Prizes

Writing Program Prizes

The Writing Program recognizes excellence in academic writing through several awards that are generously endowed by the Three Generations Fund: the Three Generations Prize for First-Year Writing, the Three Generations Prize for Writing in the Sciences, the Three Generations Prize for Writing in the Social Sciences, and the Three Generations Prize for Writing in the Arts and Humanities. As of Spring 2020, the Davis Art Prize for Writing is being administered by the Davis Museum.

Congratulations to the recent winners of the
Writing Program Prize Competitions!

 

Three Generations Prize for First-Year Writing

Fall 2020   Booklet

First Place: Adeline Van Buskirk '24
“'Virtually Nobody': Protecting Older Adults in the COVID Era"
        WRIT 144 What’s in A Name? Investigating What We Call People, Places, and Things, Jeannine Johnson (Writing)

Honorable Mention: Victoria Ho '24
“The Political and Social Implications of François Boucher’s Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson, Marquise de Pompadour (1750)” 
                WRIT 107 / ARTH 100 The Power of Images: Introduction to Art and its Histories, Barbara Lynn-Davis (Art)

Spring 2020  Booklet

First Place (tie): Sophia Angus '23
Imagining Storm in the Mountains
             WRIT 107 / ARTH 100 The Power of Images: Introduction to Art and its Histories, Barbara Lynn-Davis (Art)

First Place (tie): Emily Lu '23
Reflections on Grief, Remembrance, and Race in Yusef Komunyakaa's "Facing It"
      WRIT 144 What's in A Name? Investigating What We Call People, Places, and Things, Jeannine Johnson (Writing)

Fall 2019   Booklet

First Place (tie): Jules Gabellini '23
The Intersections of Domesticity and Globalization in Vermeer's Young Woman with a Water Pitcher (1662)                             WRIT 107 / ARTH 100 The Power of Images: Introduction to Art and its Histories, Barbara Lynn-Davis (Art)

First Place (tie): Andreea Sabau '23

Surrender is Sweet (Never)
                                                WRIT 120 Critical Interpretation, Sarah Wall-Randell (English)

Honorable Mention: Mable Peach '23
Selling vs Truth-Telling: An Analysis of Two Self-Portraits  
                    WRIT 107 / ARTH 100 The Power of Images: An Introduction to Art and its Histories, Pat Berman (Art)

 

Three Generations Prize for Writing in the Social Sciences 2019-20

Alyssa Robins '22
An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Wellesley: Making a Case for the Ethnographic Value of Georges Perec's An Attempt at Exhausing a Place in Paris   
                         ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology, Justin Armstrong (Writing Program)

 

Three Generations Prize for Writing in the Sciences 2019-20

Cindy Zhou '20
The Dark Side of the Night Owl Life: Social jetlag causes "night owls" who follow "early bird" schedules to perform worse academically
                                 NEUR 325 Neurobiology of Sleep, Learning and Memory, Sharon Gobes (Neuroscience)

 

Three Generations Prize for Writing in the Arts and Humanities 2019-20

Emily Martin '21
Low on the Hog: Rejections and Medicalizations of Soul food in the 1970s-2000s   
                                      HIST 249 Cold War Culture and Politics in the United States, Brenna Greer (History)

Honorable Mention: Megan McNally '20
Sorrel in God's Garden: Fra Angelico's Frescoes at San Marco   
                    ARTH 328 Dining with Michelangelo: Art and Food in Renaissance Italy, Jacqueline Musacchio (Art)

 

About the Prizes

Three Generations Prize for First-Year Writing

A prize of $125 is awarded each fall and spring to honor excellence in writing in First-Year Writing (FYW) courses. A panel of Wellesley FYW instructors judge the prize.

Guidelines for Submission

  • The deadline for the Fall 2020 prize will be announced in September.
  • Nomination for this prize is by instructor only. Instructors are asked to submit one exemplary student paper per nomination (up to three nominations for each section of FYW).
  • Papers written for a course offered in Term 1 or Term 2 are eligible for the Fall 2020 prize. Papers written for a course offered in Term 3 or Term 4 are eligible for the Spring 2021 prize.
  • Nominations should be submitted via e-mail addressed to fywprize@wellesley.edu, with the student's name in the subject line. The instructor's name and the course number and title should be included in the body of the e-mail. The paper and the assignment it was written for should be submitted as attachments. Papers must be submitted as Word documents. The assignment sheet may be submitted in any form.

 

Three Generations Prizes for Writing in the Sciences, for Writing in the Social Sciences, and for Writing in the Arts and Humanities

A prize of $300 is offered annually for papers written by Wellesley students in each of these three areas: the sciences, social sciences, and arts and humanities. These prizes recognize Wellesley's commitment to promoting fine writing in all academic disciplines.

Papers written for any course or independent study are eligible, except for honors theses. Interdisciplinary papers are eligible. Submissions are judged by Wellesley College faculty.

Criteria

  • A complete, compelling, sophisticated argument that is logically developed and well-supported by evidence.
  • Writing that is clear, authoritative, and comprehensible to any intelligent reader.
  • Excellent presentation and integration of source material, data, and other evidence

Guidelines for Submission

  • The deadline for the 2020-2021 prizes is noon on Friday, April 16th.  
  • Submission is by self-nomination, and students should send their entries directly to the competition.
  • Submissions must contain both a copy of your paper and a cover sheet that includes: your name and class; the name of the professor and course for which you wrote the paper; a brief description of the assignment and the date the paper was submitted; and the prize (Science, Social Science, or Arts and Humanities) for which the paper is being submitted. If your paper is interdisciplinary, you may list two prizes, though each paper may only win one prize.
  • Send your paper in Word format as an e-mail attachment to writscienceprize@wellesley.eduwritsocscienceprize@wellesley.edu, or writhumanitiesprize@wellesley.edu depending upon which prize you are vying for.
  • Any currently-enrolled Wellesley College student may submit a paper for this prize.
  • Each contestant may submit only one entry.
  • Honors theses may not be submitted; but papers written for independent studies are eligible. Papers written for courses taken at MIT, Brandeis, Olin, or during an official exchange program are also eligible.
  • Papers written during the spring semester of the preceding year, as well as the fall and spring semesters of the current year, are eligible.
  • Prizes awarded to seniors will be listed in the Commencement Program and all other prize recipients will be listed in the Convocation Program.

 

Tips for Submitting a Prize-winning Paper

  • The judges look for a paper that reads well on its own and makes a strong and strongly visible argument, well-supported by evidence.
  • Most prize-winning papers have been revised for submission. For example, we suggest that you revise the introduction so it orients readers to your topic and prepares them to understand the significance of your argument.
  • We also urge students to consult with their instructors to determine whether a paper is worthy of submission for a prize.
  • Prize-winning papers in the sciences and social sciences should demonstrate the writer's ability to present evidence in well-produced graphic form, as necessary. Prize-winning papers in the arts should include visual documentation of the object(s) written about.
  • Be sure that the paper references sources fully, completely, and in correct form for the discipline.
  • A paper with spelling errors, typos, or grammatical errors cannot win a prize.

In the past, prizes have been awarded both to highly technical papers and to papers written for a general audience. The judges are interested in the wide range of writing that is done in all academic disciplines.

Questions? 

Contact Justin Armstrong <jarmstro@wellesley.edu>, coordinator of the writing competitions.