Curriculum

PEAC Courses for Fall 2014

PEAC 104: Introduction to Peace and Justice

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of conflict, justice, and peace. The course engages students in developing an analytical and theoretical framework for examining the dynamics of conflict, violence, and injustice and the strategies that have been employed to attain peace and justice, including: balance of power, cooperation, diplomacy and conflict resolution, law, human rights, social movements, social justice (economic, environmental, and race/class/gender), interpersonal communication, and religiously inspired social transformation.

PEAC 259: Topics in Peace and Justice Studies

Topic for 2014-15: Human Rights and Cultural Production in Latin America

This course will examine the role of the writer, the visual artist and the intellectual in contemporary Latin America from the seventies to the present. The readings assigned, as well as the films and other forms of visual representation, will expose the student to the role of the writer as a political activist and witness political violence and injustice. Special critical attention will be given to the relationship of aesthetic representations of the literature of Human Rights and to the eethical intricacies of the relationship between the arts and social justice.

PEAC 304: Senior Seminar in Peace and Justice Studies

Topic for 2014-2015: Women's Organizing for Peace and Justice

A capstone course for the major in Peace and Justice Studies centered on a seminar project and paper that students research and write on a subject of their choice in relation to the course topic, and on readings and discussions exporing essential topics and research methods in peace studies.

 

PEAC Courses for Spring 2015

PEAC 104: Introduction to Peace and Justice

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of conflict, justice, and peace. The course engages students in developing an analytical and theoretical framework for examining the dynamics of conflict, violence, and injustice and the strategies that have been employed to attain peace and justice, including: balance of power, cooperation, diplomacy and conflict resolution, law, human rights, social movements, social justice (economic, environmental, and race/class/gender), interpersonal communication, and religiously inspired social transformation.

PEAC 204: Conflict Transformation in Theory and Practice

This course provides the student with an in-depth study of conflict and its resolution. We will explore the basic theoretical concepts of the field and apply this knowledge as we learn and practice skills for analyzing and resolving conflicts. The course seeks to answer the following questions at both the theoretical level and the level of engaged action: What are the causes and consequences of conflict? How do we come to know and understand conflict? How do our assumptions about conflict affect our strategies for management, resolution, or transformation? What methods are available for waging and resolving conflicts productively rather than destructively?

PEAC 205: Gender, War and Peacebuilding

In this course we explore the gendered dimensions of war and peace, including how gender as a symbolic construct configures how we make sense of war making and peacebuilding; how differently gendered people experience war and peace; and how peace and war are co-constitutive with gender relations. We pay particular attention to the "continuum of violence", from the "private" to the "public" sphere, from militarization of everyday living to overt violent conflict. We address issues such as the political economy of war, sexualized violence, the militarization of gendered bodies, and gendered political activism. Finally, we reflect on the implications of gendered wars for the building of peace, looking at the gendered aspects of "post-conflict" peacebuilding and gendered forms of resistance to political violence.

PEAC 363: War Resistance and American Literature

A study of how war resistance, or the antiwar impulse, has been represented and thought about in American sacred texts, fictions, plays, poems, films, songs, operas, letters, treatises, memoirs, and essays. Some possible texts, in chronological order: John Woolman's visionary 18th-century Journal, the Book of Mormon, Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience," Julia Ward Howe's Mother's Day Proclamation, William James's "The Moral Equivalent of War," memoirs by Jane Addams and Dorothy Day, High Noon, speeches by Dwight Eisenhower, letters and essays by Martin Luther King, journalism by Norman Mailer and Barbara Deming, Daniel Berrigan's drama The Trial of the Catonsville Nine, Nicholson Baker's Human Smoke, Philip Glass's opera Satyagraha, and a broad, broad range of anti-war poems and songs. Opportunity for both creative and critical work.

 

Program Description

Peace and Justice Major Declaration Form (Classes 2014-2017)

Peace and Justice Major Declaration Form (Class of 2018 & beyond)

Contact Us

Contact Us

Peace and Justice Studies
Wellesley College
106 Central Street
Wellesley, MA 02481
Tel: 781.283.2563
 

Lawrence Rosenwald
Director
lrosenwa@wellesley.edu
Tel: 781.283.2634

Susan Lange
Administrative Assistant
slange2@wellesley.edu
Tel: 781.283.2563