Careers in Nonprofits

Hayley
Hayley Meredith McIlvaine

While all nonprofits share a commitment to bettering society in some capacity, they are incredibly diverse in terms of size, focus, and type. In the United States alone there are millions of nonprofits ranging from small, community-based organizations, to cultural and educational institutions such as museums, universities and colleges (like Wellesley!) to large foundations supporting causes around the globe.

Industry Expertise for Alumnae: Education, Nonprofit, and Social Impact

Wellesley Career Education offers personalized advising and industry expertise in the areas of Education, Nonprofit, and Human Services. Visit the page for Education, Nonprofit, and Human Services to learn about careers in highereducation, k12- education, nonprofits, social services, and other related fields.

Teaching Fellowships

Caitlin Roberts-Donovan
Caitlin Roberts-Donovan

One of the common “purposeful activities” that fellowships can fund is teaching: in the U.S. or abroad; opportunities with or without previous teaching experience; and at all levels of instruction, from elementary school to university level and beyond. This resource is by no means exhaustive, but instead aims to provide graduating students and alumnae with an introduction to the biggest and most common teaching fellowships

Creative Writing

Hebert
Hebert Labbate

As a practice, creative writing refers to a wide variety of disciplines. Writers who want to publish novels, poetry, short fiction, and creative non-fiction often earn an MFA and support their creative practice by teaching in higher education.

Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning

Lorraine
Lorraine Hanley ’98

The Lumpkin Summer Institute for Service Learning offers students the opportunity to work in Boston-based non-profits geared toward social change and community engagement.

“I am so thrilled that I will be able to learn directly from women leaders in crucial environmental projects in a diverse array of Latin American countries that I otherwise could not have ever imagined visiting.”

“Detroit has opened my eyes to the role of the built environment in creating a sense of place for its inhabitants.”

“Investors don’t have to choose between making money & making the world better... Today’s smart money is investing in people and the planet.”

“In a given week, I might be working with our program staff who are based around the US, Canada and the UK to design learning experiences for teachers; meeting with partner organizations to plan collaborative projects; consulting with filmmakers or scholars who want to reach students; or researching and writing about challenging issues for educators.... It’s probably unusual to stay at one place for so long, but I’ve always been able to answer ‘yes’ to a few key questions: Am I learning? Is my world getting bigger? Is my work making a difference?”

“From the beginning, my career mentor was there to brainstorm, encourage, and motivate me to pursue an internship that aligned with my interests.”

On-Campus Recruiting Program Policies (Students)

Sarah Isham
Sarah Isham

Career Education expects all students to abide by the following rules in order to maintain the success and integrity of Wellesley’s recruiting program.

Projects for Peace (students)

Kate Dailinger
Kate Dailinger

Created in 2007 by Kathryn Wasserman Davis (Wellesley College '28), the Projects for Peace program offers undergraduates and graduating seniors funding to design a grassroots project for the summer of 2022—anywhere in the world — that promotes peace and addresses the root causes of conflict among parties. Projects may employ innovative techniques for engaging project participants in ways that focus on conflict resolution, reconciliation, building understanding and breaking down barriers that cause conflict, and finding ways to resolve conflict and maintain peace. Any current Wellesley student is eligible to apply. Campus application deadline typically in January.