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Resources for Underrepresented Students and Alumnae Applying to Health Profession Schools

Cindy
Cindy Seltzer, Ed.D., MBA

A crucial topic in healthcare today is how to eliminate inequities in the quality and availability of medical care for ethnic, racial, social, and economic minorities. There is an urgent need to increase both the diversity and cultural competence of our health care workforce.

“I was motivated to fight for environmental justice in my community after hearing about the respiratory illnesses that many children were diagnosed with as a result of the environmental contamination we live with.”

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (sophomores and juniors)

Kate Dailinger
Kate Dailinger

The Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program (MMUF) was founded to increase diversity among minority faculty scholars in higher education. MMUF supports underrepresented minority students and others who have demonstrated commitment to eradicating racial disparities in academia by encouraging talented students to develop their academic interests, pursue and complete their doctoral training, and thrive in their faculty careers in higher education. With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, MMUF undergraduates are able to conduct original undergraduate research in the humanities and social sciences. Campus deadline annually in March

The Susan Rappaport Knafel ’52 Scholarship for Foreign Study or Traveling Fellowship (rising seniors)

Kate Dailinger
Kate Dailinger

Scholarship for Foreign Study – up to $36,000
The scholarship will be awarded to a member of the graduating class who displays a desire for learning and an ability to impart knowledge and judgment to others.  It will fund a year of study at a foreign institution to pursue a specific subject that requires contact with foreign scholars, libraries or other resources.  

Traveling Fellowship – up to $36,000
The fellowship will be awarded to a member of the graduating class who displays an interest in and an acceptance of others, and who displays the ethos of a Wellesley education.  It will fund a year of purposeful travel abroad to explore a particular interest with the requirement that the recipient not remain in the same area for more than two months.

Davis Projects for Peace (students)

Kate Dailinger
Kate Dailinger

Created in 2007 by Kathryn Wasserman Davis (Wellesley College '28), the Projects for Peace program offers undergraduates and graduating seniors funding to design a grassroots project for the summer of 2022—anywhere in the world — that promotes peace and addresses the root causes of conflict among parties. Projects may employ innovative techniques for engaging project participants in ways that focus on conflict resolution, reconciliation, building understanding and breaking down barriers that cause conflict, and finding ways to resolve conflict and maintain peace. Any current Wellesley student is eligible to apply. Campus application deadline typically in January.

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