Zoom Remote Teaching Options

Classroom Scenarios

Zoom may be useful for a range of scenarios in which the instructor, or one more students, needs to participate in a class from a remote location. These instructions assume you have already installed Zoom and read through the instructions for Scheduling and Managing your Meeting.

See our Quick Tips page for privacy tips.

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Faculty Member is remote. Students are in the classroom.
  • Faculty (host) Setup:

  • Classroom setup:

    • A computer in the classroom will need to connect to the Zoom meeting from the Calendar invitation. This computer should be connected to the classroom projection to take advantage of the large screen and room speakers.

    • Installed classroom computers are not equipped with a microphone or camera. Options for connecting with students in the classroom include:

      • Using a student laptop (with built-in microphone and camera) in the classroom

      • Using a student phone to dial in to the meeting (make sure computer audio is not selected when connecting to the meeting to avoid awful feedback!)

      • Requesting a USB web camera for your classroom computer (contact the Help Desk) - supplies are limited

      • Contacting LTS (via the Help Desk) to discuss any particular classroom activities or requirements that may benefit from additional support

    • To the extent LTS staff are available, we can help launch Zoom in your classroom if you are teaching remotely. In the event LTS staff are unable to do this, any student can launch the meeting. Call the Help Desk to schedule or request "just in time" assistance.

    • Ask a student to help manage the classroom session by acting as the eyes and ears in the classroom outside the camera view and microphone range (e.g. repeating questions). Students can rotate in this role, and will be most helpful if you can clearly articulate how they can help at the start of the meeting.

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One or more students are remote. Faculty member and other students are in the classroom.
  • Pre-Meeting Communication with remote students

    • Clarify whether students are expected to appear over video

    • Clarify how students will participate (someone is monitoring chat, for raised hands, etc.)

    • Clarify how course materials will be provided if you are using the classroom boards

    • Notify students if you intend to record the meeting

    • Use a low-stakes community building activity to help everyone get familiar with how to work in Zoom. Helpful activities will provide opportunities for students to practice muting/unmuting microphones, raising hands, sharing screens, and any other Zoom features you plan to use.

  • Student Setup:

    • Find a quiet location with strong, stable internet service
    • Launch the meeting using the Zoom application on a computer or mobile device. Use only a single audio source to avoid feedback.
  • Classroom Setup:
    • Launch the meeting using the Zoom application on a computer connected to the classroom projector. Use only a single audio source (computer or phone).

    • Installed classroom computers are not equipped with a microphone or camera. Options for connecting with remote students in the classroom include:

      • Presenting from a laptop (with built-in microphone and camera) in the classroom

      • Using a phone to dial in to the meeting (make sure computer audio is not selected when connecting to the meeting to avoid awful feedback!)

      • Requesting a USB web camera for your classroom computer (contact the Help Desk) - supplies are limited

      • Contacting LTS (via the Help Desk) to discuss any particular classroom activities or requirements that may benefit from additional support

    • The "view" of any camera is going to be narrow so you may need to move the camera (or laptop) to capture the board, you, or classroom participation throughout the class. Check in with your remote participants if necessary.

    • Additional options

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All participants are remote.
  • Pre-Meeting Communication with students

    • Clarify whether students are expected to appear over video

    • Clarify how students will participate (someone is monitoring chat, for raised hands, etc.)

    • Notify students if you intend to record the meeting

    • Use a low-stakes community building activity to help everyone get familiar with how to work in Zoom. Helpful activities will provide opportunities for students to practice muting/unmuting microphones, raising hands, sharing screens, and any other Zoom features you plan to use.

  • Student Setup:

    • Find a quiet location with strong, stable internet service
    • Launch the meeting using the Zoom application on a computer or mobile device. Use only a single audio source to avoid feedback.
  • Faculty (host) Setup:

 

Classroom activities

The PLTC has created a page on its internal Google Site containing pedagogical resources, including remote teaching best practices and evidence-based frameworks for effective online education. You can access that page here: https://sites.google.com/wellesley.edu/pltcfall2018/remote-teaching

Pepperdine’s Keep on Teaching page provides guidance regarding the pedagogical aspects of distance teaching, which help keep students progressing toward your course’s learning outcomes during disruptions.

The General Principles section describes how you can start preparing for disruptions before they occur. 

The Specific Strategies section gives suggestions for moving in class activities to online spaces. It covers: 

  • Communicating with students - including holding virtual office hours using Zoom
  • Delivering Lecture Content Online
  • Running Lab Activities Online
  • Conducting Discussions and Collaborative Work Online
  • Receiving Student Presentations Online
  • Administering Tests & Quizzes Online

Pepperdine is a Sakai school. They call Sakai “Courses”.

Questions

If you have questions about online teaching strategies and practices, please contact the ITIT line (x4848) or email askit@wellesley.edu