sgrote@wellesley.edu

(781) 283-2660
History
A.B., Harvard University; M.Phil., Cambridge University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
FND 204



Simon Grote
Assistant Professor of History

Intellectual and cultural historian of early modern Europe.


I study the intellectual history of seventeenth-­ and eighteenth­-century Europe, focusing on the Scottish and German Enlightenments. The topics touched by my research include the history of political and economic thought, universities and academic culture, and religion and its relationship to modernity.

My current projects include the book I am now finishing, The Emergence of Modern Aesthetic Theory in Enlightenment Germany and Scotland (under contract with Cambridge University Press): an attempt to explain why early eighteenth- century Scotland and Germany witnessed an explosion of interest in theories of beauty and the arts. This was the moment when what we now call modern aesthetic theory was born. The new theories of beauty and the arts, I argue, grew out of ongoing debates about theology, moral philosophy, and natural law. While finishing this book, I have begun a project on the concept of original sin in Enlightenment Europe and a project tracing the emergence of “style” as a concept important to art criticism. Working on these projects has often taken me to the library and archive of the Francke Foundations in Halle, which has on several occasions provided me with financial and other material support.

Over the past two years, my research and teaching have been shaped by Wellesley College’s flourishing book studies community. In the company of colleagues on campus, and under the guidance of faculty at the Rare Book School at the University of Virginia, I have become more aware of the ways in which sound interpretation of texts requires understanding their material aspects. My own education in this area has been supported since 2014 by an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography from the Rare Book School; and the central role of rare books in several of the courses I teach has been made possible by the treasures of Wellesley’s Special Collections, curated by Ruth Rogers and Mariana Oller.

Other communities at Wellesley in which I have been active include the Program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Long Eighteenth Century Working Group, and the Susan and Donald Newhouse Center for the Humanities.

My teaching includes courses on early modern Europe and early modern Germany, as well as courses that delve more deeply into topics in European intellectual and cultural history: the early history of economic thought, the Enlightenment, the history of science, and aspects of visual and material culture. My new courses for 2015­-2016 include an introduction to the Scientific Revolution (WRIT117/HIST117: “From Miracles to Mesmerism: The Cultural History of the Scientific Revolution”), a seminar on monarchy and regicide in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries (HIST352: “King­ Killers in Early Modern Britain and France”), and a survey of the history and literature of the Renaissance (ENG221/HIST221: “The Renaissance”), co­taught with Sarah Wall­-Randell.