The Questions

What do women need to know right now?

What superpowers should women cultivate?

Why are women the future of leadership?

5:22
Anita Hill, Social activist; attorney; educator

Campus activism, Hill says, was one of the catalysts for what became the #MeToo movement.

3:22
Anita Hill, Social activist; attorney; educator

Hill believes women should approach all people with the desire to understand the context of their lives, not what happened to them in a single moment.

3:25
Anita Hill, Social activist; attorney; educator

Hill reminds women that they already have many superpowers to use as they craft their futures.

4:04
Anita Hill, Social activist; attorney; educator

Hill says, the 1991 Senate hearings “shaped who she was and what she could do in the world.”

 
3:05
Anita Hill, Social activist; attorney; educator

Now more than ever, Hill says, there is space for different, authentic voices to emerge as long as they are “strong and clear.”

2:45
Samantha Power, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations (2013–2017)

Power explains that the best leaders know how to “step into the shoes of other people.”

6:03
Samantha Power, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations (2013–2017)

Power says women should develop a thirst for learning that prompts them to believe themselves “capable of making a difference.”

4:25
Samantha Power, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations (2013–2017)

Samantha Power speaks about how organizing across borders can overcome international challenges.

2:25
Samantha Power, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations (2013–2017)

"Coalitions come together through leadership."

5:53
Samantha Power, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations (2013–2017)

"I think the best writing occurs when there's some question you're burning to understand."

1:56
Samantha Power, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations (2013–2017)

"I think there's going to be a real opportunity in a couple years to renovate and replenish some of these institutions and to bring in a whole new wave of talent."

1:32
Tracy K. Smith, United States Poet Laureate

Smith reflects on how future leaders could unite people across artificial divisions by appealing to their shared humanity.

2:41
Tracy K. Smith, United States Poet Laureate

Bold female writers influenced Smith at the beginning of her journey into poetry, inspiring her to cultivate a courageous voice.

3:06
Tracy K. Smith, United States Poet Laureate

Smith found her voice as a writer by looking closely at moments of unrest that motivated her to sit down and write.

2:17
Tracy K. Smith, United States Poet Laureate

Smith believes spoken-word poetry brings traditional style to new audiences excited by the possibility of language.

5:11
Tracy K. Smith, United States Poet Laureate

Smith tells the story of how she came to discover, almost by accident, the central theme of her collection Wade in the Water.

1:33
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia (2006–2018); Nobel laureate

Women must continue to be the “advocates of humanity” and find the courage to stand up for what they believe, Sirleaf says.

4:28
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia (2006–2018); Nobel laureate

Strong positions, consistent with her values, grounded Sirleaf throughout her remarkable and transformative career in politics.

4:33
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia (2006–2018); Nobel laureate

Sirleaf explains how appointing the first female chief of police changed the lives of women in her country.

3:36
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia (2006–2018); Nobel laureate

Sirleaf describes how women voters helped her become the first democratically elected female president in Africa.

5:13
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia (2006–2018); Nobel laureate

Sirleaf talks about the global reach of the infectious disease: “This disease crosses borders without a visa.”

4:38
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia (2006–2018); Nobel laureate

Crime against women is an “unfinished area of progress” in her country, Sirleaf says. She continues to work with lawmakers to fix it.

2:05
Agnes Binagwaho, Minister of Health, Rwanda (2011–2016); Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity

Binagwaho says future leaders should acknowledge that they can be good at many things and follow that advice where it leads.

4:26
Agnes Binagwaho, Minister of Health, Rwanda (2011–2016); Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity

In searching for her own identity, Binagwaho researched Rwanda’s tumultuous history to better serve all its people.

7:59
Agnes Binagwaho, Minister of Health, Rwanda (2011–2016); Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity

Binagwaho speaks about how a chance meeting with Paul Farmer brought Partners In Health to Rwanda.

3:36
Agnes Binagwaho, Minister of Health, Rwanda (2011–2016); Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity

A “quick solution is the enemy of sustainability,” says Binagwaho. Resilience kept her and her partners on track when establishing enduring systems.

2:58
Agnes Binagwaho, Minister of Health, Rwanda (2011–2016); Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity

“Changing the world for good means giving people the knowledge to do so,” says Binagwaho on the founding of Rwanda’s University of Global Health Equity.

2:30
Agnes Binagwaho, Minister of Health, Rwanda (2011–2016); Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity

Binagwaho chose to dedicate her life to those without power by creating health systems that benefit her people.

1:23
Kakenya Ntaiya, Kenyan educator; social activist

Ntaiya believes leaders shape the future when they “pick someone up,” giving them the chance to achieve more than they did.

3:10
Kakenya Ntaiya, Kenyan educator; social activist

For Ntaiya, providing women a strong and safe environment in which to learn is the most effective way to inspire change.

5:27
Kakenya Ntaiya, Kenyan educator; social activist

Ntaiya built a school in a Kenyan village so that girls could get an education and thereby determine their own futures.

3:21
Kakenya Ntaiya, Kenyan educator; social activist

When thinking about how to educate girls, Ntaiya emphasizes bettering every aspect of life—from health and wellness to studying.

2:38
Kakenya Ntaiya, Kenyan educator; social activist

Ntaiya and President Johnson compare Kenyan and American education cohort programs that encourage success through teamwork.

1:43
Kakenya Ntaiya, Kenyan educator; social activist

Ntaiya wants to expand her mission to develop more passionate leaders by creating a model that can be replicated in other communities.

2:01
Ophelia Dahl, Co-founder and Chair of the Board, Partners in Health

Dahl tells leaders to “do what you love to do,” and never rush letting a plan unfold as your life unfolds.

1:43
Ophelia Dahl, Co-founder and Chair of the Board, Partners in Health

Dahl says finding collaborators across the globe who refused to turn away from the world’s problems changed her work.

7:55
Ophelia Dahl, Co-founder and Chair of the Board, Partners in Health

Rwanda’s detailed vision for its future allowed Dahl and Partners In Health to see which aspects they could help the country achieve.

3:36
Ophelia Dahl, Co-founder and Chair of the Board, Partners in Health

Trusting the right people and doing good work allowed Dahl to form a resilient network and create a lasting impact across the world.

2:57
Ophelia Dahl, Co-founder and Chair of the Board, Partners in Health

Dahl discusses what healthcare professionals in the United States can learn from countries like Rwanda.

4:22
Wendy Sherman, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (2011–2015)

Earning a social work degree and community organizing gave Sherman the skills to adapt as she led negotiations with politicians and dictators.

2:29
Wendy Sherman, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (2011–2015)

Sherman recalls how strong female leaders in the Obama administration shaped negotiations with Iran.

2:04
Wendy Sherman, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (2011–2015)

Sherman urges leaders to be their authentic selves, and to understand and own the power they have.

2:21
Wendy Sherman, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (2011–2015)

Sherman’s advice for young women is to let twists and turns in careers and family life influence their lives.

1:15
Wendy Sherman, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (2011–2015)

One lesson Sherman has learned during her career is that “power is not inherently bad, dirty, or corrupt—it’s how we use it.”

3:11
Wendy Sherman, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (2011–2015)

Sherman takes us insides negotiations with North Korea and shares her insights on the present state of relations.