Pauline de Tholozany

Pauline de Tholozany
pdetholo@wellesley.edu

(781) 283-2454
French
B.A., Paris IV La Sorbonne; M.A., Ph.D., Brown University



Pauline de Tholozany
Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow

Specialist in Nineteenth-century French Literature, with a focus on the novel.


I received a Ph.D. from Brown University in 2011, and will be a Mellon Postdoctorate Fellow in French at Wellesley starting this fall. I am a specialist in nineteenth-century French literature and culture, with a focus on the novel and popular press of the early nineteenth century. I work primarily on representations of civility, customs, and forms of sociability in the literature of the first decades of the century. I am also interested in children’s literature and child-rearing practices of the period. My dissertation looked at perceptions and representations of clumsiness from the late XVIIIth century to the 1840s.  I am currently working on a book manuscript in which I question the concept of maladresse as it emerged in nineteenth-century France and evolved from signifying social disgrace to becoming a sign of sincerity, naturalness, and eventually originality. I look at the history of clumsiness from several critical perspectives, borrowing concepts from anthropology, sociology, philosophy, history, and psychoanalysis. My book touches upon a variety of subjects, and includes chapters on social customs, literary representations of clumsiness, child-rearing practices, and caricatural representations of maladresse. I am also interested in representations of flâneurs and flânerie in nineteenth-century Paris, and more specifically in the marginal figures that appear in newspapers and physiologies of the period such as the child flâneur, the clumsy or overly distracted flâneur, and female embodiments of flânerie.