galen Stone Tower, which began when the carillon was first installed in 1931. Galen Tower is open to community members with Wellesley College ID.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Yanvalou Drum and dance ensemble

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble

Kera Washington, Director
Dec 7, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Yanvalou Drum and Dance Ensemble performs the folkloric music and dance of Africa, as it exists today throughout Africa and the African Diaspora, particularly in Haiti, Ghana, Zimbabwe, and Brazil.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Christmas Vespers in Houghton Chapel

Christmas Vespers

The Wellesley College Choral Program Directed by Lisa Graham, Evelyn Barry Director of the Choral Program
Dec 8, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

The Choral Music Program and the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life present an evening of candlelight, music, readings, and carols. A longstanding Wellesley tradition, Christmas Vespers heralds the arrival of the holiday season in the beautiful setting of Houghton Chapel.

For more information, please contact:

ORSL@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life and the Music Department.

Wellesley College BlueJazz Ensemble

Wellesley College BlueJazz Ensemble.

Wellesley BlueJazz Big Band Fall Concert

Cercie Miller, Director
Dec 6, 7:30 PM
Jewett Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Celebrate jazz this fall with the Wellesley BlueJazz Big Band, featuring the music of Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and more! The Wellesley BlueJazz Big band performs new and classic jazz repertoire with a fresh take, featuring dynamic ensemble passages, big band shouts, and spirited soloists. Directed by saxophonist Cercie Miller. Refreshments to follow.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

performers in the Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra

Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra Fall Concert

Neal Hampton, Conductor
Nov 23, 7:30 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

This program will feature Mahler Symphony No. 4 in G Major. Kristen Watson, Soprano. The Brandeis-Wellesley Orchestra is composed of students, faculty, staff, and associates of Wellesley College and Brandeis University. Uniting the standards of excellence associated with Wellesley and Brandeis, the orchestra brings inspiring performances of the great orchestral literature—past and present—to a new generation of musicians and audiences.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Choral program performance

Wellesley College Choral Program: The Dober Memorial Concert

Lisa Graham, Conductor, Steven Sametz, Conductor, and Erica Johnson, organ
Nov 3, 1 PM
Houghton Memorial Chapel
Free and open to the public

Featuring the Wellesley College Choir and Chamber Singers, with guest choir Lehigh University Glee Club. Joint works include Gabriel Fauré's beautiful Requiem and Rejoice in the Lamb by Benjamin Britten. The highly acclaimed Wellesley College Choral program promotes the great art of ensemble singing while building community and joy in performance.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

Galen Stone Tower

The Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs: Halloween Concert

Margaret Angelini, Director
Oct 26, 1–3 PM
Academic Quad
Free and open to the public

Join us for a special Halloween concert with costumes, candy, and spooky music! Listen from the academic quad or the chapel lawn as the Wellesley College Guild of Carillonneurs carries on the tradition of bell-ringing in Galen Stone Tower, which began when the carillon was first installed in 1931.

For more information, please contact:

concerts@wellesley.edu

behind the scenes view of a video camera on set

Women Filmmakers at Wellesley: The Role of the Producer

What do Film Producers do?
Sep 24, 4:15 PM
Founders 120
Free and open to the public

In this interactive presentation, independent film producer Linda Reisman will discuss the roles of the creative producer, line producer, and executive producer in film making. She will also explain the process and work that is involved from the development of a script to the film’s distribution.

Reception with refreshments served.

Linda Reisman is an independent film producer and senior distinguished producer-in-residence in the Department of Visual & Media at Emerson College. Her most recent film, Leave No Trace, premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival and internationally in the Directors Fortnight section of the Cannes Film Festival. Other notable work include The Danish Girl (2015) and Affliction (1997).

For more information, please contact:

Margaret Cezair-Thompson, mcezaire@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

The English and Creative Writing Department, co-sponsored by the CLCE.

A close up portrait of a caucasian man looking at the camera

James Simpson

James Simpson: Iconoclasm and the Cultural Revolution

Dec 4, 4:30 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

A look at the history of Anglo-American iconoclasm and contemporary “progressive” iconoclasm in the U.S. with Harvard professor of English James Simpson, who will discuss how the standard liberal view is that iconoclasts are somewhere else and “them.” “They” are vandals in other parts of the globe who destroy art (e.g. ISIS; China’s cultural revolution). The history of Anglo-American iconoclasm tells a slightly less comfortable story of iconoclasts having been us and here (England experienced a century of legislated iconoclasm of every religious image between 1538 and 1644; it exported distrust of the image to New England). Simpson will also turn to perhaps the least comforting instances of iconoclasm, by looking to contemporary “progressive” iconoclasm in the United States, where we see that the iconoclasts are us and now.

For more information, please contact:

Caryn Sowa, csowa@wellesley.edu

peter baehr

Peter Baehr

“Intelligent” Liberalism: The Affirmations and Antipathies of Rebecca West
Jan 28, 2020, 4:30 PM
Library Lecture Room
Free and open to the public

Over a life that spanned two centuries and seventy-one years of literary production, Rebecca West (1892-1983) was an author of remarkable versatility. Today she is most often recalled for her novels, short stories, literary criticism and autobiographically laced travelogues. But Rebecca West was also a political writer of astonishing verve: resourceful, combative and impelled by a strong sense of responsibility for the commonweal.

In this talk Peter Baehr describes Rebecca West’s distinctive brand of liberalism. It was marked by a series of affirmations and negations: individualism against conformism, freedom against censorship, responsibility against immaturity, decency against gratuitousness, and empathy against incredulity. The talk approaches West’s peculiar brand of liberalism not as an abstract philosophy in the mode of Martha Nussbaum, Jürgen Habermas, or John Rawls, but as a set of ideas forged in oppositional encounters with movements, and currents of thought, she considered fatal to a free society: nihilism, Communism, and imperialism. “It is never possible,” West wrote in 1951, “to serve the interests of liberalism by believing that which is false to be true.” Liberalism was “intelligent” to the degree it was truthful against all pressures of ideology and special pleading.

Peter Baehr is a research professor in social theory at Lingnan University, Hong Kong who teaches and writes mainly in the areas of social and political thought. Before coming to Hong Kong in 2000, he worked at universities in Canada and Britain. Baehr’s work has been translated into 10 languages, including Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Japanese, and Russian. His books include The Unmasking Style in Social Theory (2019), Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, and the Social Sciences (2010), and Caesar and the Fading of the Roman World (1998).

Robin Sparkman

Robin Sparkman ’91: Listening Is an Act of Love: Lessons from StoryCorps

Nov 14, 4:30 PM
Alumnae Hall Ballroom
Free and open to the public

StoryCorps CEO Robin Sparkman ’91 explains how the oral history nonprofit brings people together to have the most meaningful conversations of their lives. Sparkman will play excerpts from StoryCorps’ NPR broadcasts and Emmy-award winning animations and talk about the power of storytelling to create empathy and bridge divides.

Sparkman joined StoryCorps as its first CEO in January 2014; its fundraising, programs, marketing, finance, and digital teams report to her. During her tenure, she has focused on creating and developing StoryCorps’ first app; growing and expanding its national board; bringing in an experienced senior management team; creating the organization’s strategic plan; re-energizing its earned income business; and helping StoryCorps expand its creative offerings.

Before coming to StoryCorps, Sparkman spent 20 years as a journalist. She is a magna cum laude graduate of Wellesley College and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. Sparkman sits on the board of the Union Settlement Association of East Harlem (finance and development committees) and serves on the Wellesley Business Leadership Council. She lives in New York City with her family.