Projects for Peace Alumni Award (graduates)

Kate Dailinger
Kate Dailinger

Projects for Peace is a global program that partners with educational institutions to identify and support young peacebuilders and changemakers. The program encourages young adults to develop innovative, community-centered, and scalable responses to the world’s most pressing issues. Along the way, these student leaders increase their knowledge, improve skills, and begin to see themselves as agents of change. Since 2007, Projects for Peace has worked with approximately 115 colleges and universities to support almost 2000 projects.

Each year, the Projects for Peace Alumni Award will award up to $50,000 to support the continuing peacebuilding efforts of past Projects for Peace grantees. The Award is made possible through the Kathryn Wasserman Davis Collaborative in Conflict Transformation at Middlebury.  Campus application deadline typically in January. 

“For students interested in advocacy or a cause, such as immigration or civil rights – roll up your sleeves and volunteer! Through volunteering, you will gain insight and professional contacts in your chosen field.”

“I previously had dreams to be an author, but found myself called by the combination of logic, mystery, and truth in science.”

Introduction to Careers in the US Federal Government and the Federal Resume

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

“A good federal resume should clearly outline your key work, volunteer experiences, academic accomplishments as well as extra-curricular activities. It should also highlight the unique skills that set you apart and make you uniquely qualified for the position.”
— Department of Homeland Security Website

“Wellesley gave me confidence, support, advice, interview practice, and guidance in how I define myself professionally.”

Getting Started in Politics, Advocacy, Government at the Local & National Levels

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

Local and state government offers students a great opportunity to see how agencies and legislation work on a smaller scale. For students passionate about their state or a particular issue, state politics is a wonderful place to get started! Below, I highlight a few ways to get involved in politics at the local (including at Wellesley!) and state level. In terms of gaining experience at the national level in US politics and policy, DC is the place to go. This document will address finding a range of internships in DC as well tips for networking. We’ll start with the three branches of government, briefly address other government agencies, move to international organizations, and finish with think tanks and nonprofits. For students interested in international affairs and government, intern and/or study abroad to demonstrate your regional expertise and intercultural communication and adaptability skills.   

Careers in Social Services

Hayley
Hayley Meredith McIlvaine

The term “social services” is a broad umbrella that captures a range of career pathways. In this resource, we will outline those pathways that are focused on mental health and wellness. In addition, although we highlight here some career pathways that are common.

Careers in the Military and Law Enforcement

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

The majority of law enforcement jobs are US government positions at the federal and state level and therefore are of interest to students interested in public service. The information below focuses on the maintenance of public order and enforcing the law. Please also refer to the “Government” resource page for more information about public service careers outside of military and physical law enforcement.

Study Abroad: Government, International Affairs, Law, & Public Policy Careers

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

Students interested in careers in government, law, international affairs, and public policy are encouraged to focus on skill development and experience. This is especially important as employers, and graduate programs in this space continue to look for commitment to understanding these industries.  Below please find suggested study abroad experiences that help develop specific skills and experiences to help be competitive in these industries.

 

“Medicine is about studying how life works, but the practice of medicine is also learning about life through other people. I have appreciated the opportunity to experience both this summer.”

“Although I am still deep in the throes of being a ‘first year’ teacher, I would not trade my experience for anything.... Teach For America has taught me to be strong, to be critical and to be thankful.”

“I was thrilled by the idea of pursuing a career in reproductive justice, a personal and extracurricular interest of mine, and decided to explore opportunities related to this profession.”

“As a nurse I have educated patients and their families, provided a shoulder to cry on, assisted in surgeries, managed complicated equipment, advocated for my patients, saved them from unsafe prescribed doses of medications, visited new families at home, and witnessed both birth and death. I am a touchstone for patients and their families in their most joyful and tragic moments, and it is an honor.”

Projects for Peace (students)

Kate Dailinger
Kate Dailinger

Created in 2007 by Kathryn Wasserman Davis (Wellesley College '28), the Projects for Peace program offers undergraduates and graduating seniors funding to design a grassroots project for the summer of 2022—anywhere in the world — that promotes peace and addresses the root causes of conflict among parties. Projects may employ innovative techniques for engaging project participants in ways that focus on conflict resolution, reconciliation, building understanding and breaking down barriers that cause conflict, and finding ways to resolve conflict and maintain peace. Any current Wellesley student is eligible to apply. Campus application deadline typically in January.