Kariann Goldschmitt

Kariann E. Goldschmitt, latin american, music, african, wellesley
kgoldschmitt@wellesley.edu
(781) 283-2074
Music
B.A., University of California (Los Angeles); M.A., University of California (San Diego); Ph.D., University of California (Los Angeles)

Kariann E. Goldschmitt

Assistant Professor of Music

Ethnomusicologist and popular music scholar of Brazil and Latin America; Jazz and the African Diaspora; Audiovisual Media; global music industry


I am a popular music scholar of the Americas, especially Brazil. My first book project studies the popularity of Brazilian music among English-speaking audiences starting in the 1960s and covers such genres as bossa nova, easy listening, jazz fusion, world music, hip-hop, and indie rock. I am also interested in how popular and traditional music represents difference in the global music market.

My research also focuses on the role music plays in audiovisual contexts such as film, television, advertising, and video games. My publications include articles on the bossa nova dance craze (in the Luso-Brazilian Review), Brazilian music in a Nike Ad for the 2006 World Cup (in Popular Music and Society), and mobile music distribution in the Brazilian music industry (in the Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies). In addition to my monograph, I am also working on collaborative projects on the global music industries, music’s relationship to commercialization and branding, and curation in streaming music recommendation services. Other research interests include film music and transnational musical cultures.

I teach a variety of courses on global music, popular music, and jazz, including A History of Jazz (MUS 209) and American Popular Music In the Twentieth Century (MUS 276) for the Jazz concentration of the music major. Regular electives include Doing Ethnomusicology (MUS 245/345) and Music and the Global Metropolis (MUS 210). Prior to joining Wellesley, I taught courses on Music and Religious Ecstasy, Latin American Music, Film Music, Music and Social Protest, History of Electronic Dance Music, and Sound Studies. When I develop new courses, I aim to respond to new developments in ethnomusicology and my research as well as student interest.

In addition to academic publications, I also enjoy writing for magazines and blogs aimed at a broader audience. These include Sounding Out! and Sounds and Colours as well as public lectures and guest spots on public radio.

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