Introduction to International Affairs

Marisa Crowley
Marisa Crowley ’05

A career in international affairs can be fueled by a passion to travel and a desire to learn about our global environment, effectuate change, and make a difference in the world. As an interdisciplinary field at Wellesley, the international affairs major exposes students to an array of perspectives and analytical methodologies that equip them to enter a workforce in a broad range of organizations and experiences. The work in international affairs can truly change the world; however, it is important to focus on the small steps that will maximize your success and lead you to a fruitful career in international affairs.

Careers in the Military and Law Enforcement

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

The majority of law enforcement jobs are US government positions at the federal and state level and therefore are of interest to students interested in public service. The information below focuses on the maintenance of public order and enforcing the law. Please also refer to the “Government” resource page for more information about public service careers outside of military and physical law enforcement.

Introduction to Think Tanks

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

Think tanks are public policy research, analysis, and engagement organizations. They are organizations that generate policy-oriented research, analysis, and advice on domestic and international issues that enable policymakers and the public to make informed decisions about public policy issues. Think tanks may be affiliated with political parties, governments, interest groups, or private corporations or constituted as independent non-governmental organizations (NGOs). 

 

"Sarah Ahmed [former Gov, Intl. Affairs and Law Advisor] has been an invaluable resource for securing an internship in DC, as a source of advice and a guiding light pointing me in the direction of opportunities."

Introduction to Law & Law School

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

Pre-law Advising at Wellesley: Information for Prospective Students

Christina Breitner
Christina Breiter

The liberal arts education offered by Wellesley College prepares students for a wide range of careers and graduate studies, including law school. This resource contains answers to some FAQ about preparing for law school.

Law School — College Certification

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

Many law schools require that a dean's or college certification or questionnaire be completed by the applicant's undergraduate institution. This certification typically requests the applicant's class rank, status on physical or emotional health, and information on matters of discipline during the undergraduate years.

“Throughout my time at Wellesley, the advisors at Career Education were instrumental in helping me navigate the labyrinth of academia and pointing me toward resources and opportunities that would help me achieve my goals.”

GoinGlobal

Wellesley Career Education logo
Wellesley Career Education

 

GoinGlobal is the leading provider of both country-specific and USA city-specific career and employment information. Our unlimited access subscription database features 38 Country Career Guides, 53 City Career Guides for the United States and Canada, corporate profiles and more than 16 million internship and job listings within the USA and around the world.

“For students interested in advocacy or a cause, such as immigration or civil rights – roll up your sleeves and volunteer! Through volunteering, you will gain insight and professional contacts in your chosen field.”

Princeton Review: Discounted Test Preparation

Wellesley Career Education logo
Wellesley Career Education

 

Wellesley Career Education is pleased to announce a partnership with Princeton Review that will enable Wellesley students and alumnae to purchase test review products at a discount!

Introduction to Careers in the US Federal Government and the Federal Resume

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

“A good federal resume should clearly outline your key work, volunteer experiences, academic accomplishments as well as extra-curricular activities. It should also highlight the unique skills that set you apart and make you uniquely qualified for the position.”
— Department of Homeland Security Website

Getting Started in Politics, Advocacy, Government at the Local & National Levels

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

Local and state government offers students a great opportunity to see how agencies and legislation work on a smaller scale. For students passionate about their state or a particular issue, state politics is a wonderful place to get started! Below, I highlight a few ways to get involved in politics at the local (including at Wellesley!) and state level. In terms of gaining experience at the national level in US politics and policy, DC is the place to go. This document will address finding a range of internships in DC as well tips for networking. We’ll start with the three branches of government, briefly address other government agencies, move to international organizations, and finish with think tanks and nonprofits. For students interested in international affairs and government, intern and/or study abroad to demonstrate your regional expertise and intercultural communication and adaptability skills.   

Private Sector: Consulting (Political, Management, International, Defense) and Government Relations

Nicole
Nicole D. Park

This resource is an overview of:

  • Political consulting: firms who are hired by individuals, political groups, and campaigns to help run political campaigns
  • Management consulting & Strategic Advisory: in this document, this term refers to firms that focus on consulting as it relates to government and international affairs interests and aerospace and defense contracting 
  • Government relations: the sector of an organization that focuses on public policy and advocacy.